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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE- 



TOWN OFFICERS 



-OF THE- 



.:. <?' Y %:. 




*v* c V:'< i f?*^ >Sfe,; 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE- 



Year Ending December 31, 1915 



HERAIvD JOB PRINT, 
NORTHAMPTON 



Finance Committee 



To the Voters of the Town of Hatfield:— 

Gentlemen: — The following appropriations and im- 
provements are hereby recommended for the ensuing 
year by your Finance Committee : 

Obligations already voted on and to be assessed in 
1916:— 

Bradstreet Stone Eoad— Note, $ 2,000.00 
Main, Chestnut, North, and Dwight Streets, 

Note, 2,000.00 

Prospect Street and Grading— Note, 1-300.00 

Third payment and interest — New School 

Loan, 3,575.00 

Street Lights— 228 @ $15.50, 3,534.00 



$ 12,409.00 

Article 5. — Highways. 

Ordinary repairs, highways and bridges, $2,500.00 
Repairs and resurfacting stone roads, 1,500.00 

Article 6. — Necessary town expenses. 

Contingencies, $1,200.00 

Care Memorial Hall, 150.00 



Bonds— Town Officers, 60.00 

Town Water Rates, 500.00 

Salaries— Town Officers, L600.00 

Care of Poor, 1,200.00 

Interest, 800.00 

Insurance, 225.00 

Schools — Maintenance, 11,500.00 

Inspection of Animals, 250.00 



Article 7. — Memorial Day, 
Article 10. — Care of Cemeteries, 
Article 11. — Public Library, 
Article 12. — Muster Day, 
Article 14. — School Physicians, 
Article 15. — Tuition, Smith Agl. School, 
Article 17. — Fire Dept. Supplies, 
Article 18. — Oiling Stone Boacls, 
Article 19. — Tree Warden, 

Article 20.— The sum of $5,000 to be used 
(in connection with $5,000 promised by 
the State) for constructing a perma- 
nent road of stone or river-gravel from 
the end of present stone road near 
North Main street, northerly towards 
the Whately line. Of this sum — 
$1,000 to be assessed on the polls and 
estates of the town for the year 1916, 
$2,000 for the year 1917' and $2,000 for 
the year 1918, 



17,485.00 

75.00 

100.00 

400.00 

75.00 

100.00 

250.00 

100.00 

1,000.00 

100.00 



1,000.00 



5 

Article 21.— Tuition, Smith Academy, 1,000.00 

Article 22. — Enlarging cemetery at Brad- 
street, 600.00 

Article 27. — School sanitaries — iBradstreet, 500.00 



$ 39,194.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE S. BELDEN, 
JOHN C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Warrant for Town 
Meeting, February 7, 1916 



Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at 
said meeting. 

Article 2. — To choose all necessary town officers 
for the ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; 
one Assessor for three years; Town Treasurer; one 
School Committee for three years ; one Water Commis- 
sioner for three years; one Sinking Fund Commis- 
sioner for three years; one Trustee Public Library for 
3 years ; Auditor ; Tree Warden ; Elector under the will 
of Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; six Constables; and to 
vote on the question — "Yes" or "No" — Shall Licenses 
be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the 
forenoon' and be kept open at least four hours, and for 
as much longer time as a majority of the voters pre- 
sent shall direct, but in no case shall they be kept 
open after the hour of sunset. 

Article 3. — To hear the reports of the various 
town officers and committees and act thereon. 



Article 4. — To receive and pass on town ac- 
counts. 

Article 5. — To take action in relation to main- 
tenance and repairs of highways and bridges the en- 
suing year, and raise and appropriate money for same. 

Article 6. — To take action in relation to raising 
money and appropriating same to defray the neces- 
sary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8.— To take action in relation to support 
of the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

Article 9 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 

Article lO.To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for care of cemeteries for the en- 
suing year. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the Public Library for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will vote to au- 
thorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue 
of the current financial year. 



Article 14. — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for the employment of one or 
more School Physicians, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 15. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hat- 
field children attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 16. — To see if the town will vote to ap- 
point a Finance Committee to act for the ensuing year. 

Article 17. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for purchasing supplies needed by the 
Fire Department. 

Article 18. — To see if the town will vote to oil the 
stone roads of the town for the ensuing year, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 19. — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and apropriate money for Tree Warden and Spraying 
work. 

Article 20. — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000 for constructing a 
permanent road of stone or gravel from North Main 
Street northerly towards the Whately line; (said sum 
to be raised as recommended by your Finance Com- 
mittee) and to be built in connection with the State, 
under provisions of Chapter 525, Acts of 1910. 

Article 21. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions and sup- 



plying books for Hatfield pupils in Smith Academy, 
who are of suitable age and attainments to attend 
High School. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate a sum not exceeding $600 for purchasing 
more land needed to enlarge the Bradstreet cemetery 
and in providing play-grounds for the school children. 

Article 23. — To see if the town will vote to accept 
the provisions of Section 339 and 335, Chapter 11, of 
the Eevised Laws, in regard to electing Selectmen for 
three years' and Highway Surveyor by ballot. 

Article 24. — To see if the town will vote to pro- 
vide Public Dumping Grounds for the disposal of rub- 
bish. 

Article 25. — To see if the town will vote to in- 
crease the salary of the Tax Collector for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 26. — To see if the town will vote to aid fi- 
nancially the Y. I. Society in their good work of re- 
placing the trees in the public grounds and streets. 

Article 27. — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $500 for improving the 
sanitary conditions at the Bradstreet school building. 

Article 28. — To see if the voters of the town will 
act on an appeal of the Dickinson Hospital, and "dig 
down into their jeans ' ? and raise and appropriate 
money for same. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : — 

In accordance with the requirements of the Statu- 
tes of Massachusetts, the following report for the year 

ending December 31st, 1915, is respectfully submitted: 

STATE AID 

Paid to three persons, $170.00 

POOR EXPENDITURES 

Aid— cash paid, $ 18.00 

City of Northampton, 404.45 

City of Springfield, 14.56 

Dickinson Hospital, 13.50 

F. J. Morgan, 111.90 

Delia Mason, 49.50 

Mrs. E. Parent, 136.50 

John J. Slattery, 37.50 

M. J, Ryan' sup 13.06 

F. G. Howard, sup. 3.00 

H. D. Smith, sup. 2.40 



11 

H. W Marsh, ex to Tewksbury, 15.00 

Chas. W. Wade, ex. to Tewksbury, 9.76 

Chas. W. Wade, cash paid clothing, 9.59 

A. J. Bonneville, med, attendance, 15.25 

Chas. A. Byrne, mecl. attendance, 25.00 



$ 878.97 



DICKINSON HOSPITAL AND HAMPSHIRE 

COUNTY SANATORIUM 

(Under Chapter 637, Acts of 1912) 

Paid Hampshire County Treasurer, $ 883.32 

Dickinson Hospital, 132.00 



$1,015.32 



OLD BILLS 

Hammond & Hammond, law, Gt. Ponset Road' $224.00 
E. E. Davis, plans North St. and Gt. Ponset 

Road, 156.17 

Smith Academy, books, (1914), 166.54' 



$ 546.71 



SOUTH STREET WALK 

D. P. Sheehan, as Supt. $ 8.00 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, 4.50 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 9.00 

Horace Shumway, team and labor, 5.50 



12 

Ernest Godin, team and labor, 3.50 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 5.00 

Frank Smith, labor* 3.50 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 3.50 

H. L. Pellam, labor, 3.50 

Jacob Geis, labor, 1.75 



$ 47.75 



ORDINARY REPAIRS— HIGHWAYS AND 
BRIDGES 

D. P. Sheehan, services as Supt. $ 488.90 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, 472.39 

D. P. Sheehan, lumber, 11.00 
H. D. Smith, team and labor, and coal, 249.61 
Horace Shumway, team and labor, 227.22 
Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 155.50 
Chas. W. Wade» team and labor, 54.00 
John L. Boyle, team and labor, 9.00 
John C. Ryan, team and labor, 41.50 
H. W. Marsh, team and labor, 46.15 
P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 40.50 

E. A. Breor, team and labor, 4.50 
Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 29.25 
0. Belden & Sons* team and labor, 12.75 
R. E. Donelson, team and labor, 44.75 
H. E. Belden, team and labor, 9.00 
B. M. Warner, team and labor, 2.00 
Belden Bros, team and labor, 5.00 

F. P. Jones, team and labor, 10.25 
Peter J. Deinlein, team and labor, 2.00 



13 



C. H. Crafts, team and labor, snow, 


3.10 


D. W. Wells, team and labor, snow, 


5.00 


James L. Boyle, team and labor- 


62.50 


J. T. Powers, team and labor, 


69.50 


John L. Proulx, team and labor, 


4.50 


David Billings, team and labor, 


4,50 


Wiliam R. Cntter, team and labor, 


9.00 


E. W. Strong, team and labor, gravel and 


and plank, 


116.34 


M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 


34.50 


John L. Sheehan, labor, 


235.55 


Jacob Geis, labor, 


126.88 


John Fishman, labor- 


11.42 


Louis Murry, labor, 


1.35 


John Borowski, labor, 


2.62 


George Martella, labor, 


18.65 


George Budzjn, labor, 


46.00 


John Budzjn, labor, 


6.50 


John B. Bitner, labor, 


2.00 


Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 


74.20 


James R. Coffey, labor, 


2,00 


L. J. Casten, labor, 


63.00 


H. L. Pellam- labor, 


39.30 


Kasimere Repula, labor, 


11.40 


Anthony Stein, labor, 


11.40 


John Ciecinch, labor, 


33.85 


Chas. Wagner, labor, 


6.65 


Anthony Popka, labor, 


8.75 


John Fusek, labor, 


27.00 


J. L. McGrath, labor, 


1.00 


Anthony Penkoski, labor, 


1.00 



14 

Frank Ogenski, labor* 1.75 

Melchior Servisker, labor, 7.60 

Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 25.10 

Frank Smith, labor, 55.60 

E. J. Burke, labor, 81.60 

Alex Szestowicki, labor, 73.65 

Joseph Hulbert, labor, 60.22 

J. P. Kelly, labor, common, 6.75 

C. I. Stowell, labor, common, 35.10 

William P. Boyle- painting, 22.60 

Fred Roberts, painting carts, etc, 42.00 

David Mullany, plank, 81.14 

Archie P. Graves, plank, 96.00 

Pendergast Bros, moving S. Roller, 7.15 

Chase & Cooliclge, oil, 6.60 

L. H. Kingsley, sand, 30.40 

Wm. Dickinson, sand, 13.90 

J. T. Fitzgibbons, sand, 19.00 

M. J. Ryan, sand, 3.20 

J. M. Pierce, signs, 1.60 

J. J. Sullivan, labor, 10.00 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., rep. 13.51 

City of Northampton, stone, 63.27 

Buytosky & Kermisker, labor, 4.00 

C. E. Herrick, rep. 1.00 

N. E. Ed. Mcy. Co., scraper blade, 8.50 

W. H. Riley & Co., rep. roller and tile, 21.59 

S. W. Kingsley, rep., 8.90 

John Stoddard, stone, 1.00 

Fred Kleasner, stone, 1.00 

George Eberlein, rep., 17.95 



15 

Foster-Farrar Co., sup., 19.10 

J. J. Curtis, plumbing, 47.29 

B. & M. ft., 37.14 



$3,879.94 



NORTH STREET 

D. P. Sheehan, services as Supt. $ 70.00 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, 50.00 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 32.50 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 63.50 

John C. Eyan, team and labor, 68.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team and labor, 14.80 

John L. Boyle, team and labor, 18.00 

Wm. S. Murphy, team and labor, 13.50 

M. H. Dwight, team and labor, 2.50 

John F. O'Dea, team and labor, 22.50 

John L. Sheehan, labor, 42.50 

Thomas Buytoski, labor, 2.00 

Alex Szestowicki, labor, 30.20 

Jacob Greis, labor, 24.70 

Ewd. J. Burke, labor, 22.20 

Frank Kruliski, labor, 3.95 





$480.85 


INSURANCE 




try L. Howard, 


$ 226,74 


fie & Lovett, 


856.80 



$1,083.54 



16 




SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 




Chas. A. Byrne, 


$ 50.00 


A. J. Bonneville, 


50.00 



$100.00 

GRADING GROUNDS— NEW SCHOOL BUILDING 

P. H. Elwood, Jr. plans, etc. $ 50.33 

H. D. Smith, cement, 154.00 

George Eberlein, 9.75 

John F. O 'Dea, team and labor, 145.25 

James L. Day, team and labor, 183.00 

James S. Bardwell, team and labor, 86.50 

M. J. Ryan, team and labor, 198.59 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 107.00 

H. Shnmway, team and labor, 73.00 

Michael Dulaski, labor, 241.85 

Kietan Backiel, labor, 62.32 

Jnlins Galowek, labor, 19.25 

Eddie Kazlaski, labor, 19.25 

Jnlins Foster, labor, 56.33 

John Nesleski, labor, 48.88 

John Kostek, labor, 45.50 

William Harmon, labor, 43,75 

F. J. Saffer, labor, 20.63 

John Mageski, labor, 23.08 

Michael Duda, labor, 3.50 

Joseph Demurra, labor, 19.25 

Stanley Pelaski, labor, 3.50 

Victor Melinski, labor, 4.70 



17 

Anthony Conjulka, labor, 3.50 

H. E. Bardwell, sand, 8.00 

H. Wales Lines Co., tile, 31.20 

D. W. Lewis Co., tile, 92.08 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile, 18.68 

B. & M. Eoad, ft. on tile, 83.43 

Northampton Iron Works, grates, 10.00 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 16.98 

Bowker Fertilizer Co., fertilizer, 10.50 

Foster-Farrar Co., tree guards, 7.50 



DWIGHT STREET 



$1,901.08 



D. P. Sheehan, as Supt. $ 12.00 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, 25.00 

H. Shunrway, team and labor, 13.50 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 13.50 

C. W. Wade, team and labor, 27.50 

H. D. Smith, team and labor, 9.00 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 15.00 

George M. Franklin, labor, 9.05 

L. J. Casten, labor, 19.25 

H. L, Pellam, labor, 9.05 

Jacob Geis, labor, 5.55 

Geo. Martella, labor, 1.75 

John Devine, labor, 3.50 

Frank Smith, labor, 5.55 

John Ciecinch, labor, 2.05 

Anthony Popka; labor, 3.50 



18 



W. H. Eiley & Co., tile, 10.40 

B. & M. Eoad, cinders, 330.00 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 



$515 J 5 



Clinton J. Richards, services as Supt., $ 664.32 

Clinton J. Richard, sundries sold, 25.99 

Mary L. Allaire, services as Principal, 684.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, teaching, 432.00 

Margaret Woods, teaching, 432.00 

Mary C. Leary, teaching, 397.00 

Doris J. Rand, teaching, 355.00 

Marguerite M. McGrath, teaching, 190.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, teaching, 432.00 

Constance C. Breor, teaching, 432.00 

Gladys Jenney, teaching, 432.00 

Christine Hibbard, teaching, 432.00 

Helen F. Riley, teaching, 432.00 

Gladys L. Rice, teaching, 252.00 

Lena H. Proulx, teaching, 411.00 

Nellie T. O'Brien, teaching, 432.00 

Gladys V. Rand, teaching, 252.00 

Theresa Nolan, teaching, 135.00 

Mary B. Woods, teaching, 144.00 

Alice E. Keating, teaching, 135.00 

Georgia Gates, teaching, 180.00 

Mrs. Thaddeus Graves, teaching, 12.00 

Margaret A. Mullany, evening school, 7.00 

Marian C. Billings, evening school, 23.00 

Grace W. Bardwell, evening school, 27.00 



19 

Koswell E. Hubbard, evening school, 23.00 

Mary J. Powers, evening school, 25.00 

Maude E. Boyle, music, 216.00 

Anna L. Kilmurry, writing, 115.00 

Asenath H. Landers, drawing, 116.00 
Mass. Teachers' Retirement Board, pensions, 216.00 
John F. 'Dea, janitor, labor and cash paid, 646.08 

James P. Kelly, janitor and labor, 161.75 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor and cleaning, 100.25 

Kate Flynn, janitor, 109.00 

John Salvas, janitor, 117.50 

Eli Frenier, janitor, 40.38 

Wm. P. iBoyle, painting and rep. 397.35 

H. D. Smith, coal, 993.52 

John J. Betsold, wood, 59.50 

John Borowski, labor, 18.00 

J. J. Curtis, plumbing, 58.37 

Marcus G. Mullins, wiring school house, 70.50 

F. G. Vollinger, sawing wood, 5.00 

O. Belding & Sons, care grounds, 10.00 

Foster-Farrar Co., sup. 11.92 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co. tel., 30.05 

Northfield Press, bks., 5.45 

Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., tickets, 150.00 

Wm. H. Belden, tickets, 5.82 

Lathrop Mfg., sup. 8.00 

C. B. Dolge Co., disinfectant, 29.00 

D. E. F. Radish, mist., 21.25 
George Eberlein, rep., 21.00 
A. N. Palmer Co., bks., 28.40 
Am. Book Co., bks., 302.03 



20 

B H. Sanborn & Co., bks., 59.12 

J. H. Quinn, furn., 18.25 

D. C. Heath & Co., bks., 13.33 
Charles Scribners Sons, bks., 31.12 

E. E. Babb & Co., bks., 171.74 
Silver, Burdette & Co., bks., 72.59 
J. L. Hammett Co., bks., 61.43 
Ginn & Co., bks., 135.60 
Eand McNally & Co., bks., 49.63 
Lyons & Carnahan, bks., 93.84 
Clarence Hawkes, bk. 5.00 
Houghton Mifflin & Co., bks, 62.82 
G. & C. Merriam & Co., bks., 13.05 
D. Appleton & Co., bks., 20.83 
Milton Bradley Co., sup., 67.46 
H. C. Shaw, bk., 5.18 

F. M. Crittenden, ptg., 12.20 
D. P. Sheehan, trucking, 31.91 
A. F. Lovering, boiler inspection, 2.00 
Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 35.30 
Amherst Gas Co., electric lights, 11.75 
Boston Music Co., music, 6.46 
Fred G. Howard, sup., 28.71 
F. L. Betsold, labor, 28.75 
A. E. Breor, labor, ft. and ex. paid, 31.20 
C. K Fitts, sup., ^ 17.90 
Cary Safe Co., safe, 65.05 
W. A. Bailey, brick, 7.50 
J. M. Strong, transportation, 5.00 
C. H. Crafts, transportation, 5.00 
Wright & Potter, sup., .63 



21 

Dora Sunek, cleaning, 21.00 

Victor Surinsky, labor, 11.00 

John Koisor, labor, 11.00 

Louis A. Webber, mowing lawn, 15.00 

Allan K. Smith, mowing lawn, 9.00 



$ 12,543.78 



TREE WARDEN AND SPRAYING 

S. W. Kingsley, spraying, $ 60.13 

James P. Kelly, spraying, 23.00 

Panl Favor, spraying, 72.00 

J. T. Powers, spraying, 50.00 

Merrimac Chemical Co., lead, 17.00 

Young Bros. Co., ladder, 7.25 

D. P. Sheehan, trimming trees, 3.50 

E. J. McGrath, guard, .50 
George Eberlein, iron rods, 7.65 
J. A. Sullivan, saw, 1.50 
P. J. Whalen, services Tree Warden and labor, 115.42 
Wm. J. Ormond, trimming trees, 10.88 



$374.83 

MUSTER DAY 

M. J. Ryan, Fire Chief, $100.00 

TOWN OFFICERS 

M. W. Boyle, services as Selectman, 1914, $ 150.00 

H. D. Smith, services as Selectman, 1914, 75.00 

J. J. Betsold, services as Selectman, 1914, 75.00 



22 

C. K. Morton, services as Elector, 10.00 

D. W. Wells, services as Water Commissioner, 10.00 
M. J. Proulx, services as Water Commissioner, 10.00 
C. W. Wade, services as Water Commissioner, 10.00 
P. W. Mullins, services as Assessor, 81.25 

E. W. Strong, services as Assessor, 90.00 
L. H. Kingsley, services as Assessor, 175.00 
E. L. Graves, Tax Collector, 1914, 205.00 
E. L. Graves, Sealer and Ballot Clerk, 78.00 
Thomas W. Eyan, Eegistrar of Voters, 10.00 
S. F. Billings, Eegistrar of Voters, 10.00 
E. W. Weber, Eegistrar of Voters, 10.00 
L. H. Kingsley, Eegistrar of Voters, 10.00 

C. I. Stowell, Ballot Clerk, 8.00 
Scott Harris, Ballot Clerk, 3.00 

D. E. Holley, Ballot Clerk, 8.00 
Eobt. J. McGrath, Ballot Clerk, 6.00 
L. H. Kingsley, services as Town Clerk 

Bd. of Selectmen, 500.00 

as Town Treasurer, 100.00 

A. E. Breor, services as School Committee, 25.00 

J. F. O'Dea, services as School Committee, 20.00 



$1,679.25 



PUBLIC LIBEAEY 

Miss H. C. Sargeant, bks., 2.06 

Natl. Geological Society, bks., 2.00 

Care of Books, 6.00 

David B. Clarkson Co., bks., 22.48 

E. H. Hinckley Co., bks., 35.64 



23 

Margaret A Mnllany, magazines, 23.50 

I. A. Flint, ex paid, 1.00 

H. E. Huntting Co., bks., 37.30 

J. W. Heffernan, bks., 11.72 

Library Bureau, sup., 4.15 

Briclgman & Lyman, bks., 18.76 

Metcalf & Co. tickets, 1.50 

Lizzie Dreska, cleaning, 7.88 

F. G. Howard, team, 6.25 

H. T. Eavans, bk., 3.90 

Underwood & Underwood, pictures, 25.75 

Gazette Ptg. Co., postals, 4.00 

Dorothy Lynch, Asst. Librarian, 27.00 

C. M. Barton, Librarian, catalog, etc. 148.61 

Margaret A. Eyan, Asst. Librarian, 10.50 



BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 



WASHOUTS AND CULVERTS 



$400.00 



H. L. Howard, bond Treasurer, 32.00 

H. L. Howard, bond Coll. 25.00 



$57.00 



D. P. Sheehan, as Supt. 68.00 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, 92.10 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 75.50 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 36.25 

J. T. Powers, team and labor, 14.00 



24 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 21.00 

C. W. Wade, team and labor, 17.20 

Wm. E. Cutter, team and labor, 18.00 

M. H. Dwight, team and labor, 19.65 

E. W. Strong, team and labor, 21.75 
P. W. Mnllins, team and labor, 40.55 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor, 14.25 
John F. O'Dea, team and labor, 28.50 
James Mullins, team and labor, 16.37 
C. H. Crafts, team and labor, 9.47 

A. H. Marsh, team and labor, 6.25 
H. W. Marsh, team and labor, 36.00 
J. L. Pronlx, team and labor, 21.00 

B. M. Warner, team and labor, 6.00 
J. C. Eyan, team and labor, 39.85 
M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 40.50 
Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 44.00 
James L. Boyle, team and labor, 55.75 
J. L. Sheehan, labor, 40.00 
Joseph Hnlbert, labor, 13.00 
Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 12,85 
H. L. Pellam, labor, 26.00 
Mike Servisker, labor, 24.00 
E. J. Burke, labor, 36.65 
Alex Szestowicki, labor, 28.00 
Chas. Wagner, labor, 14.65 
Frank Smith, labor, 29.25 
John Filipek, labor, 5.00 
Frank Ogeski, labor, 13.05 
Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 12.25 
Jacob Geis, labor, 30.80 



25 



John Ciecinch, labor, 


17.50 


John Fusek, labor, 


16.65 


Anthony Buytoski, labor, 


1.75 


Stanley Kirejyzk, labor, 


5.25 


Paul Wirgielewicz, labor, 


3.50 


L. H. Kingsley, sand, 


23.60 


Frank E. Wilkie, sand, 


1.50 


Thos. W. Ryan, sand, 


3.10 


Sarah Brennan, sand, 


6.05 


S. H. Field, sand, 


2.80 


S. W. Kingsley, sand, 


1.30 


M. J. Ryan, sand, 


4.05 


J. J. Stenglein, labor and sand, 


19.05 


Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 


21.74 


F. L. Betsold, labor, 


8.00 



$1,163.28 

WATER RATES 

Superintendent, $500.00 

BALANCE NEW SCHOOL BUILDING 

Am. Seating Co., seats, $ 110.91 

Stone-Underhill Heating Co., 2,070.00 

A. D. McCormack, on contract, 8,233.25 

Wm. P. Boyle, ptg., 97.13 

C. N. Fitts Co., shades, 220.00 

Karl S. Putnam, Archt., 500.00 

Brown-Gates Co., over allowance, 38.50 

J. H. Quinn, furniture, 687.90 



26 



Foster-Farrar Co., over allowance, 42.00 

Phelps &• Gare, clocks, 34.80 

J. J. Betsold, cartage fixtures, 10.00 

P. F. O'Leary, signs, 6.24 



Paid on contract — 1914, 
Grading-1914, 
Grading — 1915, 
Am. Seating Co., 1914, 
Electric wiring, 1914, 
B. & M. Ed. ft., 


$ 12,050.73 

$ 35,134.06 

502.56 

1,901.08 

1,098.79 

67.50 
51.60 


Reed, from sale of bonds, 1914, 
Premium on same, 
J. E. Porter, 
School fund, 1914, 
Silas Porter Fund, 1914, 
Grading— 1915, 


$ 50,806.32 

$ 40,000.00 
2,277.00 
5,000.00 
1,217.89 
502.56 
1,901.08 



$ 50,898.53 

DIKES, SEWERS, DITCHES AND DRAINS 

D. P. Sheehan, as Supt., 50.00 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, 38.75 

Horace Shumway, team and labor, 18.00 

Dennis "Whalen, team and labor, 6.50 

C. W. Wade, team and labor, * 6.50 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor and cement, 12.60 

John L. Sheehan, labor, 35.00 



27 



Alex Szestowicki, labor, 


27.60 


Jacob Geis, labor, 


7.85 


Edw. J. Burke, labor, 


2.00 


Geo. Matella, labor, 


2.60 


Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 


4.35 


H. L. Pellam, labor, 


2.60 


Frank Smith, labor, 


2.60 


Anthony Popka, labor, 


2.62 


John Ciecinch, labor, 


1.75 


H. E. Bardwell, sand, 


17.40 


Northampton Iron Works, catch basins, 


72.00 


H. D. Smith, cement and tile, 


103.10 


Howes Brick Co., brick, 


22.50 


J. F. O'Dea, brick, 


1.50 


W. H. Biley & Co tile, 


273.15 


Michael Dulaski, cement, 


2.00 


E. E. Davis, grades, 


18.34 


M. D. Patteson, grades, 


5.50 



$ 736.81 

CONTINGENCIES 

O. N. Field, music school dedication, $ 32.64 

M. J. Proulx, police duty, 19.50 
P. E. Mullany, post., T Eeports, stamps, and 

env. 21.90 

Herald Job Print, ptg. T. Eeports and ballots, 210.00 

Est. A. L. Strong, wood, 16.50 

Brown-Gates Co., electric bulbs, 101.26 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber T. Hall, 15.45 

Amherst Gas Co., light T. Hall, 30.29 



28 

George Eberlein, labor, and police Bradstreet, 29.60 

Scott Harris, care clock, T. Hall and wood, 11.00 

G. H. Clark, rep. clock, 1.00 

Stowell Printing ,Co., sup. Sealer, 2.50 

W. & E. L. Gurley, sup. Sealer, 7.08 

C. H. Chase, transfers, 10.35 

H. L. Howard, exr, and workmen liability, 62.00 

State Dept. Health, stamp, 5.30 

Hobbs & Warren, printing and blanks, 14.12 

J. A. Sulivan, hdwre. and supplies, 45.22 

Lizzie Dreska, clg., 4.37 

H. W. Marsh, asst. Constable, 5.00 

M. G. Mullins, bulbs, 3.20 

J. B. Bitner, Furstch's Shed, 50.00 

Mike Dulaski, rep. T. Hall, 4.55 

F. G. Howard, sup., 1.37 

H. D. Smith, ex. Land & Harbor Corns., 26.32 
H. D. Smith, lawn mower and auto for police, 10.00 

Wm. P. Boyle ptg T. Hall, 70.96 

C. W. Wade, ex to Tewksbury, twice, 22.00 

Northampton Commercial College, sup., 5.37 

John Barowski, sawdust, 1.00 

J. H. Quinn, shades, 29.00 

L. A. Webber, grading and mowing lawn, 27.90 

M. D. Patteson, grades, 16.50 

B. & M. Ed. ft. on safes, 6.40 

C. I. Stowell, care Wilkie plot, 4.00 
C. B. Dolge Co., disinfectant, 3.25 
C. T. Bagnall, tax bills, 5.63 
Johnson's Bookstore, Coll. book, 2.00 
H. S. Gere & Sons, ad by-laws, 18.00 



29 

Gazette Ptg. Co. postals, 4.00 

Foster-Farrar Co., sup. 5.40 

Cary Safe Co., safe, 55.95 

S. W. Kingsley, police duty, 25.75 

A. R. Breor, police duty, 6.00 
L. H. Kingsley, recording, indexing births, 

marriages and deaths, : 59.60 

Serving S. Warrants, 19.00 

Fares, tel. ex. and postage paid, 15.94 

C. A. Byrne, returning births, and med. attd. 17.75 

A. J. Bonneville, retng births and fumigating, 31.25 



$1,193.17 

STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Company, $3,501.25 

MAIN STREET STONE ROAD 

D. P. Sheehan, as Supt., 120.00 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, - 116.75 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 119.25 

John C. Ryan, team and labor, 112.50 

John T. Powers, team and labor, 57.37 

C. W. Wade, team and labor, 102.63 

David Billings, team and labor, 107.25 

Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 103.50 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 114.75 

O. Belden & Sons, team and labor, 49.50 

John L. Proulx, team and labor, 97.25 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 54.25 



30 



P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 


103.75 


Joseph Goelowski, team and labor, 


15.75 


M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 


106.00 


H. E. Bardwell, team and labor, and sand, 


128.77 


H. D. Smith, team and labor and coal, 


150.05 


M. J. Eyan, sand, 


25.00 


Wm. H. Dickinson, sand, 


24.70 


J. L. Sheehan, labor, 


72.50 


Jacob Geis, labor, 


48.12 


Chas. Wagner, labor, 


47.37 


Frank Smith, labor, 


49.87 


John Fusek, labor, 


55.00 


Mike Servisker, labor, 


3.50 


Alex Szestowicki, labor, 


44.62 


Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 


48.12 


John Ciecinch, labor, 


46.49 


E. J. Burke, labor, 


50.00 


H. L. Pellam, labor, 


40.24 


Stanley labor, 


3.50 


Frank Burda, labor, 


23.62 


Joseph Hulbert, labor, 


104.00 


Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 


35.87 


John Vachula, labor, 


35.12 


Joseph Prew, labor, 


28.00 


Henry Godbeer, bound stones, 


4.00 


J. S. Lane & Sons, stone, 


2,408.13 



$4,857.09 



31 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 

James L. McGrath, labor, Hotel fire, 2.00 

JohnF. O'Dea, labor, 5.00 

F. T. Bardwell, forest fires, 11.85 

W. L. Chilson, rep. harness, 13.70 

Boston Woven Hose Co., hose, 260.00 

Fred Wensel, storing hose wagon and lab., 9.00 

John Borowski, horse at fire, 3.00 

H. W. Marsh, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

Mrs. James Mullins, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

C. H. Crafts, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

J. J. Betsold, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

Thos. M. O'Dea, storing hose wagon, 5.00 



$ ' 329.55 



CHESTNUT STREET STONE ROAD 

D. P. Sheehan, as Supt,, 40.00 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, 48.55 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 39.35 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 35.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 36.25 

P. W. Mnllins, team and labor and sand, 50.35 

H. D. Smith, team and labor and coad, 68.24 

C. W. "Wade, team and labor, 20.00 

B. M. Warner, team and labor, 6.50 

David Billings, team and labor, 30.00 

Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 32.50 

O. Belden & Sons, team and labor, 34.50 

H. W. Marsh, team and labor, 34.50 



32 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 52.00 

H. L. Pellam, labor, 24.10 

Chas. Wagner, labor, 15.35 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 35.00 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 18.85 

Jacob Geis, labor, 18.85 

Joseph Hulbert, labor, 45.50 

Geo. Matella, labor, 11.85 

Mike Servisker, labor, 8.00 

E. J. Burke, labor, 19.00 

Frank Smith, labor, 20.60 

John Fusek, labor, 23.60 

Alex Szestowicki, labor, 13.40 

Stanley labor, 3.50 

John Ciecinch, labor, 15.35 

Frank Burda, labor, 10.90 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co. culvert, 61.12 

J. S. Lane & Sons, stone, 641.96 



$1,515.2: 
INSPECTION OF ANIMALS AND CARCASSES 



E. S. Warner, 


$235.60 


F. T. Bardwell, 


44.00 




$279.60 


CARE MEMORIAL jBUILDING 




H. D. Smith, coal, 


$ 57.51 


John J. Betsold, wood, 


13.00 


L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 


75.00 



$145.51 



33 

care oe; cemeteries 

F. EL Bardwell, Treas, $100.00 

TUITION— SMITH ACADEMY 

David Billings, Treas., $1,000.00 

PROSPECT STREET STONE ROAD 

D. P. Sheehan, as Supt., 24.00 

D. P. Sheehan, team and labor, 33.75 
Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 28.50 
J. T. Powers, team and labor, 28.50 
J. C. Ryan, team and labor, _ 4.50 
P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 22.50 
H. Shumway, team and labor, 36.00 
James L. Boyle, team and labor, 24.00 
Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 27.00 
M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 24.00 
J. L. Proulx, team and labor, 4.50 
C. W. Wade, team and labor, 4.50 
P. W. Mullins, team and labor, 4.50 
H. D. Smith, coal, 22.98 
J. L. Sheehan, labor, 25.00 
Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 8.75 

E, J. Burke, labor, 6.00 
Joseph Hulbert, labor, 39.00 
John Fusek, labor, 12.00 
Jacob Geis, labor, 8.75 
H. L. Pellam, labor, 10.50 
Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 7.60 



34 



Frank Smith, labor, 


13.25 


Alex Szeetowicki, labor, 


8.6U 


John Ciecinch, labor, 


9.35 


Frank Ogeski, labor, 


3.50 


Stanley Kirejyzk, labor, 


5.85 


Anthony Buytosky, labor, 


.80 


Chas. Wagner, labor, 


.80 


City of Northampton, stone, 


5.00 


Stefan Karpenskie, sand, 


30.20 


N. E. Metal Culvert Co., culvert, 


72.74 


J. S. Lane & Sons, stone, 


312/79 



$ 869.71 

SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 
Tuition, $350.00 

MEMORIAL DAY 
C. K. Morton, $75.00 

OILING STONE ROADS 



Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


$ 135.00 


Am. Car Sprinkler Co., oil, 


694.52 


Standard Oil Co., oil, 


80.15 


J. S. Lane & Sons, pea stone, 


37.79 



$ 947.46 



35 

RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 

State Aid, 170.00 

Poor Expenditures, 878.97 
Hampshire County and Dickinson Hospitals, 1,015.32 

Contingencies, 1,739.88 

New School Building, 12.050.73 

Insurance, 1,083.54 

Schools, 12,543.78 

Ordinary — Highways and Bridges, 3,879.94 

Fire Dept. 329.55 

Bonds— Town Officers, 57.00 

Water Rates, 500.00 

Public Library, 400.00 

Town Officers, 1,679.25 

Grading School Grounds, 1,901.08 

Street Lights, 3,501.25 

Dwight Street, 515.15 

Tree Warden and Spraying, 374.83 

Smith Industrial School, 350.00 

Oiling Roads, 947.46 

Memorial Day, 75.00 

Chestnut Street Road, 1,515.27 

South Street Walk, 47.75 

Main Street Road, 4,857.09 

Memorial Building, 145.51 

Prospect Street Road, 869.71 

North Street Road, 480.85 

Inspection of Caracsses, 279.60 

Washout and Culverts, 1,163.28 

Sewers, Ditches and Dikes, 736.81 



36 

Muster Day, 100.00 

Care of Cemeteries, 100.00 

Tuition— Smith Academy, 1,000.00 

School Physicians, 100.00 



$ 55,388.60 



Eespectfully submitted, 
H. D. SMITH, 
CHAS. W. WADE, 
H. W. MABSH, 

Selectmen of Hatfield, 



I have this day examined the books of the Se- 
lectmen and find them correct. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
January 6, 1916. 



37 



LIST OF APPROPRIATIONS VOTED TO BE RAIS- 
ED AT THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, 
HELD FEBRUARY 1st, 1915. 



i 50 
75 
100 
100 
100 
150 
60 
300 

100 

300 

300 

400 

3,000 

1,000 

500 

1,500 

10,000 

500 

1,600 

1,350 

1,000 



for 



Repairs on sidewalk on South street. 

Memorial Day. 

Care of Cemeteries. 

Firemen's Muster. 

School Physicians. 

Care of Memorial Building. 

Bonds — Town Officers. 

Inspection of Animals, beeves and car- 
casses. 

Six St. Lights, from Larkin Place to 
Bank's corner. 

Tuition — Smith Industrial School. 

Spraying Trees and Tree Warden Work. 

Public Library. 

Highways and Bridges — Ordinary Re- 
pairs. 

Tuitions and books — Hatfield pupils at- 
tending Smith Academy. 

Fire Department — apparatus and sup- 
plies. 

Grading and improving the grounds — 
New school building. 

Schools — maintenance of — and Dog Fund 

Water rates. 

Salaries — Town Officers. 

Poor — suport of. 

Insurance. 



38 

800 " Interest. 

1,200 " Contingencies. 

1,000 " Oiling Stone Eoacls. 

1,000 " /Building Stone Roads — assessed in 1915. 

2,500 " Bradstreet Road Note— due Aug. 1st 1915 

2,000 " Bradstreet Eoad Note— due May 22, 1915 

3,665 " Second Payment New School Bldg. — dug 

June 30, and Dec. 31, 1915. 

3,441 " Street Lights. 

$38,091 " Total sum to be assessed on the polls and 
estates of the town for 1915. 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT- 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD,— 1916 



Name, 
Bardwell, Frederick T. 
Bardwell, Arthur C. 
Balise, Paul 
Betsold, Frank L. 
Billings, Louis A. 
Bitner, John B. 
Boyle, George A. 
Carl, Henry W. 
Cutter, William R. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Eldridge, Edwin H. 
Fitzgerald, David L. 
Fitzgerald, Thomas J. 
Langdon, William W. 
Lovett, Frank E. 



Occupation 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 

Machinist 



39 



Lovett, Charles 
McGrath, 2d, Robert J. 
Marsh, Harry W. 
Mullins, James 
O'Dea, Thomas M. 
Proulx, M. Larkin- 
Ryan, John C. 
Slattery, Chas. F. 
Slieelian, Daniel P. 
Wade, Charles W. 
Wells, Reuben F. 
Wight, Leland H. 



Insurance Agt. 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield 

Dr. 

To balance in Treasury, $ 5,379.05 

To cash rec'd from E. L, Graves, coll. (1914) 12,034.40 

To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, coll. (1915) 30,655.44 

Treas. Water Commissioners, 2,900.00 

Dist. Court fines, 186.46 

Slaughter Licenses, 8.00 

Auctioneer License, 1.00 

Pool Licenses, 4.00 

Sealer's Eeceipts, 79.39 

Rent of Town Hall, 62.00 

A. D. McCormack, gravel sold, 50.00 

Sale of Junk, 1.00 

Mrs. L. A. Wight, cem. plot .50 

George Petcen, cem. plot, .50 

Paul Cernak, cem. plot, .50 

Licenses — junk, fruit and dry goods, 132.00 

Town of Whately, tuition, 117.50 

City of Northampton, tuition, 162.60 

City of Boston, sup. 21.50 



41 



Eefunding dog fund, 126.77 

Refund, A. N. Palmer Co., 19.20 

Mary L. Allaire, bbl. apples, 1.50 

C. J. Richards, bbl. apples and sup. sold, 8.92 
A. R. Breor, tickets sold, 17.84 
State — Income Mass. School Fund, 664.41 

School Supt. Union, 535.72 

Corporation Tax, 219.13 

St. Railway Tax, 409.31 

National Bank Tax, 780.70 

Trans, paupers, 11.40 

Tuition— Smith School, 277.77 

State Aid, ' 140.00 

Highway Commission, 2,500.00 

Electric bulbs sold, 22.25 

Two catch basins sold, 12.00 

Joseph Kirejczyk, old plank, 6.50 

J. J. O'Malley, team work, 2.00 

Joseph Fox, load gravel, 1.00 

George Bishop, load gravel, 2.00 

J. T. Powers, shovel, 1.25 

D. P. Sheehan, care of wife at Hospital 28.00 
Carrie E. Billings, gravel, 10.00 
Am. Gas Co., rep. stone road, 17.50 
J. J. Curtis, lab. 1.75 
J. E. Porter, contributed New School 

house, 1,000.00 

P. A. McGlynn, sewer entrance and tile, 43.00 

John Lizork, sewer entrance and tile, 41.00 

Fred Schepp, sewer entrance and tile, 65.24 

John Filipek, sewer entrance and tile, 42.00 



42 

Joseph Zywna, sewer entrance and tile, 44.10 

Arcliie Dugal, sewer entrance and tile, 39.12 

L. A. Powers, sewer entrance and tile, 46.00 

Antoni Przoda, sewer entrance and tile, 178.70 

P. J. Wlialen, sewer entrance and tile, 46.73 

John Pelis, sewer entrance and tile, 52.90 

Edw. J. Day, sewer entrance, 33.00 

Wm. P. Boyle, sale of tile, 5.00 

John Porstch, sale of tile, 41.00 

John Borowski, sale of tile, 26.25 

John McHugh, sale of tile, 3.78 

M. Larkin Proulx, sewer entrance, 33.00 

John L. Proulx, sewer entrance, 33.00 

Kostanti Kiakoski, sewer entrance, 23.00 

Thomas M. O'Dea, sewer entrance and 

ditch, 37.00 

M. Crawford, sewer entrance and. ditch 37.50 

Edw. J. Day, lab, laying sewer, 10.00 

James L. Day, laying drain, 34.00 

Est. J. H. Howard, cleaning ditch, 7.50 

C. M. Barton, lab. and sewer entrance, 42.00 

Samuel Osley, lab. and tile, 85.10 

To cash rec'd from Temporary Loans: 

North 'n Inst, for Savings, $ 7,000.00 
Nort'n Inst, for Savings, 4,000.00 

North 'n Inst, for Savings, 1,300.00 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 10,000.00 

F. S. Mosely & Co. 11,520.62 

$33,820.62 

$93,483.30 



43 




Cr. 




By cash paid Selectmen's orders, $55,388.60 


Interest on Water Bonds, 


2,000.00 


Dist. Court fees, 


113.53 


Bureau of Statistics, 


12.00 


Interest on temporary loans, 


885.82 


County Tax, 


3,461.98 


State Tax, 


3,900.00 


State Eepairs Highways, 


294.79 


Treasurer Sinking Fund, 


861.67 


Balance in Treasury, 


1,399.91 


By cash paid Temporary Notes: 




Northampton Inst, for Savings, $ 


5,000.00 


Northampton Inst, for Savings, 


7,000.00 


C. D. Parker & Co., 


2,000.00 


First National Bank, 


2,500.00 


2d Note and Interest — New School house 


, 3,665.00 


Nonotuck Savings Bank, part payment, 


5,000.00 



$93,483.30 

IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GBAVES, COLLECTOR. 

(1914 Taxes.) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $12,034.40 

Assessors' orders of Abmts., 60.02 

$ 12,094.42 



44 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, $11,881.54 

Interest collectetd, 156.88 

Addition to Warrant, 56.00 



$ 12,094.42 



(1915 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $30,655.44 

Uncollected taxes, 15,992.10 

Assessors' orders of Abmts., 75.87 



Cr. 

By Assessors' Warrant, 
Addition to Warrant, 
Interest collected, 


$45,949.92 

752.96 

20.53 



$46,723.41 



$46,723.41 

I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector 
and find that he has been credited by the Treasurer 
with the amount of $12,034.40 of the taxes of 1914, and 
$30,655.44 of the taxes of 1915. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, January 6, 1916. 



45 

WATER SINKING FUND 

To thirty years four per cent Water Bonds, $ 50,000.(1 
By Sinking Fund, 23,684.56 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

Dr. 

To outstanding Note, due May 15, 1916, $ 5,000.00 
Outstanding Note, due June 21, 1916, 12,000.00 



$17,000.00 



Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, $ 15,992.10 

Due from State Aid, 170.00 

State— Smith School, 175.00 

Sewer Assessments and Drains, 600.00 
Balance in Treasury, 1,399.91 



$ 18,337.01 
Balance in favor of the town, $1,337.01 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer. 

I have examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the town of Hatfield for the year ending 
December 31st, 1915, and find them correct. I find 
Selectmen's orders on file to the amount of fifty-five 
thousand, three hundred eighty-eight dollars and sixty 
cents, ($55,388.60) with evidence of their payment by 



46 

him; Also, cancelled notes and receipts for State and 
County taxes and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of thirteen hun- 
dred and ninety-nine dollars and ninety-one c< 
($1,399.91). 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, January 6, 1916. 



Report of Sinking Fund Commissioners 



We have the following amounts placed to the credit 
of the Sinking Fund: 

Northampton Inst, for Savings, $ 1,462.94 
Nonotuck Savings Bank, 1,421.90 
Easthampton Savings Bank, 641.89 
Haydenville Savings Bank, 1,302.61 
Florence Savings Bank, 1,288.54 
Union Trust Co., Springfield, 2,376.13 
Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 1,097.23 
Springfield Inst, for Savings, 1,093.32 
Springfield Street Railway Co., Bond, 1,000.00 
New York, New Haven & Hartford, Rail- 
road, Bond, 2,000.00 
Boston & Maine Railroad, Bond 3,000.0f 
Town of Hatfield Water Bond, 7,000.00 



$ 23,684.56 
M. J. RYAN, 
JOHN McHUGH, 
E. S. WARNER, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the accounts of the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners and found them as re- 
ported, January 7, 1916. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 



Water Commissioners Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the 
twentieth annual report of the Board of Water Com- 
missioners : 

We have received the past year as follows: 

Balance of cash from last year's acct.$ 934.08 
Cash from collection of water rates 5,121.87 



$6,055.95 

We have paid the past year as follows: 

Town of Hatfield from water rates, $2,900.00 
E. D. Wood & Co., water pipe and 

specials, 420.30 

Charles Miller & Sons Co., lead, 33.56 

H. W. Wolfram, laying water pipe, 215.80 

Robert M. Kellogg, split sleeves, 53.00 

W. Eiley & Co., supplies, 135.29 
Norwood Engineering Co., Hydrants 

gates and service boxes, 108.20 
Northampton Water Works, tapping 

main and specials, 52.83 

M. J. Proulx, unloading pipe, 25.00 

M. J. Proulx, inspection of laying pipe, 12.60 
H. S. G-ere & Sons, advertising for 

bids, 1.25 

Boston & Maine E, E., freight, 54.15 



49 

W. P. Boyle, painting hydrants, 23.00 

Edson W. Strong, coll. water rates 153.65 
Edson W. Strong, labor and cash 

paid, 129.62 

S. W. Kingsley, labor and cash paid, 15.05 
E. E. Davis, surveying for water 

gates and chart, 100.50 
Balance, cash on deposit in the First 

National Bank of Northampton 1,622.15 



$6,055.95 

The total cost of the water works to January 1, 
1916 is $63,305.72. We have replaced the one-inch pipe 
on the Biver Boad from the house of H. G-. Moore 
north to Whateiy line laying 1520 feet of four inch 
pipe at a cost of $810.61. 

There are now 436 connections with private pro- 
perty, 109 fire hydrants, 5 water tanks and water in 
all school houses, Town hall and Memorial hall. 

There are now 18,781 feet of 8 inch pipe 

49,680 feet of 6 inch pipe 

38,658 feet of 4 inch pipe 

1,757 feet of 2 inch pipe 

7,206 feet of 1 inch pipe 

1,070 feet of % inch pipe 



117,152 feet 

J. W. KILEY, 
M. J. PBOULX, 
CHAS. W. WADE, 

Hatfield Water Commissioners. 
Hatfield, Mass., January 1, 1916. 



50 



I have this day examined the books and accounts 
of the Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the 
Town of Hatfield, and find them correct, with vouch- 
ers on file for all payments made. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, January 6, 1916. 



List of Boooks and Magazines Added to the 
Library since January 1st, 1915 



FICTION 



Barnaby Rudge 

Bleak House 

Child's History of England 

Christmas Books 

David Copperfield 

Domby and Son 

Great Expectations 

Little Dorrit 

Martin Chozzlewit 

Nicholas Nickleby 

Oliver Twist 

Old Curiosity Shop 

Our Mutual Friend 

Pickwick Club 

Tale of Two Cities 

Johnny Appleseed 

Turmoil 

Rose Garden Husband 

Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley 

Heart of Uncle Terry 

Harbor 

Nature's Garden 

Blue Bird 

Hepsy Burke 



Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Charles Dickens 

Eleanor Atkinson 

Booth Tarkington 

Margaret Widdemcr 

Bell K. Maniates 

Charles C. Munn 

Ernest Poole 

Neltje Blanchon 

Georgette Leblani 

F. N. Westcott 



52 



Secret of the Beef 

Contrary Mary 

Anelia's Business 

Girl of the Blue Ridge 

Pollyanna Grown Up 

Snodown Slim 

Man who Forgot 

Thankful's Inheritance 

House of the Misty Star 

Bred of the Desert 

Idyl of Twin Fires 

Far Country 

Elsbeth 

Billie's Mother 

Rim of the Desert 

On the Trail 

Turn of the Tide 

Cross Currents 

Phoebe and Ernest 

Phoebe Ernest and Cupid 

Goodly Fellowship 

K 

Penelope's Postscrips 

Invaders 

Mary Ware's Promised Land 

Martha by_the-Day 

Martha and Cupid 

Making over Martha 

Anne of the Island 

Her Wings 

Rainbow Trail 

Michael O'Halloran 

Money Master 

Aunt Jane 

Hearts Kindred 

Hempfield 



Harold Bindlose 

Temple Baily 

Henry Sydnor Harrison 

Payne Erskine 

Eleanor H. Porter 

Henry H. Knibbs 

James Hay Jr. 

Joseph C. Lincoln 

Frances Little 

Marcus Horton 

Walter P. Eaton 

Winston Churchill 

Margaret Muller 

Mary J. H. Skrine 

Ada Woodruff Anderson 

Adelia and Lina Beard 

Eleanor H. Porter. 

Eleanor H. Porter 

Inez H. Gilmore 

Inez H. Gilmor^ 

Rachel C. Schauffler 

Mary R. Rinehart; 

Kate Douglas Wiggin 

Newton S. Allen 

Julia M. Lippman 

Julia M. Lippman 

Julia M. Lippman 

L. M. Montgomery 

Frances N. S. Allen 

Zane Gray 

Gene Stratton Porter 

Gilbert Parker 

Jannette Lee 

Zona Gale 

David Grayson 



53 



Making Money- 
Fortunes of Garin 
Obsession of Victoria Gracen 
Harding of Allenwood 
Gray Dawn 
Heart of the Sunset 
Lotta Embury's Career 
Over Paradise Ridge 
Beltane the Smith 
Sandsy's Pal 
Bent Twig 



Owen Johnson 

Mary Johnson 

Grace L. H. Lutz 

Harold Bindloss 

Stewart E. White 

Rex Beach 

Marie T. Daviess 

Jeffry Fernol 

Gardner Hunting 

Dorothy Can-field 



BOY'S BOOKS 



Danforth Playing the Game 

Prisoners of War 

Arnold's Little Brother 

Quarterback Reckless 

Fair Play 

Boy Scouts of Snow-Shoe Lodge 

Boy Scouts of Bobs Hill 

Boy Scouts of Black Eagle Point 

Indian Today 

Little Comrade 

Boy Scouts on Swift River 

Motor Boat Club of the Kennebec 



Ralph H. Barbour 

Everett Tomlinson 

Edna A. Brown 

Hawley Williams 

Hawley Williams 

Rupert S. Holland 

Charles P. Burton 

Quirk 

Charles P. Eastman 

Burton E. Stevenson 

Thornton W. Burgess 

H. Irving Hancock 



GIRL'S BOOKS 



Sunbridge Girls at Six Star Ranch 

Boarded Up House 

Just Girls 

Helen and the Uninvited Guest 

Winona of the Campfire 



Eleanor Stuart 
Augusta H. Seaman 

I. T. Thurston 
Burtha B. Gilchrist 
Margaret Widdemer 



54 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

Child's Book of American Biography Stimpson 

Little Bear Laura R. Smith 

Bunny Boy and Grizzly Bear Laura R. Smith 

Bunny Bright Eyes Laura R. Smith 

Mother West Wind's Animal Friends Thornton W. Burgess 

Mother West Wind's Neighbors Thornton W. Burgess 

Mother West Wind's Children Thornton W. Burgess 

Little Colonial Stories Annie P. Johnston 

Adventures of Johnny Chuck Thornton W. Burgess 

Adventures of Reddy Fox Thornton W. Burgess 

Adventures of Jerry Muskrat Thornton W. Burgess 

Three Little Cotton Tails Thornton W. Burgess 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Book of Knowledge (20 volumes) 

From Pioneer home to White House 

Work that is Play 

Great Cities of Europe 

Art and Life Primer 

Miscellaneous Writings 

First Church of Christ Scientist 

Life of Mary Baker Eddy 

Bird Book 

Lure of the Land 

New Business and Law 

Spell of the Holy Land 

Belgium 

Play in Education 

Acres of Diamonds 

American Spirit 

What Women Want Beatrice 

Training the Girl 

Natural Education 



Wm. M. Thayer 

Mary Gardner 

Esther Singleton 

Nelly C. Jacobs 

Mary Baker Eddy 

Mary Baker Eddy 

Sibyl Wilbur 

Chester A. Reed 

Harvey W. Wiley 

Rowe and Loomis 

Archie Bell 

R. C. K. Ensor 

Joseph Leo 

Russel H. Conwell 

Edward A. Stein er 

Forbes-Robertson Hale 

William A. McKeever 

Winnifred S. Stoner 



55 

World's Best Poems (5 volumes) 

Pentecost of Calamity Owen Wister 

Stereographs (Underwood and Underwood) 

Pictures of the Papama Canal 

Pictures of the Hawaiian Islands 

Pictures of the Philippine Islands 

These and other views can be taken from the Library the 
same as books. 



Magazines and Periodicals in the Library 

Harper's Magazine 

Century Magazine 

St. Nicholas Magazine 

John Martin's Magazine 

Outing Magazine 

The National Georgraphic Magazine 

Something to Do Magazine 

The American Boy 

The Youth's Companion 

Good Housekeeping Magazine 

The American Magazine 

Everybody's Magazine 

Popular Mechanics Magazine 

Our Dumb Animals 

MRS. MARGARET A. MULLANY, Term Expires 1916, 
IRVING A. FLINT, Term Expires 1917, 
MISS MARGARET A. RYAN, Term Expires 1918, 

Trustees 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for 
the year 1915 are as follows : 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 





No. 


Males 


Females 


January, 


12 


7 


5 


February, 


8 


4 


4 


March, 


11 


5 


6 


April 


4 


2 


2 


May, 


8 


4 


4 


June, 


3 


1 


2 


July, 


5 


1 


4 


August, 


8 


3 


5 


September, 


5 


1 


4 


October, 


8 


4 


4 


November, 


7 


4 


3 


December, 


13 


6 


7 




92 


42 


50 



57 
BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 



a in United States, 


Father 
17 


Mother 

18 


Poland, 
Ireland, 


65 
1 


63 
1 


Hungary, 
Germany, 
Canada, 


7 
2 



7 
2 
1 



92 92 

BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 
79 69 74 81 93 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

No. 

January, 4 

February, 6 

March, 

April, 1 

May, 3 

June, 4 

July, 2 

August, 3 

September, 3 

October, 7 

November, 5 

December, 

38 



58 

First marriage of both parties' 35. 

Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 3. 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 47 and 2.1 
years of age respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 36 and 18 
years of age, respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 





Groom 


Bride 


Born in United States, 


5 


8 


Poland, 


26 


24 


Austria, 


6 


6 


India, 


1 






38 



38 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 



1910 


1911 1912 


1913 


1914 




26 


22 32 


26 


33 






DEATHS BY MONTHS 








No. 


Males Females 




3 


1 




2 


y, 


5 


3 




2 




4 


1 




3 




5 


3 




2 

















2 


1 




1 




3 


3 









7 


5 




2 



59 



September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 



Under 1 year of age, 
Between 1 and 10 years, 
Between 10 and 20 years, 
Between 20 and 30 years, 
Between 30 and 40 years, 
Between 40 and 50 years, 
Between 50 and 60 years, 
Between 60 and 70 years, 
Between 70 and 80 years, 
Between 80 and 90 years, 
Between 90 and 100 years, 



1 


1 





3 


2 


1 











o 





3 


36 


20 


16 


STo. 


Males 


Females 


12 


7 


5 


2 


2 





1 


1 





4 


3 


1 











4 


1 


3 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 





5 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 






36 



21 15 

Age of oldest person deceased, (male) 93 years, 
5 months, 5 days. 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



Kristini Petcen 
Elvira Dickinson 
John J. Bestold, Jr. 
John Arthur Boyle 
Margaret O'Neil 
Annie Kosior 



Lena LaMountain 
James Ryan 
Anthony Solinsky 
Horace Shumway 
Roswell T. Pelky 
John H. Howard 



60 

Joseph Popko Josephine Sadoski 

Mary A. Dickinson William B. Langdon 

Michael Pwatka Mary Ann Carl 

Katherine Vachula Joseph Knobosiak 

Estelle S. Harris Jnlius Pelis 

Leon Zaskey Michael Hrachy 

Laura Tufts Graves Eva Bestold 

John Vachula Charles E. Crafts 

Bridget Owevzki Elizabeth Lovett 
Frank C. Boyle 

DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year end- 
ing November 30, 1915, with the receipts and settle- 
ments of the account with the County Treasurer, is as 
follows : — 

60 male dogs at $2 each, $120.00 

4 female dogs at $5 each, 20.00 



$140.00 
Less fees, 64 dogs at 20 cents each, 12.80 



Paid County Treasurer, $127.20 

Eespectfully submitted, 

l! h. kingsley 

Town clerk, 



Assessor's Report 



Value of assessed personal estate, $ 485,628 
Value of assessed real estate, 1,562,018 



Total value of assessed estate, 




$2,047,646 


Value of assessed buildings, 


$850,479 


Value of assessed land, 


711,539 






$1,562,018 


Number of polls assessed, 




758 


Residents assessed on property, 




416 


Non-residents, assessed on property, 


^ 81 


For poll tax only, 




~465 


Rate of tax per $1,000, 




$21.70 


Number of horses assessed, 




504 


Cows, 




269 


Neat Cattle, 




8 


Swine, 







Fowls, 




201 


Dwelling bouses, 




385 


Acres of land, 




9,258 



62 



State Tax, 
County Tax, 
Town Tax, 

Overlaying^. 


Corporation 


$4,194.79 
3,461.98 

37,291.00 
1,002.15 


Estimated Bank and 
Excise Tax, 


$45,949.92 

Tax. 800.00 
752.96 



Value of property exempt from taxation under 
Chapter 490, Acts of 1909. 
Literary institutions, $76,733 

Church property, 31,650 



$108,383 



Respectfully submitted, 
EDSON W. STBONG 
P. W. MULLINS 
L. H. KINGSLEY. 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE- 



School Committee 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



-OF THE- 



Town of Hatfield 



-FOR THE- 



Year Ending December 31, 1915 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Arthur R. Breor, Chairman, Term expires 191.6 

John F. O'Dea, Secretary, Term expires 1917 

Oscar E. Belclen, Term expires 1918 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Clinton J. Richards, 



77 Main St., Hatfield, Telephone 36-2 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield 

schools). 
C. A. Byrne, M. D. (Hill, Bradstreet and West Hatfield 

Schools). 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

S. W. Kingsley. 



Report of School Committee 



At the annual meeting Oscar E. Belden was elected 
as a member of the school committee in place of Thad- 
deus Graves who had served faithfully for several 
years and whose relations with the other members of 
the committee were very friendly and helpful. 

At their first meeting, the committee organized for 
the present year with Arthur K. Breor as chairman and 
John F. O'Dea as secretary. The time for their regu- 
lar meeting was fixed for the first Thursday of each 
month. 

Starting in this year we find ourselves with much 
improved school accommodations. The new building 
greatly relieves the problem of former years. The 
school grounds have been graded and cement walks 
and steps placed around the building. This adds very 
much to the appearance of the building. 

The old building on School Street has been found 
to be very convenient for the use of the evening school. 
After some discussion it was decided to use the old 
building instead of the new one for the evening school. 
This made some extra expense as the building had f o 
be wired for electric lights and seats arranged for the 



67 

larger pupils. The evening school was continued for 
only six weeks with an enrollment of about 125. This 
coming year we expect to open the school in the same 
place about Feb. 1, and continue for eight weeks. 

During the year all buildings were inspected and 
the repairs made that seemed most necessary. All 
floors were oiled, new seats were placed in the West 
Hatfield grammar room- new windows provided for 
the North Hatfield Primary, and the Bradstreet build- 
ing given a much needed coat of paint and some gen- 
eral repairs made inside. 

At Bradstreet the sanitary conditions are far 
from satisfactory. The outhouses are about ready to 
fall down and new ones must be built before long if 
nothing else is done. (But with a little extra expense 
modern conveniences could be installed and this would 
seem to be the most satisfactory plan. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending Dec. 31, 1915 

Resources 

From State- for Superintendent of Schools, $ 535.72 

From State for State School Fund, 664.41 

Dog tax refunded, 126.77 

Tuition, 301.60 

Tickets sold, 20.51 

for Damages and supplies sold, 4.75 



68 

A. N. Palmer Company refund, 19.20 

Town appropriation, 10,000.00 



Total resources 


> 




$11,675.96 




Expenditures 




Teachers, 




$ 


6,879.00 


Superintendent of Schools, 




750.03 


Supervisors, 






447.00 


Janitors, 






1,195.63 


Books and supplies, 






1,053.36 


Fueh 






1,054.40 


Repairs, 






678.99 


Transportation, 






165.82 


Safe, 






60.00 


Miscellaneous, 


ires, 




259.55 


Total expenditr 




$ 12,543.78 



Overdrawn, $ 867.82 

ARTHUR R, BREOR, Chairman. 



Report of the 

Superintendent of Schools 



According to a recent state law the fiscal year of 
Massachusetts towns ends with the calendar year on 
December 31. The school year, however, on which our 
annual report to the state is based closes on June 30. 
The report to the town covers only the fiscal or calen- 
dar year 1915, including the last part of the school year 
1914-15, and the first part of 1915-16. This may lead 
to some misunderstanding, but in this report the calen- 
dar year 1915 is meant unless otherwise specified. 

Because of the greatly improved conditions of sup- 
port and housing it has been without doubt one of the 
most satisfactory years in the histroy of Hatfield 
schools. 

THE CENTRAL BUILDING 

This building was opened in Jan., 1915, and has 
been in operation long enough for us to judge fairly 
of its value. From a builder's standpoint it reflects 
much credit on its designer, constructors, and especial- 
ly on the building committee who were in charge of the 
whole operation. From a school man's point of view, 



70 

it leaves but little to be desired. The interior arrange- 
ments are very pleasing and convenient, and the sani- 
tary requirements as to heat, light' and ventilation are 
fully met. If an assembly room could be added with- 
out injuring the architectural effect, it would be one 
of the most valuable features of the building both for 
the school and the community. 

It is evident to all of our citizens that the large ap- 
propriation for this building was entirely justified and 
has been wisely expended. 

I have one further suggestion to make concerning 
the building, — that it be given a name. The term 
"Central" has nothing distinctive about it. A school 
should have a local name which would be generally re- 
cognized as fitting, or else it might be named after 
some person famous in our country's history. 

TEACHERS 

Miss Allaire of the Central School has devoted her- 
self untiringly to the school and has proved to be a 
most efficient principal. The addition of an assistant 
has given her more time for administrative duties and 
made her work more satisfactory and effective. Much 
credit is also due to the other teachers in the building 
who have co-operated intelligently with her in the dif- 
ficult work of organizing the new school. 

Only three resignations have occurred this year. 
These were Miss Gladys Rice of the Hill Primary, Miss 
Margaret McGrath of the West Hatfield Grammar, and 
Miss Gladys Rand of the Bradstreet school. Miss 



71 

Proulx was transferred to the Hill Primary and her 
place at the West primary has been taken by Miss 
Alice Keating of Northampton, a graduate of the West- 
field Normal School. Miss Georgia Gates of Ludlow, 
a teacher of successful experience, was chosen for the 
West Hatfield Grammar, and Miss Mary B. Woods of 
this town was assigned to Bradstreet. 

The entire teaching force of the town are working 
very effectively. The standards of instruction are 
high and improving, and the discipline maintained is 
excellent. 

JANITOR SERVICE 

Next in importance to the service rendered by the 
teachers is that of the janitor. The health, comfort, 
safety, and efficiency of both teachers and pupils de- 
pend largely on the care and intelligence of the janitor, 
and his selection should be made with nearly as much 
care as that of the teacher. 

EVENING SCHOOL 

The large enrollment in the evening school is suffi- 
cient evidence of the desire of our foreign-born popula- 
tion to avail themselves of its privileges. No one could 
visit the school without being impressed with the ear- 
nestness as well as the intelligence and good spirit of 
,the pupils. They were evidently there fore business 
and there was no disposition to trifle with the oppor- 
tunity offered. If the results of the instruction could 
be measured, it would probably be found that they are 



72 

greater in proportion to cost than in any other field of 
educational work. Another session of evening school 
will open in February, 1916. 

TEXT BOOKS 

By purchase and exchange new books have been 
secured in most subjects. Here as elsewhere the best 
is the cheapest in the end. 

The Hutchinson physiologies are being used in se- 
veral schools and their introduction will be completed 
this year. These books present the subject in an in- 
teresting manner and give special attention to the sub- 
ject of hygiene. 

The old language books which were well worn and 
unsatisfactory in contents have been replaced by the 
Miller-Kinkead series. They are among the best of the 
modern oboks on this subject. 

The Howe Eeaders are among the cheapest as well 
as best on the market. They have been adopted for 
supplementary use. 

HEALTH 

Much has been done to improve and safeguard the 
health of our children through the eye and ear tests 
given by teachers and the expert medical inspection 
and advice of our school physicians. The sanitary con- 
ditions in the older buildings could be much improved 
in some ways. The most marked improvement would 
be the substitution of indoor toilets for the present 
out-buildings. The Bradstreet school seems to be most 
in need of this improvement at the present time. 



73 

Physicians tell us that much of the disease among 
children can be traced to defective teeth. Dental in- 
spection is authorized by law and many towns are fur- 
nishing both inspection and treatment. Dental inspec- 
tion and advice could be given to all our children un- 
der the direction of our school physicians at a small 
cost, and the experience of other towns would warrant 
us in attempting it this year. 

It is a matter for congratulation that the town has 
fully complied with the state law that requires all 
school children to be vaccinated except those having 
certificates of exemption. To neglect this would not 
only be a plain disobedience of law but also a failure to 
observe one of the most approved means for the pre- 
vention of disease. 

SCHOOL YEAR 

The element of time in education is not so import- 
ant as the methods and organization of the work, and 
the degree of application of teachers and pupils. 3ut 
we can not fairly claim that our schools are so well or- 
ganized and taught and that our pupils are so excep- 
tionally industrious that they can make the same pro- 
gress in a school year of thirty-six weeks as those of 
other towns that have a school year of from thirty- 
eight to forty weeks. I would recommend that thirty- 
eight weeks be made the length of the school year. 

COURSE OF STUDY AND GRADING 

The state course of study for the first six grades, 
referred to in last year's report' has been issued only 



74 

in provisional form and not for general distribution 
and use. It is being worked out very carefully by 
groups of superintendents and we have some reason to 
hope that we may have it as the basis of our work and 
grading for another year. In the meantime we are us- 
ing the samee ourse that has been followed for the last 
four years. The State Board of Education will also is- 
sue outlines for the seventh and eighth grades which 
will continue the work outlined for the first six grades. 
This upper grade work will articulate closely with the 
high school and will be differentiated somewhat ac- 
cording to the pupil's plans for high school or for his 
vocation in life. 

There is a growing tendency to reduce the number 
of grades in the elementary schools from nine to eight. 
Many — perhaps most — pupils could cover the work ne- 
cessary for admission to high school in eight years. A 
year saved in the elementary schools means the same 
as one saved in the later and more expensive period 
of one's education. In case some cannot finish the 
required work in eight years and have to repeat for 
one year, they are still taking no more time than un- 
der the present system, and it is obviously unfair to re- 
quire a part of the pupils to mark time for one year 
because of those who are slower or less industrious. 
Many of the children who enter the first grade without 
any knowledge of the English language will have to 
repeat the work of one or more grades but this would 
be necessary whatever the number of grades. 



75 
PRACTICAL ARTS 

By the term " practical arts" is meant any kind 
of useful work involving more or less manual labor. 
All normal boys and girls enjoy some form of manual 
activity and this work is presented to them not as a 
requirement but as a privilege. The tendency of an 
education that is confined to books is to promote false 
ideas of work. It trains boys and girls away from 
manual labor. They get the notion that it is unworthy 
and to be avoided, if possible. The carrying on of 
some work in practical arts will tend to correct such 
false impressions and will give our children the right 
attitude towards those vocations that involve honest 
and necessary labor. 

Such work also arouses local interest, correlates 
the activities of the home and the school, and promotes 
a better understanding between them. It also has a 
"pre-vocational' J value in that it helps the child dis- 
cover his tastes and aptitudes for different kinds of 
work and occupations. In addition to this it affords 
opportunities for practical applications of other sub- 
jects. Where the work in any line of practical arts 
has been carried on successfully, it has added to ra- 
ther than taken from the value of the regular school 
subjects. 

The kind of work chosen depends not only on the 
pupil's taste and surroundings but also on the teach- 
er's preparation and ability. The instruction which 
the upper grammar grades at the Center school are 
getting in cooking belongs to this kind of work as 



76 

does also the re-eaning of chairs as being done by the 
fifth grade in the same school. Two years ago some 
very creditable work was done by the pupils of the 
Center grammar school where the girls took sewing 
and the boys woodworking. Various other projects 
have been undertaken by other schools in town. 

In a country town where some land is available for 
nearly every home, the making and caring for a garden 
is one of the most attractive and profitable forms of 
practical arts. The lack of supervision during the 
summer vacation has prevented this work from being 
as profitable as it should have been. I hope that some 
arrangement can be made for volunteer supervision 
if the work is attempted another year. 

SUPERVISORS 

There are certain subjects in which it is generally 
conceded that teachers should receive help and direc- 
tion from special teachers or supervisors. The three 
subjects for which we employ supervisors are music, 
drawing, and penmanship. The supervisors in all these 
subjects are doing very satisfactory work and our 
teachers without exception are co-operating intelli- 
gently with them. Without such co-operation the ef- 
forts of the supervisors would be of but little if any 
value. 

Fortunately no argument is necessary to convince 
the people of Hatfield of the value of music and draw- 
ing. But only recently it was thought profitable and 
best to engage the services of a special teacher in pen- 



77 

manship. The results that are being secured fully 
justify the comparatively small expense involved, and 
warrant the continuance of the present arrangement, 
if the services of Miss Kilmurry, who also supervises 
penmanship in the Northampton schools, can be re- 
tained. 

/ PLAY AND PLAYGROUNDS 

All educators are agreed as to the important part 
that play has in the education of the child. It aids in 
the development of all his powers, and makes him more 
efficient in his work. In all our schools the teachers 
supervise the play of the children to some extent at the 
noon and recess periods. 

One of the most attractive and valuable features 
of the new Center building is the ample playground. 
This should be utilized during the long summer vaca- 
tion as a public playground. If some simple apparatus 
could be secured, and a competent person placed in 
charge of the grounds to have oversight of the chil- 
dren and to direct their play, it would be well worth 
while. It would afford the children a place where they 
could play freely and safely, and it would be a valuable 
factor in their education. In the school at West Hat- 
field there are more than fifty boys and girls of all 
grades. The yard is so small that there is no opportu- 
nity for free play. There is no place where the boys 
can play ball without danger to themselves and the 
nearby buildings. If a playground of even one acre 
should be secured for this school its influence for 
good would soon become apparent in the conduct and 
habits of the children. 



78 
CONCLUSION 

Superintendent Maxwell of New York has well 
said, "Education for efficiency means the development 
of each citizen, first as an individual, and second as a 
member of society. It moans bodies kept fit for ser- 
vice by appropriate exercise. It means that each stu- 
dent shall be taught to use his hands deftly, to observe 
accurately, to reason justly, to express himself clear- 
ly. It means that he shall learn 'to live cleanly, hap- 
pily, and helpfully, with those around him.' " 

Our highest ambition as citizens, officials, and 
teachers might well be to so direct all the activities of 
our schools as to realize in them this high ideal of edu- 
cation for efficiency. 

CLINTON J. RICHARDS. 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



In submitting a report of the musical work in the 
schools I will say that the course of study, which has 
been used in former years, is being carried along the 
same lines. 

The aim is to inspire in the child a love of good 
music; to preserve as long as possible the natural child 
voice; to acquire intelligent musical interpretation; 
and to teach sight singing. 

To obtain these results we must place before the 
class the best of material which will appeal to the 
moods of childhood and contain educational value. The 
pure head tone must always be required in chorus sing- 
ing. 

In order to present a song with good musical inter- 
pretation, the fundamentals of music and the text of 
the song should be thoroughly understood. 

Owing to the improvement in school conditions 
and the hearty c-operation of the teachers, good pro- 
gress has been made during the past year. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



Report of Supervisor of Drawing 



The outlines followed at the present time are the 
same as those used in the towns of Deerfield, Sunder- 
land, Whately, Northfield, Leyden, and Gill in Massa- 
chusetts and Hinsdale, N. H. They are practically the 
same as those used in the city of Boston, with the prob- 
lems varied according to the locality of these schools. 

The drawing work consists of nature study in the 
fall followed by design and just before Christmas con- 
struction work with applied design. In the mid-win- 
ter term illustrative sketching, object drawing, and 
action figure drawing are taken up, and during the 
spring Term more illustrative sketching together with 
picture study and nature drawing are taught. 

The work given the most attention in the upper 
grades is the design and object drawing, nature study 
including both of these. The object drawing trains the 
hand to obey the eye and makes the child more observ- 
ing. The design work enables the child to distinguish 
between good and bad design and instills in him a lik- 
ing for things beautiful in design and color. 

In the lower grades the work is to give freedom 
in handling pencil, scissors, and crayons, also to give 
drill in straight line drawing, to add to the child's 



81 

graphic vocabulary, and in the object drawing to aid 
him to see and draw large proportions correctly. 

In the picture study well-known pictures such as 
those by Reynolds, Landseer, Rose Bonheur, Velas- 
quez, Millet, and Corot are taken up. The lower 
grades simply look at the pictures and talk about them 
in a story telling way. The fourth and fifth grades 
study the life of the artist as well as his pictures, while 
the upper grades reproduce the pictures and study 
them to learn thee haracteristic style of the artist. 

This year just before Christmas a new form of 
construction or industrial work was taken up using 
crepe paper rope. This involved the application of 
color combinations taught in design. Mats, boxes and 
baskets were made' proving to be successful as well 
as interesting and instructive. 

In the fall a few nature drawings were sent in to 
a contest where children from schools all over the Uni- 
ted States and Canada competed. In this contest 
George Engelharclt of the ninth grade at the center 
school, Nellie Nartowicz of the sixth grade at North 
Hatfield, and Grace Stenglein of the ninth grade at 
West Hatfield won honorable mention badges. Such 
contests should encourage thee hildren to strive for 
better and more original drawings. 

Two lessons a week in drawing are given, the spe- 
cial teacher giving a lesson once in two weeks in the 
upper grades, and one lesson a month in the first and 
second grades. Since all other lessons are given by 
the regular teacher the credit for the thoroughness of 
the work done belongs to those teachers. 



82 

Although the improvement in drawing has been 
slow, still a marked improvement over the work done 
last year has been shown. The pupils seem to grasp 
more quickly the principles taught and bettter results 
are more readily obtained. The work done in the 
Hatfield schools has on the whole been quite satisfac- 
tory and much interest in the work has been shown by 
both teachers and pupils. 

ASENATH H. LANDERS. 



Report of Supervisor of Penmanship 



I find all teachers in our schools have made good 
progress in the teaching of penmanship. 

We are using pens and ink in primary grades 
thus making the work easier in the upper grades, in 
so much that all pupils will have mastered pen holding 
and position before entering the higher grades. In all 
grades we endeavor to make the writing automatic. 

The A. N. Palmer Company of New York issue Fi- 
nal Certificates to those pupils who are able to pass the 
required examinations. 

The work is at first corrected by the supervisor, 
and after the subject matter is carefully covered, the 
complete examination is sent to New York; if ac- 
cepted the pupil is awarded a diploma. A number of 
young people have so far qualified, and the number 
will be greatly increased before the close of .the pre- 
sent school year. 

I believe that by adhering strictly to the princi- 
ples underlying our present system of penmanship, 
the writing of the majority of the students will show 
great efficiency and character. 

I wish to thank the teachers, who by their co-op- 
eration have made it possible to obtain good results. 

ANNA L. KILMURRY. 



Report of Medical Inspectors 



In many respects we have noticed progressive 
improvement in the physical condition of the children. 

Much can be said of the improvement of the con- 
ditions about the throat. 

The continual examination and notification of par- 
ents has led to better care, and the remedying of the 
faults of structure and inflammation. 

A little better co-operation of parents in regard to 
care of teeth is desirable; the preservation of the first 
set being so important to the perfection of the second 
set, and in keeping the contour of the mouth. 

A few "don'ts" for the guidance of tired mothers 

DON'T send a child to school who is not able or 
willing to play. 

DON'T send a child to school who refuses nis 
breakfast. 

DON'T take a child in winter to inclosed public 
places of amusement. 

If a child complains of chilliness DON'T blame 
it all to the weather; the child may be sick. 

DON'T send a child with a serious cough to 
school. 

CHAS. A. BYRNE, 
A. J. BONNEVILLE. 



85 



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Hatfield School 
Rules and Regulations 



SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS 

1. The Superintendent of schools shall have the 
care and supervision of schools under the direction 
and control of the School Committee, and shall be 
their executive officer. 

2. He shall visit the schools as often as his other 
duties will permit to obtain a personal knowledge of 
their condition and to assist the teachers in the per- 
formance of their duties. 

3. He shall have a voice in the councils of the 
Committee, nominate teachers, recommend textbooks 
and have charge of the administration of the course of 
study, and of the grading, classification, and promo- 
tion of pupils. 

4. He shall acquaint himself with whatever con- 
cerns the interest and progress of popular education 
and may call meetings of the teachers for the purpose 
of advising in regard to the best methods of instruc- 
tion' discipline, and school management. 



87 

5. He shall inspect the school premises, text- 
books and apparatus and report to the Committee and 
deficiency or condition unfavorable to the health or 
progress of pupils, with suggestions for correction 
or improvement. 

6, He shall assist the School Committee in keep- 
ing their records and accounts, and in making such 
reports as are required by law. 

PRINCIPALS 

1. In every school building containing two or 
more schools one teacher shall be appointed as Princi- 
pal. 

2. Principals shall have general charge of the 
schoolbuildings, grounds, and appurtenances of their 
respective schools. They shall have access to all parts 
of the school premises and inspect them at regular in- 
tervals of not more than one week, and shall give such 
assistance or directions as may be found necessary in 
the different rooms. 

3. They shall make rules, subject to the approval 
of the Committee, for the care and control of pupils in 
and around the school buildings and grounds, and may 
assign teachers and janitors to any special duties in 
and about the school premises. They shall especially 
provide for the control and supervision of pupils dur- 
ing the recess periods and noon intermission, both 
within the buildings and on the school grounds. 

4. They shall have charge of all books and sup- 
plies for their buildings, distribute them to the dif - 



88 

ferent rooms, and cans* and of the same 

to be made. 

5. Disoi apils may be - 
for con who alone shall fa 
the right oi -lision. 

6. Any principal who may find it necessary 

:L must immea ify the parents. 

and the School Commit! . giving 

the offense and the conditions imposed. Any ease of 
truancy should be immediate a Truant 

Officer and the Superintendent. 

-■'.'HERS 

1. Teachers shall be in thei is at 

l^ast fifteen minutes before the opening of the forenoon 
ancT afternoon sessions, or earlier when necessary. Any 
failure to arrive at the time required shall be tardiness 
and shall be so reported to the Principal and by her 
to the Superintend- 

They are to assist in the order of the halls and 
58 and shall respond quickly : the signal be 
There shall be no unnecessary talking in the halls 
either by teachers or pupils. They are expected to 
check disorder occurring at any time or place on 
school premises and the misconduct of any 

pupil, to whatever room he m ng. 

o. In the Center building at least tw< 
shall be on dutj ig each noon intermission. T\ 

shall have constant oversight of the p 
allowed to remain. 



89 

4. They shall prepare three copies of their daily 
schedule; one to be posted on the outside of the class 
room door or on the bulletin board, one to be kept at 
the desk' and the third to be handed to the Superin- 
tendent. After his approval, no material changes 
shall be made without his advise or consent. 

5. They shall require excuses from parents or 
guardians either in person or by written note in all 
cases of absence or tardiness. All excuses should give 
the cause of absence. Unexcused absences should be 
reported to the Truant Officer and Superintendent and 
be regarded as cases of truancy. 

6. There shall be kept at each teacher's desk, 
readily accessible for the inspection of school officials: 
the school register, program, seating plan, plan book 
and record of work, record of books and supplies, re- 
cord of pupils' standing together with some of their 
more recent written work. 

7. The Superintendent may grant to each teacher 
one day in each fall and winter terms to visit other 
public schools, and may designate the schools to be 
visited. Teachers who avail themselves of this per- 
mission shall make a written report to the Superin- 
tendent within one month of such visit, as to the 
schools visited and exercises observed with remarks 
and criticisms thereon. They are also allowed two 
days to attend state or county teachers' institutes or 
conventions. 

8. Whenever any teacher is tempororily absent 
from school, it shall be her duty to report at once to 



90 

the Committee or Superintendent, but in no case shall 
she furnish a substitute without the consent of the 
School Officials. 

9. Teachers shall observe carefully the ventila- 
tion, heat, and light of their rooms and endeavor to 
keep the temperature at about 68 degrees Farenheit. 
They may appoint pupils to keep a record of the ther- 
mometer on blanks provided for that purpose, but pu- 
pils should not be allowed to adjust the window shades 
or regulate the heat. 

10. Teachers should insist on care and economy 
in the use of books and supplies. As far as practic- 
able the interchange of books, pencils, and seat work 
material shall be avoided. Each pupil should be al- 
lowed to keep the same book that is first assigned 
him in any subject until he is ready for another or 
more advanced book. It should be marked plainly 
with his name so that it may be easily identified from 
term to term. 

11. Teachers shall be paid at the end of each four 
week period except at the close of a term when the 
time of payment may be varied. They shall notify the 
Superintenndent, before the time of making the pay- 
roll for any period, of any loss of time with the reason 
therefore. 

SUPERVISORS 

1. At the beginning of each school year Supervi- 
sors- acting with the Superintendent of Schools, shall 
prepare a program indicating the time to be given to 
each school, and a general outline of the work to be 
done in each department. 



91 

2 Each teacher shall be notified of the time when 
Supervisors may be expected at her school, and this 
time shall not be changed except for urgent reasons and 
after due notice. 

3. Supervisors shall notify the Superintendent of 
any loss of time or failure to meet engagements at the 
schools. 

PUPILS 

1. Pupils shall be considered under the joint ju- 
risdiction of teachers and parents when on the way to 
or from school. -They are not to leave the vicinity of 
the school buildings or grounds without permission oof 
teacher or principal. 

2. jSTo pupil shall enter any hall or room other 
than the one where he regularly belongs except by the 
special permission of his teacher. They shall not as- 
semble about the school buildings at any unreasonable 
time before the opening of school. After dismissal 
they shall go at once to their homes unless they remain 
by consent of teachers. The Principal may make any 
special rules necessary to carry the provisions of this 
section into effect, subject to the approval of the Su- 
perointndent. 

3. No pupil under the age of five years shall be 
admitted to school, and no pupil under the age of seven 
years shall be admitted by teachers to the first grade, 
after October 1st in any year, unless he is qualified to 
enter the classes already formed. But the Superin- 
tendent of Schools may admit such a pupil, when, af- 
ter investigation, he finds that the conditions seem to 
justify such action. 



92 

4. At the Center, pupils are not to be admitted 
into the new building until fifteen minutes before each 
session, except by special permission, or when neces- 
sary in cold or stormy weather. On entering they shall 
pass to their rooms without unnecessary delay and not 
leave without permission. They shall pass quietly 
through the halls and stairways at all times. 

GENERAL DUTIES OP JANITORS 

1. Janitors shall have the immediate care of 
school grounds, fences, apparatus, etc.' and shall act 
under the direction of their respective Principals, who 
shall see that their duties are properly performed. 

2. They shall keep the buildings clean and com- 
fortable, care for walks and steps in winter, make ne- 
cessary minor repairs and report promptly to the 
Principal any injury or defacing of the school pro- 
perty. 

3. They shall maintain as far as possible an even 
temperature of 68 degrees Farenheit during the day. 

JANITOR OP THE NEW BUILDING 

1. He shall have special, charge, under direction 
of the Principal, of the entire school premises. He shall 
make any minor repairs needed, report the need of 
more important repairs to the Principal and Com- 
mittee, and have the general supervision of all repairs 
and improvements to the building or grounds when- 
ever made. 

2. He should visit all rooms at least once during 
each session to observe the temperature. 



93 

3. He shall wind and regulate clocks; and dis- 
play the school flag as required by law. 

4. As far as possible he should keep walks and 
steps clear of ice and snow, sanding the same when 
necessary. In summer, lawns are to be kept smooth 
and neat by mowing and trimming as needed. 

5. He shall keep the building clean and orderly, 
sweeping halls and stairways daily if needed, and 
floors of classrooms thoroughly twice each week, or 
oftener as required. After sweeping floors, dust 
should be removed from all furniture with a dustless 
duster. At week ends lie should clean out chalk trays 
and remove the blackboard erasers to be cleaned. 
Blackboards should be washed at least once in two 
weeks, and waste baskets should be emptied when ne- 
cessary and returned to the rooms from which they 
were taken. Toilets and lavatories are to be kept clean 
and free from odor by flushing, cleaning' and the use 
of suitable disinfectants and deodorizers. 

6. He shall assist the Principal and teachers in 
every way possible to secure and maintain good order 
in and about the building, especially before the morn- 
session and during the recesses and noon intermis- 
sion. He shall have special oversight of the boys' 
toilet room during the recess periods and shall prevent 
any improper conduct or abuse of privileges. 

7. He shall have charge of the cleaning of the 
building during vacations and also have the special 
oversight and control of the school grounds at all 
times throughout the year. 



94 

GENERAL 

1. The hours for the school sessions of the gram- 
mar grades shall be from 9.00 A. M. to 12.00 M., and 
from 1.15 to 3.30 P. M. The sessions of the primary 
grades shall he determined by the School Officials in 
accordance with the needs and conditions of each 
school. 

A recess of not more than fifteen minutes shall be 
allowed in each half-day session. 

2. No circulars or advertisements shall be distri- 
buted in the school nor shall any collection or subscrip- 
tion be taken without the consent of the Superintend- 
ent. 

3. The use of tobacco in any form is strictly for- 
bidden in or about the school buildings. 

Approved by the School Committee of Hatfield, 
January 1, 191@. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



>F THE- 



TOWN OFFICERS 



>P THE- 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1916 






Hbrald Job Print 



Northampton, Mass. 






Finance Committee 



To the Voters of the Town of Hatfield:— 

Gentlemen: — The following appropriations and 
improvements are hereby recommended for the ensu- 
ing year by your Finance Committee. 

Obligations already voted on and to be assessed in 
1917:— 

Bradstreet and Chestnut Street Note, $2,000.00 

Main and Chestnut Street Note, 2,000.00 
Fourth payment and interest — New School 

Loan, 3,485.00 

Street Lights, 3,548.00 





$11,033.00 


Article 5. — Highways. 




Contingencies, 


$1,200.00 


Care Memorial Hall, 


150.00 


Bonds — Town Officers, 


90.00 


Salaries — Town Officers, 


1,600.00 


Care of Poor, 


1,200.00 


Interest, 


800.00 



Insurance, 150.00 

Inspection of Animals, 50.00 

Schools— Maintenance, 13,500.00 $18,740.00 

Article 7— Memorial Day, 75.00 

Article 10— Care of Cemeteries, 100.00 

Article 11— Public Library, 400.00 

Article 12— Muster Day, 75.00 

Article 14— School Physicians, 100.00 

Article 15— Smith Industrial School, 250.00 

Article 16— Fire Deps. Supplies, 800.00 

Article 17— Tree Warden, 100.00 

Article 18— Tuition— Smith Academy, 1,000.00 

Article 20— The sum of $3,000 to be used 
(in connection with $3,000 promised by 
the State) for constructing a perma- 
nent road of stone or gravel from Pine 
of roads east of onion store houses at 
line. Of this sum— $1,000 to be as- 
sessed on the polls and estates of the 
town for the year 1917, and $2,000 for 
the year 1919, 1,000.00 

Article 22— The sum of $2,500 to be used 
in constructing permanently of stone 
the highway, commencing at the fork 
of roads east of onion store house at 
West Hatfield, and going west under 
both R. R. underpasses. Of this sum — 



$500 to be assessed on the polls and es- 
tates of the town for the year 1917, 
and $2,000 from the balance in the 
town Treasury, 500.00 



$40,973.00 
Eespectfully submitted, 
JOHN C. EYAN, 
GEORGE S. BELDEN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Warrant for Town 
Meeting, February 5, 1917 



Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at 
said meeting. 

Article 2. — To choose all necessary town officers 
for the ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; 
one assessor for three years; Town Treasurer; one 
School Committee for 3 years; one Water Commis- 
sioner for 3 years; one Sinking Fund Commissioner 
for 3 years; one Trustee Public Library for 3 years; 
Auditor; Tree Warden; Elector, — Under the Will of 
Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; six Constables; and to 
vote on the question — "Yes" or "No" — Shall Li- 
censes be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in this town? All the foregoing to be voted for on 
one ballot. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the 
forenoon, and be kept open at least four hours, and for 
as much longer time as a majority of the voters pres- 
ent shall direct, but in no case shall they be kept open 
after the hour of sunset. 

Article 3. — To hear the reports of the various 
town officers and committees and act thereon. 



Article 4. — To receive and pass on town ac- 
counts. 

Article 5. — To take action in relation to main- 
tenance and repairs of highways and bridges the en- 
suing year, and raise and appropriate money for the 
same. 

Article 6. — To take action in relation to raising 
money and appropriating same to defray the necessa- 
ry expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8. — To take action in relation to support 
of the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and ap- 
propriate money for the same. 

Article 9.— To revise and accept the list of 
Jurors reported by the Selectmen. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for care of cemeteries for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the Public Library for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will vote to au- 
thorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue 
of the current financial year. 



8 

0B -&r$cle 14. — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for the employment of one 
or more School Physicians, in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

-(19 'till RO^DJ 

sdJ "lAHtele*!^. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hat- 
fiftlcii (CJiilflrie^i attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article l5o!r— To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for purchasing supplies needed by 
t^e Fire SepaWinent. 

-Vf. 

Article 17. — To see if the town will vote to raise 

alffl^pPi^Ka^'ftdiiey for Tree Warden work, 
(pi [urn 9BIR1 hnrfi /in*- 

Article 18. — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions and sup- 
plying books ror ftatnetd pupils in Smith Academy, 
who are of suitable age and attainments to attend 
Bfe&fSfchGdLi Uiw nwot 9 it) 

-xreaa <>}\Lio'\ aermteiim. lo 

Article 19. — To see if the town will vote to oil the 

stone roads of the town for the ensuing year, and raise 
aft& htppti&pftslAi 'm^'tfe^ i6i the same. 
~ume 9di -io! yimdid oilduS oil 

Article 20.— To see if the town will vote to raise 

and appropriate the sum of $3,000 for constructing a 
^rjk^m'B^Wmkf J or'^fel from Pine Bridge 
northerly toward *ttl£ "^ittfeiy 'line— or on any part 
betw^n^jsaidiip^initsj^-said ;tehim«to r Ibe raised as rec- 

ommtyft i^I«Wi|?P^ c fllfiP?W»l* ee » and t0 be 
Mtvift ^W 1 ^ t ^iiFi^jifee Ii pt^ u under provisions 
of Chap. 525, Acts of 1910^.^ Iguana 



9 

Article 21. — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $300 for repairs on the 
Cow Bridge road. 

Article 22. — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $2,500 to be used in con- 
structing permanently of stone the highway, com- 
mencing at the fork of roads east of onion store-houses 
and going west under both E. E. underpasses, — said 
sum to be raised as recommended by your Finance 
Committee. 

Article 23. — To see if the town will vote to aid 
financially the Hampshire County Farm Bureau in 
its task of educating our citizens how to raise the 
common necessities of life. 

Article 24. — To see if the town will vote to ratify 
the doings of the Board of Selectmen, in signing an 
agreement between the town and the Conn. Valley 
Street Eailway Co., on the care and maintenance of 
Kingsley's Bridge. 

Article 25. — To see if the town desires to bond 
any town official other than the Treasurer and Tax 
Collector. 

Article 26. — To see if the town will vote to build 
a sewer line for the accommodation of people living 
near Lovett's Hill and Bridge street, and raise and 
appropriate money for same. 

Article 27. — To see if the town will vote to in- 
struct the Selectmen to provide a traffic officer, to be 
on duty Sundays at some place on the State Eoad, in 
West Hatfield, for the purpose of stopping reckless 
auto-speeders. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: — 

In accordance with the requirements of the 
Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for 
the year ending December 31st, 1916, is respectfully 
submitted: — 

STATE AID. 
State Aid paid to three persons, $216.00 

POOR EXPENDITURES 



Aid — Cash paid, 


$ 67.00 


Fred J. Morgan, 


19.20 


Delia Mason, 


70.50 


James R. Coffey, 


40.00 


City of Holyoke, 


361.22 


Dickinson Hospital, 


71.50 


City of Chicopee, 


24.44 


City of Northampton, 


261.00 


H. W. Marsh, cash paid, 


3.16 


C. W. Wade, cash for clothing, 


2.00 


A. F. Warren, med. attd. 


4.50 



$924.52 



11 

DICKINSON HOSPITAL AND HAMPSHIRE 
COUNTY SANATORIUM 

(Under Chap. 637, Acts of 1912) 

Hampshire County Treasurer, $288.02 

Dickinson Hospital Treasurer, 290.00 



$578.02 



OLD BILLS 

American Car Sprinkler Co., oil, $ 10.00 

Hammond & Hammond, law, 21.00 

N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R, Co., car demurrage, 27.00 



$58.00 



PLANTING OF SHADE TREES 

Village Improvement Society, $25.00 

WATER RATES 

Superintendent, $500.00 

ORDINARY REPAIRS—HIGHWAYS AND 
BRIDGES. 

D. P. Sheehan, services Supt., team and 

labor, $1,018.51 

Alex Donnis, team and labor, 71.50 

M. H. Dwight, team and labor, 28.25 

C. H. Crafts, team and labor, 24.65 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 61.00 

John C. Ryan, team and labor, 68.75 



12 

H. E. Bardwell, team and labor, 34.20 

John F. O'Dea, team and labor, 27.50 

William E. Cutter, team and labor, 20.00 

John M. Strong, team and labor, 16.00 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 13.50 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team and labor, 38.25 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 235.50 

P. W. Mullins, team and labor, 35.75 

John L. Proulx, team and labor, 18.00 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 42.00 

C. W. Wade, team and labor, 36.00 

E. E. Donelson, team and lumber, 31.75 

J. B. Vollinger, team and labor, 15.50 

John L. Boyle, team and labor, 39.75 

Earnest Godin, team and labor, 7.50 

H. D. Smith, tile, team and labor, 37.97 

T. A. Nolan, team and labor, 18.00 

A. J. Breor, team and labor, 29.00 

H. W. Marsh, team and labor, 9.00 

A. H. Marsh, team and labor, 4.50 

John L. Sheehan, labor, 184.50 

Jacob Geis, labor, 85.00 

Michael Waskey, labor, 39.00 

Peter Miller, labor, 27.00 

Henry Wydella, labor, 30.00 

Charles Filepek, labor, 48.00 

George M. Franklin, labor, 39.50 

Henry Stoddard, labor, 80.88 

John Filepek, labor, 16.00 

Charles Kalisty, labor, 18.00 

Paul Lesoskosky, labor, 17.00 



13 



John Petcen, labor, 54.65 

Ludwik Krahel, labor, 27.00 

John J. Betsold, labor, 4.00 

M. J. Ryan, sup., 26 93 

Fred G. Howard, sup., 10.98 

John Borowski, labor, 4.00 

George A. Chandler, labor, 2.00 

Charles Wagner, labor, 3 00 

Peter Maziarski, labor, 8.00 

John J. Breor, labor, 21.00 

Samuel Osley, labor, 12.25 

Bazyli Buczyak, labor, 2.00 

Thomas W. Ryan, sand, 2.20 

Anthony Conger, labor, 8.00 

P. A. McGlynn, labor, 1 00 

Archie P. Graves, labor, 3.50 

S. W. Kingsley, labor, 7.55 

George Eberlein, labor, 16.60 

John J. Fortsch, sign, 2 00 

Angusta L. Carl, lumber, 77.50 

City Northampton, stone, 4.76 

Chase & Cooledge, oil, 6.60 

James P. Kelley, common, 5.00 

Charles T. Stowell, common, 35.05 

Samuel Blakesley, common, 6.00 

Robert Boyle, common, 3 00 
E. W. Strong, gravel, jp^ 
Foster & Farrar, sup., ^ D Jftjgf 
Geo. B. McClannan, gravel, ^leaod .*% 
Buffalo Steam Roller Co., re^ ^ d HhfM ^ 
W. A. Bailey, brick, , " r ™ .5-Pft 



14 

Joseph F. Chandler, brick, 2.82 

James L. Day, brick, 3.50 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile, etv., 50.58 

E. L. Graves, ex. pd., .63 

Smith E. Briggs, saw, 1.00 

Wm. Fitzgibbons, plumb., 3.06 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co., culvert, 191.52 

S. H. Field, sand, 1.60 

Studabaker Co., rep., 3.50 

Northampton Iron Works, castings, 14.00 

M. C. Bailey & Co., boards, 2.75 



$3,341.28 



Use of Steam Roller at Sunderland, $412.50 
Received and due for work outside, 521.65 $934.15 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS AND CARCASSES. 

E. S. Warner, $277.00 

Fred T. Bardwell, 125.60 



$402.60 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

John F. O'Dea, labor at fires, $ 5.00 

Dennis Whalen, horse at fires, 42.00 

Eli Frenier, labor at fires, 20.50 

John J. Betsold, horse and labor, 21.00 

Marcus Gr. Mullins, wiring, 3.00 

R. E. Donelson, 21.00 

P. W. Mullins, horse at fires, 15.00 

Eddie Mageska, labor, 2.50 



15 

Howard Orman, labor, 2.50 

James L. McGrath, labor, 2.00 
Fred Wentzel, storing H. Wagon and labor, 13.00 

Thomas M. O'Dea, H. Wagon, 5.00 

H. W. Marsh, H. Wagon, 5.00 

C. H. Crafts, H. Wagon, 5.00 

Mrs. Jrmes Mullins, H. Wagon, 5.00 

Seth W. Kingsley, sup., 4.10 



SCHOOL EXPENDITUEES 



$171.60 



Clinton J. Richards, service as Supt., $630.00 

Clinton J. Richards, sundries, 55.21 

Mary L. Allaire, services as principal, 679.00 

Mary C. Leary, teaching, 415 00 

Doris J. Rand, teaching, 409.00 

Theresa Nolan, teaching, 350.00 

Mary B. Woods, teaching, 369.20 

Alice E. Keating, teaching, 350.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, teaching, 444 00 

Helen F. Riley, teaching, 264.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, teaching, 444.00 

Christine Hibbard, teaching, 264.00 

Gladys Jenney, teaching, 267.60 

Marian C. Billings, teaching, 42.00 

Margaret Woods, teaching, 21 60 

Grace W. Bardwell, teaching, 256.80 

Mary B. Powers, teaching, 81.00 

Constance C. Breor, teaching, 444.00 

Lena H. Proulx, teaching, 438.00 



16 

Georgia Gates, teaching, 459.00 

Marion Proulx, teaching, 2.40 

Nellie T. O'Brien, teaching, 264.00 

Mary G. Dickinson, teaching, 135.00 

Margaret L. Claire, teaching, 135.00 

Kathryn T. Lucey, teaching, 135.00 

Blanche E. Lyons, teaching, 180.00 

Mary D. Donelson, teaching, 180.00 

Nellie E. Salvas, teaching, 110.00 

Mrs. T. Graves, teaching, 7.80 

Mrs. E. L. Graves, teaching, 1.20 

Maude E. Boyle, music, 222.00 

Asenath H. Landers, drawing, 107.00 

Anna L. Kilmurry, writing, . b nr§&.5fS 

Teachers' Retirement Board, peivajtaPfbiiBttA .J[347*M 
John F. O'Dea, janitor,, ^mrfoBeJ mm T .rfiHM 

James P. Kelly, janitor, ^nfdoBsi ,bnB-H .1, SS-flft 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor, ^ n [ f b 6 oi .tu\WA r^B* 
Katherine Flynn, janitor, ^oidoaei ^booW rfM 
John Salvas, janitor, ^friffosert ^siHbqTL .^?4SA 

E(Jw$rd V. Slattery, janitor,^ nfrfonel f Tofr>T .V iW*fc& 
^ll'genier, janitor, ^nidoB9i f Y9liH . r tf $$Qft 

^.ft^Smith, coal, &tud$Bsi f flfivH .A Jl$69<9£ 

5feJ$£ Wolfram, coal, f ^nirbi5oi .bifiddiH 9nrt3M9) 
Jfo.W*: Strong, wood, ? ^nin r 9B9i /wrrr^T, ??-3J8ci9ft 

J^fe J. Betsold, wood, f -onff[oB9i ^flillrS .D /i/84j9& 
$#i^h Academy, domestic SGiflfM?^} f shooW -Ntb19<O0[ 
JjJ&ftfe'A. Howard, censi^niifoj39i Jfov/frifiH .W 1*8.85) 
JjpjhflB J- Mahoney, t ^nMoB9i ,3197™°! .9 t4j2& 

JfeejI^L Howard, sup., -ojjhhmi ? i09i9 .0 9oafil{QiZt) 



17 

0. E. Belden, S. Com. and rep., (1915), 22.00 

Charles E. Merrill Co., sup., 4.02 

Milton Bradley & Co., sup., 10.73 

E. E. Babb & Co., bks., 155.27 

Ginn & Co., bks., 26.16 

Educational Associates, bks., 10.00 

D. C. Heath & Co., bks., 13.11 
Houghton Mifflin Co., bks., 27.56 
A. S. Barnes & Co., bks., 8.68 
J. L. Hammett Co., sup.,, 412.48 
Amherst Gas Co., electricity, 47.42 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., teL, 36.75 
A. N. Palmer Co., bks., 22.97 
The Macmillan Co., bks., 11.07 
Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., tickets, 120.00 
A. F. Lovering, boiler inspection, 2.00 
Northfield Press, 8.35 
Silver Burdett & Co., bks., 2.94 

E. P. Dutton & Co., bks., 6.33 
George Eberlein, labor, 4.50 
Seth "W. Kingsley, labor, 5.95 
Phelps & Gare, 1.50 
A. Flannigan Co., bks., .60 
Theo. Presser Co.,, bks., 1.26 
Middle States Oil Co., oil., 10.21 
Wright & Potter, ptg., 1.56 
Brown-Gates Co., lamps, 8.00 
J. M. Strong, trans., 5.00 
John Vachula, trans., 3.00 
Lyons & Carhanan, bks., 12.11 
Daniel O'Neil, flag, 3.80 



18 

0. Belden's Sons, care grounds, 10.00 

C. B. Dolge Co., alta., 11.50 

J. F. O'Dea, S. Com., labor and cash paid, 43.68 

A. J. Bonneville, fumigating, 10 00 

A. J. Smith, S. Com., and trucking, 21.50 
John B. Bitner, labor, 4.00 
Charles Scribner's Sons, bks., 2.00 

B. H. Sanborn & Co., bks., 4.34 
Morgan Envelope Co., paper, 7.25 
J. A. Sullivan, sup., 5.80 
Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 17.73 
O. E. Belden, S. Com., labor and cash pd., 58.45 
Shumway & Riley, can, 6.48 
J. J. Curtis plumb., 23.97 
Wm. Fitzgibbons, plumb., 34.35 
Marcus G. Mullins, wiring, 40.00 
Foster-Farrar, sup., 7.55 

F. M. Crittenden, ptg., 4.80 
James S. Powers, labor, 116.46 
W. N. Potters Son, cement, 21.75 
Michael Dulaski, labor, 94.40 
Wm. P. Boyle, ptg. and rep., 73.88 
James L. Boyle, team and labor, 18.00 
W. H. Riley & Co., plumb., 316.38 

G. B. McClellan, gravel, 1.60 
Michael Dulaski,, labor rep., 20.25 
F. G. Vollinger, saw wood, 2.00 
Wm. P. Boyle, ptg. and rep., 118.43 
Atkinson, Metzger & Co., bks., 8.44 

$13,533.79 



19 
CONTINGENCIES. 

M. J. Proulx, police duty, $ 19.25 

Marcus G. Mullins, lamps Town Hall, 5.60 
Herald Job Print,, ptg. town reports, and 

ballots, 227.80 

Amherst Gas Co., electricity, T. Hall, 40.54 

P. R. Mullany, postage reports, stamp envl., 22.87 

H. L. Pellam, care town ball and clock, 55.50 

H. L Pellam, cash sawing wood, 4.25 

W. H. Riley & Co.,, stove T. Hall, 33.49 

Brown-Gates Co., bulbs, 8.54 

George Eberlein,, labor and rep., 16.80 

E. W. Strong, wood T. Hall, 16.50 

H. R. Waite, wood T. Hall, 14.00 
Herald Job Print, order book and tally shts., 24.00 

W. & L. E. Gurley, sealers sup., 3.06 

John B. Bitner, rep seats T. Hall, 2.80 

J. J. Curtis, rep. T. Hall, 1.20 

Wm. Fitzgibbons, rep. plumb., 12.07 

J. W. Heffernan, account bks., 4.00 

C. B. Dolge Co., disinfectants, 6.50 

Central City Chemical Co., disinfectants, 49.00 

Lathrop Mfg. Co., sweeping compound, 4.50 

Dora Schunec, clg., 6.00 

Northampton Commercial College, sup., 3.00 

Hobbs & Warren, sup., 4.63 

L. H. Kingsley, copy valuation book, 25.00 

P. Ahearn & Co., burial Wm. Norton, 30.00 

E. L. Prescott, ck. protector, 15.00 

N. Y. N. H. & H. freight, .55 



20 

C. H. Chase, nsal estate transfers, 6.15 

Seth W. Kingsley, police duty, 15.00 

Cha. I. Stowell, care Wilkie plot, 3.00 

Chas. Moline, fumigating, 12.00 

Johnson's Bookstore, Col. Tax Book, 2.05 

A. J. Bonneville, fumigating and med. attd. 55.00 

C. T. Bagnell, tax bills, 5.16 

Geo. P. O'Donnell, law, 10.00 

C. W. Wade, tel, and cash pd., 4.00 

L. H. Kingslep, serving Selectmen's Warrants, 20 00 

Dumping Grounds, 5 00 

fares, tel, ex. and sup., 16.92 

recording Births,, marriages and 

deaths, 70.50 

A. J. Bonneville, retng births and fumigating, 20.25 

Chas. A. Byrne, retng. births, 13.75 



$915.23 

BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 
H. L. Howard, bond for Treasurer, 40.00 

H. L. Howard, bond for Tax Col., 50.00 



$90.00 



REPAIRS STONE ROADS 



D. P. Sheehan, services as Supt., team and 

labor, $268.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team and labor, 27.00 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 103.50 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 5.50 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 40.50 



21 



P. W. Mullins, team and labor, 


49.75 


John C. Ryan, team and labor, 


33.75 


Howard E. Belden, team and labor, 


4.50 


H. W. Marsh, team and labor, 


10.50 


C. H. Crafts, team and labor, 


4.50 


Sam. Osley, labor, 


18.00 


John L. Sheehan, labor, 


82.50 


Henry Stoddard, labor, 


60.00 


Jacob Geis, labor, 


48.65 


John Petcen, labor, 


43.00 


Chas. Filepek, labor, 


34.25 


John Fusek, labor, 


40.00 


Mike Wasky, labor, 


15.00 


Ludwik Kraliel, labor, 


14.00 


Anthony Poka, labor, 


2.00 


Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 


36.00 


The Barrett Co., oil, 


109.00 


Geo. B. McClellan, gravel, 


1.60 


E. W. Strong, slabs, 


1.50 


J. S. Lans & Sons, stone, 


296.94 


Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone, 


21.68 


B. & M., ft., stone, 


16.63 


H. D. Smith, coal, 


69.15 



$1,457.40 

TREE WARDEN AND MOTH MILLERS 

Seth W. Kingsley, labor, $21.90 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 5.90 

J. A. Sullivan, saw and tools, 6.35 

Joseph Raboin, labor,, 23.64 



22 

Fred Wentzel, labor, 22.50 

M. J. Ryan, sup., 2.12 

P. J. Whalen, ex. to Boston, 10.00 



$92.41 



INSURANCE 



Harry L. Howard, ins., buildings, boiler 

inspec, $260.39 

MUSTER DAY 

M. J. Ryan, Chief— at Hadley, $37.50 

OILING STONE ROADS 
The Barrett Co., oil and applying, $1,144.37 

TOWN OFFICERS. 

H. D. Smith, services Selectman, (1915), $150.00 
Chas. W. Wade, services Selectman & W. 

Corns., 85.00 

H. W. Marsh, services Selectman, 75.00 

M. J. Proulx, services as W. Corns., 10.00 

J. W. Kiley, services as W. Corns., 10.00 

C. K. Morton, services as Elector, 10.00 

P. W. Mullins, services as Assessor, 85.00 

E. W. Strong, services as Assessor, 82.50 

L. H. Kingsley, services as Assessor, 176.25 

E. L. Graves, Tax Col. 1915, 150.00 
E. L. Graves saly. as Sealer of Wts. and Meas. 75.00 

Thos. W. Ryan, Registrar of Voters, 10.00 

Saml. F. Billings, Registrar of Voters, 10.00 



23 

R. W. Weber, Registrar of Voters, 10.00 

L. H. Kingsley, Registrar of Voters, 10.00 

Chas. I. Stowell, Ballot Clerk, 9.00 

Dennis E. Holl'ey, Ballot Clerk, 9.00 

Robt. J. McGrath, Ballot Clerk, 12.00 

Joseph E. Godin, Ballot Clerk, 12.00 

E. L. Graves, Ballot Clerk, 3.00 

John J. Fortsch, Ballot Clerk, 3.00 
L. H. Kingsley,, Town Clerk and Clerk ,Bd. 

Selectmen, 500.00 

Town Treasurer, 100.00 

L. J. Pelissier, Fish Warden, 1915-1916, 10.00 

George Eberlein, police duty, 10.00 



$1,616.75 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Fred G. Howard, team, 


$ 6.25 


H. L. Howard, team, 


3.00 


Amherst Gas Company, light, 


8.55 


Carrie Cutter, mag. club list and care, 


31.50 


The H. R. Huntting Co., bks., 


111.45 


Margaret A. Ryan, Asst. Librarian and bks 




bought, 


26.65 


J. W. Heffernan, bks., 


10.95 


Am. Book Co., bks., 


.38 


M. G. Overlook, bks., 


1.25 


L. H. Church, bks., 


5.00 


Metcalf & Co, tickets, 


2.36 


Bridgman & Lyman, bks., 


26,71 


Library Bureau, cards, 


.60 



24 



C. M. Barton, librarian, 143.60 

Nellie S. McGrath, asst. librarian, 21.75 



$400.00 

ENLARGING B£ADSTREET CEMETERY 

W. H. Langdon, sale of land, $100.00 

Reuben Belden, sale of land, 375.00 

A. H. Beers, surveying, 4.00 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 8.25 



$487.25 



NORTH MAIN STONE ROAD 

D. P. Sheehan, services as Supt. team and labor,$75.00 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 35.00 

John C. Ryan, team and labor, 38.90 

John L. Boyle, team and labor, 25.00 

John L. Proulx, team and labor, 32.50 

Alfred J. Breor, team and labor, 12.50 

Alex Donnis, team and labor, 30.00 

Edw. A. Ryan, team and labor, 32.50 

John L. Sheehan, labor, 22.00 

Henry Stoddard, labor, 24.75 

Mike Waskiewicz, labor, 4.00 

Ludwik Krahel, labor,, 4.00 

Joseph Jweczyk, labor, 5.00 

Geod. M. Franklin, labor, 20.00 

John Fusek, labor, 22.50 

Bazyli Buczyak, labor, 8.00 

Chas. Filepek, labor, 11.25 



25 



John Petcen, labor,, 


20.25 


Jacob Geis, labor, 


20.00 


M. C.Bailey & Co., grade stakes, 


6.24 


L. C. Warner, coal, 


29.54 


John F. O'Dea, sand, 


104.00 




$582.93 


Deposit Savings Bank, 


417.07 



$1,000.00 

SMITH INDUSTEIAL SCHOOL 
Tuition, $592.14 

CAEE OF CEMETEKIES 
F. H. Bardwell, Treas., $100.00 

TUITION— SMITH ACADEMY 
V. H. Keller, Treas., $1,000.00 

STEEET LIGHTS 
Amherst Gas Company, $3,556.34 

CARE MEMORIAL HALL 

H. D. Smith, coal, $64.25 

F. L. Woodruff, rep., 69.78 

L. H. Kingsley, Jan., 75.00 

$209.03 



26 
WASHOUTS 

D. P. Sheehan, services as Supt, team and 

labor, $120.0d 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 42.00 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 11.50 

John C. Kyan, team and labor,, 18.00 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 9.00 

H. E. Bardwell, team and labor, 15.50 

John F. O'Dea, team and labor, 6.50 

Alfred J. Breor, team and labor, 35.00 

John Fusek, labor, 20.50 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 31.75 

Jacob Geis, labor, 24.65 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 16.65 

Ludwik Krahel, labor, 10.00 

Henry Stoddard, labor, 10.00 

Mike Wasky, labor, 6.00 

Henry Wydella, labor, 12.00 

Peter Miller, labor, 8.00 

L. H. Kingsley, sand, 18.30 

M. J. Kyan, sand, 9.70 

C. H. Crafts, sand, .90 

$425.95 

MEMORIAL DAY 

C. K. Morton, $75.00 



27 




SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 




A. J. Bonneville, 


$50.00 


C. A. Byrne, 


50.00 



$100.00 
RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN— 1916 



State Aid 


$ 216.00 


Poor Expenditures 


924.52 


Hampshire County and Dickinson 


Hos- 


pitals 


578.02 


Water Rates 


500.00 


Planting of Trees 


25.00 


Contingencies 


915.23 


Schools 


13,533.79 


Ordinary — Highways and Bridges 


3,341.28 


Inspection of Animals 


402.60 


Repairs Stone Roads 


1,457.40 


Bonds — Town Officers 


90.00 


Insurance 


260.39 


Public Library 


400.00 


Streets 


3,556.34 


Salaries — Town Officers 


1,616.75 


Washouts 


425.95 


Old Bills 


58.00 


Tree Warden 


92.41 


Oiling Stone Roads 


1,144.37 


Smith Industrial School 


592.14 


Bradstreet Cemetery 


487.25 


Memorial Day 


75.00 



28 

Eepairs and care Memorial Hall 209.03 

North Main Stone Road 582.93 

Care of Cemeteries 100.00 

Tuition— Smith Academy 1,000.00 

Muster Day, Hadley 37.50 

School Physicians 100.00 

Fire Dept. 171.60 



$32,893,50 



Respectfully submitted, 
CHAS. W. WADE, 
JAMES L, DAY, 
H. W. MARSH, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



I have this day examined the books of the Sel- 
ectmen and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Audit. . 

January 2d, 1917. 



29 

LIST OF APPROPRIATIONS VOTED TO BE 
RAISED AT THE ANNUAL TOWN MEET- 
ING, HELD FEBRUARY 7th, 1916. 



75 fo 


r Memorial Day 


100 ,J 


Care of Cemeteries — under supervision 




of V. I. Society 


75 ' 


Firemen's Muster 


100 ' 


School Physicians 


250 ' 


Smith Agl. School 


100 ' 


' Supplies Fire Dept. 


100 ' 


Tree Warden and Spraying Work 


150 ' 


Care Memorial Hall 


60 ' 


Bonds — Town Officers 


225 ' 


Insurance 


250 ' 


Inspection of Animals and Carcasses 


25 " 


V. I. Society — Replacing shade trees 


25 " 


Dickinson Hosrrtal — Relief contributed 


500 ' 


Town Water Rates 


800 ' 


Interest 


400 ' 


Public Library- 


500 ' 


Improving Sanitary Conditions at 




Bratdstreet Schoolhouse 


600 ' 


Enlarging Bradstreet Cemetery 


1,600 ' 


Salaries — Town Officers 


1,200 ' 


Care of Poor 


1,000 ' 


Tuitions — Smith Academy 


1,000 ' 


Oiling Stone Roads 


1,200 ' 


Contingencies 


1,500 ' 


' Resurfacing and Repairing Stone 




Roads 



30 

2,500 ' ' Ordinary Eepairs — H i g li w a ys and 

Bridges 
1,000 " Stone or Gravel Construction on River 

Road — Assessed in 1916 
11,500 " Schools — Maintenance of and Dog 

Fund 



$26,835 Total sum appropriated in 1916, Feb 

7th. meeting. Previously voted on 
— and to be assessed in 1916. 

2,000 " Bradstreet Road Note— due May 22, 
1916. 

3,575 " 3d payment and Int. New School Build- 
ing — due June 30, & Dec. 31 

3,534 " Street Lights 

2,000 " Road Note— (Main, Chestnut, North & 
Dwight) due Aug. 7, 1916 

1,300 " Road Note — (Prospect, and School 
Bldg grading) due Aug. 7, 1916 



$12,409 



$39,244 Total sum to be assessed on the polls 

and estates of the town for 1916 



31 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT- 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD —1917 



Name 
Balise, Paul 
Boyle, George A. 
Boyle, William F. 
Breor, Arthur R. 
Carl, Henry W. 
Cutter, William R. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Deinlein, Lawrence A. 
Eldridge, Edwin H. 
Fitzgerald, David L. 
Fitzgerald, Thomas J. 
Langdon, William W. 
Marsh, Harry W 
Mullins, James 
Holley, Dennis E. 
O'Dea, T homas M. 
Proulx, M. Larkin 
Ryan, John C. 
Charles I. Stowell, 
Smith, Adam J. 
Slattery, Charles F. 
Sheehan, Daniel P. 
Wolfram, Henry W. 
Weber, Rudolph W. 
Wade, Charles W. 
Wells, Reuben F. 
Wight, Leland H. 



Occupation 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Clerk 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer and Slater 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Sexton 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 

Dr. 



To balance in Treasury, 




$ 1,399.91 


To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, 


Coll. 




(1915) 




15,213.17 


To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, 


Coll. 




(1916) 




33,230.40 


Treas, Water Commissioners, 




2,900.00 


District Court Fines, 




131.90 


Slaughter Licenses, 




7.00 


Jitney License, 




1.00 


Auctioneer's License, 




1.00 


Pool Licenses, 




6.00 


Licenses — Junk, Fruit, and Peddlers, 


157.00 


Hampshire County Jail fines, 




12.50 


Sealer's Receipts, 




70.06 


Rent Town Hall, 




109.25 


Martin Bucela, cemetery plot, 




.50 


Paul Cemek, cemetery plot, 




.50 


H. L. Pellam, sale of plank, 




.50 


E. L. Graves, labor, 




1.00 



33 

George Eberlein, cleaning ditch, 6.00 

L. J. Pelissier, sale of bulbs, 2.50 

John T. Burke, cleaning ditch, 2.00 

John Fusek, tile and labor on drain, 114.05 

H. E. Graves, tile and labor on drain, 20.00 

E. A. Breor, culvert and lab., 15.00 

Alfred B. Proulx, labor on washout, 80.00 

James L. Day, labor on water pipe, 15.25 

M. W. Boyle, labor, tile and culvert, 105.90 

Hampshire Mfg. Co., coal, 35.00 

A. H. Graves, labor and material washout, 111.50 

Town of Sunderland, use of S. Boiler, 412.50 

City of Northampton, tuition, 144.08 

Town of Whately, tuition, 155.1.7 

Eefunding Dog Fund, 102.89 

John F. O'Dea, sale of tickets, 38.48 

City of Boston, tuition, 6.75 

C. J. Bichards, sup., sold, 1.38 

State — Income Mass. School Fund, 577.19 

School— Supt. Union, 500.00 

State Aid, 170.00 

National Bank Tax, 791.37 

Corporation Tax, 471.39 

Corporation Tax, St. By., 689.75 

Tuition— Smith School, 175.00 

Inspection of Animals, 65.00 

Subsidies to Towns, (Hospital), 392.15 

Martin Wilks, sewer entrance and tile, 87.20 

Joseph Kirejzyk, sewer entrance and tile, 40.90 

John Wilks, sewer entrance and tile, 39.70 

Gabriel Toezko, sewer entrance and tile, 33.00 



34 

J. H. Cliarlebois, sewer entrance and tile, 100.50 
Stefan Karpenskie, sewer entrance and tile 42.25 
John Wesolowski, sewer entrance and tile, 44.60 
To cash rec'd from Temporary Loans 

North 'n Inst, for Savings, $10,000 

North 'n Inst, for Savings, 15,000 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 6,000 31.000.00 



$89,830.14 



Cr. 

By cash paid Selectmen's orders, $32,893.50 

Interest on Water Bonds, 2,000.00 

District Court Fees, 119.97 

Bureau of Statistics,, 6.00 

Soldiers' Exemption — charge, 9.19 

Interest on temporary loans, 983.24 

County Tax, 4,938.31 

State Tax, 3,600.00 

State Tax — Repairs Highways, 55817 

Treasurer Sinking Fund, 900.00 

Balance^ in Treasury, 2,529.69 
Dep. Savings Bank, acct. North Main Stone 

Eoad, 417.07 

By cash paid outstanding Notes: 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, bal. of Note, 5,000.00 

C. D. Parker & Co., Note, 2,000 00 

S. F. Mosely & Co., Note, 12,000.00 

North 'n Inst, for Savings, 2,000.00 

North 'n Inst, for Savings, 1,300.00 



35 

North 'n Inst, for Savings, 10,000.00 
North 'n Inst, for Savings, part paymt 

Note, 5,000.00 

3d Note and Int.— New Schoolhouse, 3,575.00 



$89,830.14 



IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1915 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $15,213.17 

Uncollected taxes, 1,123.01 

Assessors' orders of Abmts, 23.70 $16,359.88 



Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, $15,992.10 

Interest collected, 367.78 $16,359.88 



(1916) Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received, 33,230.40 

Uncollected taxes, 15,376.74 

Assessors' orders of Abmts, 60.45 $48,667,59 



Cr. 

By Assessors' Warrant, 47,826.59 
Addition to Warrant, 801.14 

Interest collected, 39.86 $48,667.59 



36 

I have examined the accounts of the Tax Col- 
lector, and find that he has been credited by the Treas- 
urer, with the amounts of $15,213.17 of the taxes of 
1915, and $33,230.40 of the taxes of 1916. 

CHAELES E. WAENEE, Auditor. 
January 2d, 1917. 

WATEE SINKING FUND 

To thirty years four per cent. Water Bonds, $50,000.00 
By Sinking Fund, 24,926.82 

SUMMAEY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

Dr. 

To outstanding Note, due June 20, 1917, $10,000.00 
Outstanding Note, clue Aug. 7, 1917, 6,000 00 

Bills due— estimated, 300.00 



$16,300.00 



Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, (1915) $ 1,123.01 

Uncollected taxes, (1916) 15,376.74 

Due from State Aid, 216.00 

State—Smith School, 296.07 

Sewer Assessments and labor, 328 00 
North Main Stone Road Fund, 417.07 

Balance in Treasury, 2,529.69 $20,286.58 



Balance in favor of the town, $3,986.58 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer. 



37 

I have examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the town of Hatfield for the year ending 
December 30, 1916, and find them correct. I find Sel- 
ectmen's orders on file to the amount of thirty-two 
thousand, eight hundred ninety-three dollars and fifty 
cents — ($32,893.50) with evidence of their payment by 
him; also, cancelled notes and receipts for County and 
State taxes and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the T reasury of twenty-five 
hundred and twenty-nine dollars and sixty-nine 
cents, ($2,529.69) and a Savings Bank Deposit of 
$417.04, for a North Main Stone Eoad Fund. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 2d, 1917. 



Report of Sinking Fund Commissioners 



We have the following amounts deposited to the 
credit of the Sinking Fund: 

Haydenville Savings Bank, $1,465.71 

Eosthampton Savings Bank,, 928.97 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,405.58 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 1,045.69 

Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,452.02 

Springfield Institution for Savings, 1,115.18 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 1,141.55 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Holyoke, 900.00 

Union Trust Co., Springfield, 2,472.12 

Springfield St. Railway Co., Bond, 1,000.00 

N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. Co., Bond, 2,000.00 

B. & M. R. R. Co., Bond, 3,000.00 

Town of Hatfield Water Bond,, 7,000.00 



$24,926.82 



M. J. RYAN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 
JOHN McHUGH, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

January 5, 1917. 

I have this day examined the Accounts of the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

CHARLES E, WARNER, Auditor. 



Water Commissioners Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the 
twenty-first annual report of the Board of Water 
Commissioners: 

We have received the past year as follows: 
Balance of cash on hand from 

last year's acct, $1,622.15 

Cach from Collection of Water 

rates, 5,309.39 

L. A. & S. F. Billings cash for 

pipe and hydrant, 92.11 

$7,023.65 



We have paid the past year i 


is follows: 


Town of Hatfield from water 




rates, 


$2,900.00 


R. D. Wood & Co., Iron pipe 




and specials, 


395.83 


Charles Miller & Son Co., lead, 


81.60 


H. W. Wolfram, laying pipe 




and setting hydrants, 


174.18 


W. R. Cutter, drawing pipe, 


6.05 



40 



North Eastern Forestry Co., 




pine transplants, 


42.00 


Northampton Water Works, 




tapping main, 


42.25 


Norwood Engineering Co., hyd- 




rants, gates and boxes, 


231.35 


B. & M. E. R. Co., freight 


45.97 


B. & M. E. E. Co., repairs on 




main pipe, 


28.33 


E. W. Strong, collection water 




rates, 


159.28 


E. W. Strong, labor and cash 




paid, 


151.58 


Chas. W. Wade, labor, 


10.00 


Gazette Printing Co., Stamped 




envelopes, 


5.20 


F. M. Crittenden, printing bills, 


8.50 


H. S. Gere & Sons, advertising 




for bids, 


2.00 


W. H. Eiiey & Co., connections 




and supplies, 


32.70 


S. W. Kingsley, labor, 


8.25 



$4,325.07 



Balance, Cash on hand, 

Certificates of deposit 

First Nat. bank, $2,400.00 
Cash on deposit, First 

Nat. bank, 298.58 2,698.58 $7,023.65 



41 

The total cost of the Water Works to January 1, 
1917, is $64,143.12. T his past year we have laid four 
inch pipe on part of School street and set several new 
hydrants at a cost of $837.50. We have also trans- 
planted 7,000 white pine transplants on some of the 
land adjoining our water source. 

Nearly every dwelling, shops and all public build- 
ings are now connected to the system. 

CHAS. W. WADE, 

M. J. PEOULX, 

J. W. KILEY, 

Hatfield Water Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the books and ac- 
counts of the Treasurer of the Water Commissioners 
of the Town of Hatfield and find them correct, with 
vouchers on file for all payments made. 

CHAELES E. WAENER, Auditor. 
January 2, 1917. 



Report of Library Trustees 



Dr. Chester M. Barton who has served the town 
so long and faithfully as practicing physician, school 
superintendent and librarian has left Hatfield to make 
his .home in West Springfield and Miss Ellen A. Waite 
has been elected to the position of librarian to fill the 
vacancy left by the departure of Dr. Barton. At the 
time Dr. Barton's residence was destroyed by fire 
several books were burned, as was also the list of 
books purchased during the year up to that time and 
for that reason it will not be possible to give a list of 
the books added earlier in the year. The following 
books have been added to the library during the 
month of December: — Enoch Crane, When a Man's a 
Man, Heart of Eachel, Wall Street Girl, Bainbow's 
End, Mary Gusta,, Bird House Man, The Leopard 
Woman, Short Cut, Magnificent Adventure, Easing 
Tide, Christmas Surprise Party, Sara Crewe, Behind 
Glass Windows, Brownie Primer, Good-Naughty 
Books, Pinochio, Four Footed Folks, Little Eed Hen, 
Margery's Play Days, Father Brown's Indian Tales, 
Christmas Holidays at Mayvale, Dolly and Molly at 
the Circus, Mother West W^ind How Stories, Mother 
West Wind Why Stories, Mr. Britling Sees it 



43 

Through, Eichard Eichard, Girl at Big Loon Post, 
Tom Swift in the Caves of Ice, The Outdoor Chums at 
Cabin Point, The Tale of Brownie Beaver, The Tale 
of Paddy Muskrat, The Tale of Tommy Fox, The Tale 
of Peter Mink, Handbook of New England for 1916. 

IEVING A. FLINT, . 

Term Expires 1917. 

MES. MAEGAEET A. MULLANY, 

Term Expires 1918. 

MISS MAEGAEET EYAN, 
Term Expires 1919 

Trustees. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for 
the year 1916 are as follows: 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 





No. 


Males 


Females 


January 


9 


6 


3 


February 


5 


5 





March 


12 


6 


6 


April 


15 


9 


6 


May 


15 


10 


5 


June 


9 


5 


4 


July 


12 


6 


6 


August 


9 


6 


3 


September 


8 


4 


4 


October 


9 


3 


6 


November 


11 


3 


8 


December 


8 


5 


3 



122 



68 



54 



45 
BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 





Father 


Mother 


Born in United States 


26 


27 


Poland 


82 


78 


Ireland 





1 


Austro-Hungary 


14 


14 


Germany 





2 



122 122 

BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



1911 1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


69 74 


81 


93 


92 


MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 










No. 


January 

February 

March 






4 
4 



April 

May 

June 







9 
3 


July 
August 
September 
October 






2 

3 
1 


November 






3 


December 










29 



46 

First marriage of boht parties, 27 
Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 1 
Second marriage of bride, first of groom, 1 
The oldest and youngest groom were 33 and 20 

years of age respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 29 and 18 

years of age, respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 





Groom 


Bride 


Born in United States 


7 


9 


Poland 


20 


18 


Austria 


2 


2 



29 29 

MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



.911 


1912 


1913 


.1914 


1915 


22 


32 


26 


33 


38 



DEATHS BY MONTHS 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 



No. 


Males 


Females 


8 


5 - 


3 


1 


1 





3 


2 


1 


4 


4 





1 


1 





1 


1 





8 


5 


3 


2 


1 


1 



47 



September 
October 
November 
December 



Under 1 year of age, 
Between 1 and 10 years, 
Between 10 and 20 years, 
Between 20 and 30 years, 
Between 30 and 40 years, 
Between 40 and 50 years, 
Between 50 and 60 years, 
Between 60 and 70 years, 
Between 70 and 80 years, 
Between 80 and 90 years, 
Between 90 and 100 years, 



1 







1 


3 




1 


2 


2 




1 


1 


5 




3 


2 


19 




25 


14 




No. 


Males 


Females 




12 


10 


2 




6 


6 







2 


1 


1 




3 


1 


2 




2 





2 




1 


1 







4 


3 


1 




4 


1 


3 




2 





2 




1 


1 







2 


1 


1 



39 25 14 



Age of oldest person deceased, (female) 92 years, 
1 month, 18 days. 

NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 

Joseph Kostek Eugene L. Charlebois 

Mary Pasyk Theodore Gudfinski 

Joseph Smith William Norton 

Fidelia A. Biardwell Francis Jablowski 

Lucy H. Slattery Annie Dragena 

Peter Zagrodneck Raymond G. Hines 



48 



Charles Ozipowicz 
George M. Donelson 
Catherine J. Proulx 
Eoman Ozipowicz 
Frank Newman 
Thomas Bucela 
Edwin Krol 
Frank E. Lovett 
Nellie Pietrnszka 
John F. Hayes 
Nellie Hayes 
Paul Brucko 
Mary A. Sheehan 
George P. Graves 



John J. Ryan 
Mary Newman 
Ruth A. Allaire 
Phoebe H. Dickinson 
Louis D. Raboin 
Frances A. Stowell 
Peter Boyle 
Mary E. Kingsley 
Helen Yaroncek 
Sarah E. Morton 
Lemuel S. Bliss 
Mary L. Billings 
John A. Warner 



DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year end- 
ing November 30, 1916, with the receipts and settle- 
ments of the account with the Treasurer, is as follows: 
50 Male dogs at $2 each, $100.00 

2 Female dogs at $5 each, 10.00 



Less fees, 52 dogs at 20 cents each, 

Paid County Treasurer, 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 
Town Clerk, 



$110.00 
10.40 

$99.60 



Assessor's Report 



Section 22. Any taxpayer who in the year nine- 
teen hundred and seventeen fails to bring in a list of 
taxable personal estate, as provided in sections forty- 
one to forty-nine, inclusive, of Part I of chapter four 
hundred and ninety of the acts of the year nineteen 
hundred and nine, and acts in amendment thereof and 
in addition thereto, shall be assessed in that year for 
an amount of personal estate not less than that for 
which he was assessed and taxed in the year nineteen 
hundred and sixteen. The tax commissioner shall 
have authority to assess any taxpayer in any city or 
town for any amount of tax for which said taxpayer 
may be liable under the provisions of this section ; and 
any assessor who shall violate the provisions of this 
section shall be liable to the penalties imposed by sec- 
tion thirty-nine of Part I of chapter four hundred and 
ninety of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
nine, and acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto. 

The attention of all tax payers is called to the 
above Sec. 22. Acts of 1916, which if not complied with 
will surely increase his burdens, and thus make him 
the more willing to "kick" the assessors. 



50 



Value of assessed personal estate, $ 420,022 
Value of assessed real estate, 1,691,732 



Total value of assessed estate, 


$2,111,754 


Value of assessed buildings, 


$882,369 




Value of assessed land, 


809,363 








$1,691,732 


Number of polls assessed, 




684 


Residents assessed on property, 




434 


Non-residents assessed on property, 


81 


For poll tax only, 




372 


Rate of tax per $1,000, 




$2200 


Number of horses assessed,, 




476 


Cows, 




249 


Neat cattle 




26 


Swine 







Fowls 




30 


Dwelling houses 




393 


Acres of land 




9,246 


State Tax, 


$ 3,600.00 




State Highway Tax, 


558.17 




County Tax, 


4,938.31 




Town Tax, 


38,244.00 




Overlayings, 


486.11 $47,826.59 



Estimated Bank and Corporation Tax, $1,000 00 

Excise Tax, 763 92 

Addition to Warrant, 37.25 



51 



Value of property exempt from taxation under 
Chapter 490, Acts of 1909. 

Literary Institutions, $77,394 

Church property, 31,650 



$109,044 



Respectfully Submitted, 
EDSON W. STRONG, 
P. W. MULLINS, 
L. H. KENGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE- 



School Committee 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



•OF THE- 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1916 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John F. O'Dea, Chairman Term expires 1917 

Adam J. Smith, Secretary Term expires 1919 

Oscar E. Belden Term expires 1918 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Clinton J. Richards 
77 Main St., Hatfield Telephone 36-2 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield 
schools). 

C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet, and West Hat- 
field schools). 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
S. W. Kingsley 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Term opens Jan. 2, 1917, closes Feb. 23, 1917 
Term opens Mar. 5, 1917, closes Apr. 27, 1917 
Term opens May 7, 1917, closes June 22, 1917 
Term opens Sept. 4, 1917, closes Dec. 21, 1917 
Term opens Jan. 2, 1918, closes Feb. 21, 1918 
Term opens Mar. 4, 1918, closes Apr. 18, 1918 
Term opens Apr. 29, 1918, closes June 14, 1918 



Report of School Committee 



The committee organized for the year with John 
F. O'Dea, as chairman and Adam J. Smith as secre- 
tary. The date of the regular meeting is as formerly 
the first Thursday of each month. 

At the opening of the fall term in Bradstreet it 
was found that the amount of work to be done was 
more than one teacher could do properly. Miss Nellie 
E. Salvas was engaged as assistant, and the playroom 
was fitted up temporarily as a recitation room. If the 
attendance keeps up for another year some more per- 
manent arrangements may have to be made in the 
equipment of the rooms. 

Modern sanitary toilets have been installed in 
the basement of the Bradstreet building. The septic 
tank, made on an improved plan, is taking care of the 
sewage satisfactorily. 

The school building most needing repairs at pres- 
ent is at West Hatfield. The heating, lighting,, venti- 
lating, and toilet arrangements are inconvenient and 
unsanitary. To remedy these conditions would prob- 
ably cost considerably more than the present building- 
is worth — and the building when repaired would be 



57 

far from satisfactory. Under these circumstances the 
committee suggests that a special committee be ap- 
pointed to advise with the school committee and make 
recommendations to the town at the. next annual meet- 
ing in regard to the West Hatfield building. 

The superintendent of schools has furnished the 
committee with the following report relating to the 
growth of the schools during the past five years in the 
district of which Hatfield is a part: 



No. Schools 


No. Teachers 


No. Pupils 


1911 1916 


1911 1916 


1911 m6 


Bernardston 5 7 


6 


8 


144 150 


Harney 11 16 


14 


21 


3/6 533 


Hatnneld 11 16 


11 


17 


315 468 


Total 27 89 


31 


46 


855 1151 


Gain in 5 years 12 


15 




316 


Hadiey cs Hatneld 








now iiave 31 


38 




1001 


This is more than , 








in the entire 








district in 1911 








by 5 


7 




166 



"Problems relating to supervision and adminis- 
tration, also office and clerical work, have increased in 
even larger ratio than the increase in numbers would 
indicate. 

There is more work in the three towns than can 
be properly done by one official, and some re-adjust- 
ment would appear to be necessary. Hadiey and Hat- 



58 

field together could profitably use the entire time of 
a superintendent. Bernardston is a very desirable 
town to serve, but it is about twenty-five miles from 
the rest of the district, and it would seem that it could 
be more economically served in a district with some 
nearer towns.' ' 

The Hatfield committee believe that some read- 
justment is for the best interest of all concerned and 
will probably favor such action at the meeting of the 
\oint committee next April. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending Dec. 31, 1916. 
Eesources 



From State: 








Superintendent of 


Schools 


$500.00 




School Fund 




5 77. 19 


$1,077.19 


Tuition: 






Whately 




155.17 




Northampton 




144.08 




Boston 




6.75 


306.00 


Dog tax refunded 




102.89 


Tickets sold 






38.48 


Sundries sold 






1.38 


Town: Regular appropriation 


11,500.00 




For repairs at Bradstreet 


500.00 


12,000.00 



Total resources $13,525.94 





59 




Expenditures 




Salaries: 






Teachers 




7,403.60 


Janitors 




1,436.00 


Supervisors 




383.00 


Superintendent of Schools 


720.00 


School committee 




65.00 10,007.60 


Books and supplies 


749.06 


Fuel 




1,342.98 


Eepairs 




992.43 


Transportation 




128.00 


Miscellaneous 


J 


313.72 


Total expenditures 


$13,533.79 


Overdrawn 




$7.85 


JOHN F. 


O'DEA 


, Chairman 



Report of the 

Superintendent of Schools 



In the calendar year covered by this report, com- 
prising portions of two school years, there have been 
no events of marked importance in school affairs. But 
while nothing sensational has been attempted yet 
there has been constant effort to keep in touch with 
current theory and practice, and a purpose to apply 
in our teaching and administration whatever has 
seemed best and most practicable. 

Only some of the outstanding features of the 
year's work are given here together with some sug- 
gestions for the future. 

CENSUS AND ENROLLMENT 

By a recent change in the law, the school census 
is no longer taken in September, but the record of all 
children in town is supposed to be kept continuously. 
The official number for the year as reported to the 
state will be based on the number listed on April 1. At 
the time of the last census in September, 1915, there 
were 498 children in town between the ages of five 
and fifteen. 



61 

The number of pupils enrolled in our schools on 
October 1, of each year has increased from 315 in 
1911, to 468 in 1916, an average gain of about 30 each 
year, or aoubt 49% for the five years. In about the 
same period the population of the town has increased 
from 1986 in 1910, to 2630 in 1915, a gain of about 
32%. The enrollment by schools and grades for Octo- 
ber 1916 may be found in the table accompanying this 
report. 

CHANGE IN SCHOOL CALENDAR 

By referring to the school calendar on another 
page it will be noticed that the school year now con- 
sists of thirty-eight weeks, divided into four terms, 
with one long term in the fall and three short terms in 
the winter and spring. Many towns in the state have 
found this plan to work to advantage, and we believe 
it will prove an improvement on the former arrange- 
ment. 

TEACHERS AND SALARIES 

Five teachers, Misses Woods, Jenney, Hibbard, 
O'Brien, and Biley, resigned before the opening" of the 
present year, and two others. Misses Band and Breor, 
were transferred to the third grade Pnd fifth grade re- 
spectively of the Central school. The increasing- num- 
ber of grades and pupils in the Bradstreet school has 
made it necessary to employ another teacher there- 
Miss Lyons resigned in December from the third 
grade in the Central building and Mrs. L. A. Powers 
is substituting in her place. The names and assign- 
ments of all teachers, may be found in the table on 
another page of this report. 



62 

Beginning with January an increase in salary of 
two dollars a week has been granted to all Hatfield 
teachers. Many other towns and cities are taking 
similar action. The recent increase in the cost of liv- 
ing and the tendency toward higher wages in other 
lines of work would alone be sufficient reason for this 
increase. But there are other reasons more import- 
ant than these which would justify paying teachers 
considerably larger weekly salaries than they have 
formerly received. One reason is their limited period 
of employment, this being only from two-thirds to 
three-quarters of the year. Another is the higher 
standard of living that a teacher is expected to main- 
tain, and the expense of attending summer schools, 
institutes and other meetings, together with the 
books, magazines, and other material tnat she must 
have in order to increase or even maintain her effi- 
ciency as a teacher. Then under the present pension 
law she must deposit with the state treasurer at least 
thirty-five dollars each year, which is not available 
for her use until she retires from teaching. 

The strongest reason of all for a more liberal sal- 
ary schedule lies not in the needs of the teacher but 
in the nature of the service to be rendered. The one 
vital element in the whole school system is the teach- 
er^ personality and work. "The teacher makes the 
school." All else — builrings, equipment, supervision 
— are secondary. Pine buildings, attractive books 
and pictures, playgrounds, expert supervision, and 
good janitor service are important, yet all avail but 
little when the teacher is weak and inefficient. 



63 

It is true as a general rale in all lines of work 
that the quality of service rendered is in proportion 
to the salary paid. In no other way can a town im- 
prove its schools more effectively than by increasing 
the salaries of its teachers ; for the larger salary 
makes available a higher type of service than could 
be secured for the smaller rate. 

An advance of only one dollar a week has some- 
times made the difference between success and par- 
tial or complete failure. The higher salary paid to 
an efficient teacher is a good investment, while if for 
the lower salary it is possible to employ only a weak 
or inefficient teacher, the money may be worse than 
wasted. Here, as elsewhere in the world of affairs, 
"the best is the cheapest.' ' 

SUPERVISORS 

Miss Boyle continues to supervise the work in mu- 
sic successfully. Miss Landers, the supervisor of 
drawing, was released early in the year to accept a 
more desirable position. It has not been possible to 
find a suitable person for the place, but it is expected 
that one will be secured to begin in February. 

Our schools made fine progress in penmanship 
last year under the supervision of Miss Kilmurry. 
She is now employed for full time by Northampton 
and we have as yet found no one for the position. 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

With the exception of arithmetic the text-books 
in use are satisfactory. Several series of arithmetics 
have been issued within the last few years that are su- 



64 

perior to the one now used in our schools. I would 
recommend that a change be made at the opening of 
the school year 1917-18 if the expense can be met out 
of the regular book and supply account. 

In common with other interests the schools are 
affected by the "high cost of living." Some grades 
of paper have trebled in cost, while the prices of some 
other articles are practically prohibitive. Beginning 
with January nearly all book publishers have also 
advanced the prices of text-books. To partly offset 
the higher cost more care and economy in the use of 
the standard supplies has been suggested to teachers 
and pupils. 

PROMOTIONS AND GRADING 

So far as conditions permit, grading is flexible by 
subjects. There is no "passing mark," or locksetp 
in promotions. A pupil should be assismed to the 
class or grade where his scholarship, ability, maturi- 
ty, and willingness to work indicate that he can get 
the greatest benefit. Promotions come regularly at 
the end of the school year, but a pupil may be ad- 
vanced at any time during the year when he gives 
evidence of ability to do the work in a higher grade. 

Commencing this year, the elementary school 
course is reduced from nine to eight grades. Wo : 
lieve the improved organization of the schools will 
warrant this change and that it will prove a saving 
both in time and expense. 

It is taken for granted that many pupils who en- 
ter the first grade at the age of five years, coming- 



65 

from homes where no English is heard, will need to 
repeat the first year's work. When he has once mast- 
ered the work of the first grade, a pupil of average 
ability should be able to complete the elementary 
course in seven years. 

BOYS' AND GIRLS' GARDEN CLUBS 

About one hundred seventy Hatfield boys and 
girls undertook garden work in some form for the 
season of 1916. A majority carried the work through 
the season more or less successfully. During the fall 
term a fine exhibit was given at the Central school. 
This was called by visiting experts one of the best 
town exhibits in the state. A selection of the best 
articles from this exhibit was taken to the three- 
county fair at Northampton where it received the 
second prize, a silver cup. Several individual prizes 
were also taken by Hatfield pupils at both the North- 
ampton Fair and the National Dairy Show at Spring- 
field. This should be considered a very good show- 
ing, since it is the first time that the Hatfield schools 
have exhibited at the fairs. 

All pupils having gardens were enrolled as mem- 
bers of the Boys' and Girls' Garden Club, by the Ex- 
tension Department of the Massachusetts Agricultur- 
al College. The Hampshire County Farm Bureau also 
co-operated by furnishing an agent, Mr. Wetherbee, 
to direct and supervise the work. The success of the 
movement was largely due to the interest shown by 
teachers and citizens, several of whom assisted in in- 
specting the gardens during the summer. 



66 

There is no question as to either the educational 
or economic value of the work. It takes nothing 
from the regular school subjects but rather adds to 
their significance and practical value. It enlists the 
interest of teacher, pupil, and parent, and thus helps 
to bring about a better understanding and co-opera- 
tion between the home and the school. It helps the 
child to "find himself" and frequently develops a lik- 
ing for and an appreciation of farm life and pursuits. 

There has been in the past too great a tendency 
to educate our children away from the farm and to- 
wards the store or office. They should be led to feel 
that labor either with head or with hands is equally 
worthy and honorable, and that the spirit of the work- 
er and the quality of the work done are the really 
important considerations. The inclusion of garden- 
ing, manual training, and domestic science among the 
school activities will help to give children the right 
attitude towards honest and necessary manual labor. 

Plans are being made for the continuation and 
extension of the garden work during the present 
year. 

EVENING SCHOOL 

Owing to the small number of illiterate minors 
registered in town and the lack of interest shown by 
those who are above the age of legal requirement, no 
session of evening school has been held this season. 

It is highly desirable that all persons of foreign 
birth who are to become permanent residents of our 
town acquire at least the rudiments of an education 



67 

in the English language. If any assruance of a profit- 
able attendance could be given. I would recommend 
that the town provide for the instruction of all who 
might wish to attend. 

HEALTH 

Health should be one of the fundamental consid- 
erations in any school system. Without good health, 
the best educational opportunities can be of little val- 
ue to the individual or the community. Progress, effi- 
ciency, and happiness largely depend on having a 
" sound mind in a sound body." It should be one of 
primary functions of the school to see that pupils have 
proper instruction and training in hygiene. But the 
teaching of hygiene will not suffice unless the condi- 
tions in and around the schoolhouse conform to sani- 
tary requirements. 

The Committee on Health Education of the Na- 
tional Education Association have given the mini- 
mum requirements for rural schools in the form of 
the "Sanitary Ten Commandments ' ' as follows: 

In every school which may be considered pass- 
ably sanitary the following conditions shall obtain: 

1. Heating by at least a properly jacketed stove. 
(No unjacketed stove to be allowed) Avoid overheat- 
ing. Temperature should never go above 68 degrees 
F. 

Ventilating by direct outdoor air inlets and by 

adequate and direct foul air outlets. 

2. Lighting from left side of room (or from left 
and rear) through window space at least one-fifth of 
floor space in area. 



68 

3. Cleanliness of school as good as in the home 
of a careful housekeeper. 

4. Furniture sanitary in kind, and easily and 
frequently cleaned. Seats and desks adjustable and 
hygienic in type. 

5. Drinking water from a pure source provided 
by a sanitary drinking fountain. 

6. Facilities for washing hands, and individual 
towels. 

7. Toilets sanitary in type and in care (with no 
cesspools unless water tight) and no neglected privy 
boxes or vaults. 

8. Flies and mosquitoes excluded by thorough 
screening of schoolhouse and toilets. 

9. Obscene and defacing marks absolutely ab- 
sent from schoolhouse and toilets. 

10. Playground of adequate size for every rural 
school. ' ' 

To these I would add the following: 

11. Thorough training in hygiene aiming to- 
ward the formation of good " health habits." 

12. Regular (at least once a year) medical and 
dental inspection with some provision for remedy- 
ing defects found. 

We owe it to our children that as far as possible, 
these conditions should be met in all our schools. 

CONCLUSION 

The people of Hatfield are loyal to their schools. 
They have given evidence of this by their generous 
financial and moral support. In return what should 
they expect the schools to do for their children! 



69 

First and always they must furnish the essentials 
of an English education, the "3 R's" with a modern 
interpretation. Together with instruction in the es- 
sentials there should be given some knowledge and 
appreciation of music, nature, art, and literature 
Through different forms of practical arts a taste for 
home interests and duties should be fostered, and re- 
spect for any form of honest labor. Above all, both 
by precept and example, and through the various ac- 
tivities of the school, there should be imparted the 
fundamental principles of morality and good conduct. 
This is our ideal. To realize it we shall need the co- 
operation of all the social and individual forces of the 
community. 

CLINTON J. RICHARDS. 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



The work in musical theory which is being taught 
in our public schools may be denned under two heads, 
namely, time and tune. Under time comes the seven 
time motions and their modifications; which cover the 
rhythmical value of all the notes; arithmetic of mu- 
sic; and the theory of common and compound time. 
Under the time side is; memorizing the scale as a rote 
song and drill in singing accurately any of its inter- 
vals; staff reading; pitch names; finding "do" from 
key signatures; key names; chromatics; position of 
sharps and flats in signature and scale structure. 

A thorough knowledge of these fundamentals 
combined with good tone quality, which must be in- 
sisted upon in all singing, insures accurate sight sing- 
ing and the musical interpretation of any song within 
the grade of the individual. 

The chorus work for the first three years consists 
of rote songs which appeal to the children. In the 
fourth and fifth grades two part singing is started and 
according to the ability of the grades increased to 
three and four parts. 

I take this opportunity to express my sincere 
gratitude to our teachers for their faithful work and 
earnest endeavor to make this one of our most suc- 
cessful years in the course of music. 
MAUDE E. BOXXE. 



Report of Medical Inspectors 



When the schools opened September, 1916, Mass- 
achusetts was in the height of an epidemic of Infan- 
tile Paralysis. The question naturally arose as to 
the advisability of opening the schools. 

The State Board of Education advised, if pror>er 
medical supervision was provided, that it would be 
well to open on time. 

Your Medical Inspectors visited daily, till dang- 
er of the epidemic was past. No case of Infantile 
Paralysis developed among the children of school 
age, and the schools have not been interrupted by 
any serious illness. 

At this time we wish to further enmhasize the 
necessity for proper care of children's teeth. The 
small cavities found in the first set mav be filled 
without pain to ^9 child and wi+hout much expense, 
if done earlv. Wo find in our msTvpctions that at a 
certain ace. the maiori f v of the children show preat 
neglect of the teeth. Thev arp unable to masticate 
their food nroperlv. because their teeth are in ulcer- 
ated condition. This is not onlv im'nrious to their 
health for the time-being, but often leads to organic 
disease from which they suffer later. Manv times, 
for relief, they are driven to extraction, which inter- 
feres with the proper development of the mouth and 
of the second set. 

CHAELES A. BYENE, M. D. 

A. J. BONNEVILLE, M. D. 

Medical Inspectors. 



72 





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Hill Primary 

West Grammar 
West Primary 
North Grammar 
North Primary 

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Supr. of Music 


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Margaret L. Claire 
Sarah V. Kiely 
Constance C. Breor 
Margaret A. Ryan 
Blanche E. Lyons 
Doris J. Rand 
Mary G. Dickinson 
Mary C. Leary 
Lena H. Proulx 
Georgia Gates 
Alice E. Keating 
Katharyn T. Lucey 
Mary D. Donelson 
Mary B. Woods 
Nellie E. Salvas 
Maude E. Boyle 


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Total 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OP THE 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1917 



HERALD JOB PRINT 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Finance Committee 



To the Voters of the Town of Hatfield : — 

(xentlemen :— -Owing to the uncertainties-— to en- 
able our boys at the front to go '"over the top" more 
easily, it should be the wise and patriotic duty of all 
voters to adopt "retrenchment" as their slogan for 
this year. 

Provided that the State and County taxes are no 
larger than last year, and that these appropriations are 
not exceeded, we can promise a rate of nineeteen dol- 
lars. 

We recommend the following appropriations only : 
Obligations already voted on and to be assessed in 

1918:— 
Street Lights, $3,548.00 

Fifth payment and interest— New School- 
house Loan, 3,395.00 



Article 5— Highways. 



$6,943.00 



Ordinary Repairs — highways and 

bridges, 2,500.00 

Repairs and resurfacing stone roads, 2,000.00 

Oiling stone roads, 3,000.00 



Article 6 — Necessary town expenses. 

Contingencies, $1,200.00 

Bonds—Town Officers, 100.00 

Care Memorial Hall, 150.00 

Salaries— Town Officers, 1,600.00 

Poor— care of, 1,000.00 

Interest, 950.00 

Insurance, 75.00 

Inspection of Animals, 75,00 

Hatfield— Hadley Ferry, 100.00 

Sen ools — ma intenance, 14,000.00 

$19,250.00 

Article 7 — Memorial Day, $ 75,00 

Article 10— Care of Cemeteries, 100.00 

Article 11— Public Library, 500.00 

Article 14— School Physicians, 100.00 

Article 15— Smith Industrial School, 250.00 

Article 17— Tree Warden and Moth Work, 50.00 

Article 18— Tuition— Smith Academy, 1,000.00 
Article 19 — Hampshire County Farm Bureau, 100.00 



$35,868.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. B.YAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
GEORGE S. BELDEN, 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Warrant for Town 
Meeting, February 4, 1918 



Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2— To choose all necessary town officers 
for the ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; 
one Assessor for three years; Town Treasurer; one 
School Committee for 3 years; one Water Commis- 
sioner for 3 years; one Sinking Fund Commissioner 
for 3 years; one Trustee Public Library for 3 years; 
Auditor; Tree Warden; Elector, under the Will of 
Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; six Constables; and to 
vote on the question — "Yes" or "No" — Shall Li- 
censes be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in this town? All the foregoing to be voted for on one 
ballot. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, and be kept open at least four hours, and for 
as much longer time as a majority of the voters pres- 
ent shall direct, but in no case shall they be kept open 
after the hour of sunset. 

Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various 
town officers and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 



Article 5 — To take action in relation to main- 
tenance and repairs of highways and bridges the en- 
suing year, and raise and appropriate money for the 
same. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising 
money and appropriating same to defray the neces- 
sary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8 — To take action in relation to support 
of the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

Article 9 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for care of cemeteries for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the Public Library for the ensu- 
ing year, and what action the town will take to pro- 
vide better accommodations for the same. 

Article 12 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 13~Fo see if the town will vote to au- 
thorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Se- 
lectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the rev- 
enue of the current financial year. 



Article 14 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for the employment of one or 
more School Physicians, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hat- 
field children attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 16- — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for any supplies for the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for Tree Warden and Brown 
Tail Moth work. 

Article 18— -To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions and sup- 
plying books for Hatfield pupils in Smith Academy, 
who are of suitable age and attainments to attend 
High School, 

Article 19 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for aiding the Hampshire 
County Farm Bureau. 

Article 20— To hear the report of the Committee 
appointed at the last annual meeting for the purpose 
of investigating, and finding ways and means for im 
proving the conditions of the West Hatfield school 
building. 

Article 21 — To see if the town will vote to cele- 
brate its 250th Anniversary, (due 1920) and authorize 
and appoint a Committee for the purpose of preparing 



8 

a programme that will represent the public spirit in 
this modern -old town. 

Article 22 — To hear the special report on Motor- 
izing the town's Fire Department. 

Article 23 — To see what action — if any— the 
town will take in regard to preventing the contamina- 
tion of the purity of its water supply at the source, and 
also to consider the advisability of enlarging the ca- 
pacity of the reservoir. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield:— 

In accordance with the requirements of the 
Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for 
the year ending December 31st, 1917, is respectfully 
submitted : 

STATE AID. 

State Aid paid to three persons, $162.00 

TREE WARDEN 
F. A. Pease, old bill, $2.00 

MEMORIAL DAY 
U.K. Morton, $73.20 

POOR EXPENDITURES. 



C.-A. Byrne, 


30.00 


G. H. Danforth— Clothing, 


2.20 


H. W. Marsh— Clothing, 


4,00 


J. H. Moore— Clothing, 


9.14 


Dickinson Hospital, 


222.00 


P. Aheaxn & Co.— Burial, 


40.00 


City of Northampton, 


304.50 


E, B. Richardson — Med. Attendance, 


2.25 


H. E. Roote — Supplies, 


8.65 


Hampshire County Sanatorium, 


173.58 



$796.32 



10 
CONTINGENCIES. 

I\ R. Mullany, stamped envelopes and postage, $28.24 

Geo. Eberlein, table for Town Hall, 13.60 

Henry Pellam, care Town Hall and clock, 121.50 

M. J. Proulx, police duty, 49.70 

Herald Job Print, town reports and ptg., 230.25 

Amherst Gas Co., Town Hall, 19.49 

C. A. Byrne, fumigating, 74.50 

Est. A. L. Strong, wood Town Hall, 45.00 

William F. Fitzgibbons, plumbing, 3.90 

Fred Kleasner, sawing wood Town Hall, 5.50 

Wm. P. Bovle, rep. Town Hall, 16.35 

C. H. Chase, transfer, 7.95 

Library Bureau, 1.00 

A. S. B. Lothrop Co., cleanser, 6.00 

Wright & Potter Ptg. Co., assessors' list, 8.67 

W. and L. E. Gurley, sealers' supplies, 5.42 

I). E. F. Radasch, sweeping compound, 10.00 

Peerless Handcuff Co., 7.00 

Geo, Roderick, police duty, 2.50 

Kietan Backiel, police duty, 4.50 

II. S. Gere & Sons, adv., 10.26 

Ilobbs & Warren, books, 4.40 

Sexton Can Co., sealers' supplies, 8.00 

•F. G. Vollinger, sawing wood, 3.75 

E. L. Graves, 5.50 
Johnson's Bookstore, coll. book, 1.80 

F. L. Woodruff, rep., 6.78 
F. E. Davis, watches, 103.50 
C. T. Bagnall, tax bills, 2.70 
James L. Day, music, 10.00 
A. J. Bonneville, retng. births and fumigating, 57.25 
Jos. Goclowski, police duty, 33.00 
PVed Wenzel, police duty, 3.00 
F; G. Howard, sup. Town Hall, 7.05 



IX 

A. R. Breor, constable, 3.00 

S. W. Kingsley, moth work, 37.50 

L. H. Kingsley, serving selectmen's warrant, 25.00 
L. H. Kingsley, recording births, marriages 

and deaths, 72.50 

L. H. Kingsley, stamps, fares, etc., 19.42 



$1,075.48 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Charles W. Wade, services selectman 1916, $150.00 

James L. Bay, services selectman 1916, 75.00 

H. W. Marsh, services selectman 1916, 75.00 

John McHugh, services as elector, 10.00 

C. I. Stowell, ballot clerk, 6.00 

Robert J. McGrath, ballot clerk, 3.00 

Joseph E. Godin, ballot clerk, 15.00 

John J. Fortsch, ballot clerk, 3.00 

E. L. Graves, ballot clerk, 3.00 

Dennis E. Holley, ballot clerk, 2.00 

H. L. Pellam, ballot clerk, 9.00 

P. W. Mullins, services as assessor, 37.50 

E. W. Strong, services as assessor, 45.00 

L. H. Kingsley, services as assessor, 227.50 

L. H. Kingsley, registrar of voters, 15.00 

Thomas W. Ryan, registrar of voters, 15.00 

R. W. Weober, registrars of voters, 15.00 

Samuel F. Billings, registrar of voters, 15.00 
E. L. Graves, salary as sealer of weights and 

measures, 100.00 
E. L. Graves, balance of salary as collector, 

1915, 50.00 

EJ. h . Graves, part of salary as collector, 1916, 175.00 



12 

Li. H. Kingsley, town clerk and elefk board 

selectmen, 500.00 

L. H. Kingsley, town treasurer, 125.00 



$1,671.00 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 

Clinton J. Richards, services as Supt,, $752.62 

Maxy L. Allaire, services as principal, 795.70 

Theresa Nolan, teaching, 474.00 

Mary C. Leary, teaching, 497.00 

Margaret L. Claire, teaching, 433.40 

Mary B. Woods, teaching, 497.58 

Alice E. Keating, teaching, 279.00 

Kathryn T. Lucy, teaching, 256.00 

Doris J. Rand, teaching, 288.00 

Mary G. Dickinson, teaching, 176.00 

Rose P. Dewey, teaching, 98.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, teaching, 532.00 

Constance C. Breor, teaching, 322.00 

Georgia Gates, teaching, 345.00 

Mary D. Donelson, teaching, 322.00 

Nellie E. Salvas, teaching, 456.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, teaching, 112.00 

Harriet P. Thomas, teaching, 331.80 

Lena H. Proulx, teaching, 529.20 

Mary B. Powers, teaching, 532.00 

Mrs. T. Graves, teaching, 16.80 

Grace W. Bardwell, teaching, 2.80 

Mrs. H. R. Belden, teaching, 47.60 

Regina M. Fortsch, teaching, 165.00 

Laura F. Jubenville, teaching, 165.00 

Helen C. Harrington, teaching, 165.00 

Margaret M. Healy, teaching, 165.00 

Hazel Powers, teaching, 165.00 



IS 

Irene I. Devine, teaching, 165.00 

John F. Horgan, teaching, 225.75 

Sarah Harris, teaching, 2.80 

Marion (Billings, teaching, 5.60 

Amelia F. Goold, teaching, 12.00 

Beda Bjurman, drawing, 185,00 

Maude E. Boyle, music, 238.00 

Anna L. Kilmurry, waiting, 26.90 

Teachers' Retirement Board, pensions, 466.30 

Mary A. Walker, teaching, 25.00 
John F. O'Dea, janitor, ■ '■'." .'".'..".' 894,70 

Edward V. Slattery, janitor, 193,00 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor, 123.25 

Katherine Flynn, janitor, 131.00 

John Salvas, janitor, 147,75 

H. D. Smith, coal, 736.28 

H. W. Wolfram, coal, 293.79 

John J. Betsold, wood, 21.00 

Bernice N. Cutter, census, 18.00 

Est, of A. L. Strong, wood, 18.00 

John Borowski, labor, 2.50 

F. G. Howard, supplies, 6.93 

Foster-Farrar Co., supplies, 14.30 

Boston Paper Bd. Co., supplies, 12.00 

H. A. Wales Co., flag, 5.00 

Daniel O 'Neil, flags, 19.50 

Atkinson, Metzger & Co., hooks, 6.26 

Boston Index Card Co., 18.13 

Bowling School Supply Co., 18.00 

Charles Scribner's Sons, books, 2.00 

Edw. E. Babb & Co., supplies, 61.34 

F. A. Owen Pub. Co., books, 3.50 

Ginn & Co., books, 358.31 

The Macmillan Co., books, 11.88 

The A. S. Barnes Co., books, 7.82 

D. C. Heath & Co., books, 15.05 



14 

The A. N. Palmer Co., bks., 1.35 

Clarence Hawks, bks., 3.20 

Silver Burdett & Co., books, 10.47 

Houghton Miffin Co,, bks., 75.34 

Rand McNally Co., bks., 4.85 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies, 373.74 

American Pad and Paper Co., 39.66 

Scott Forseman & Co., bks=, 1.93 

Lyons & Carrahan, bks., 5.07 

J. E. Lambie & Co., ribbon, 3.27 

Easthampton News Co., 10.22 

F. M. Crittenden, ptg., 13.15 

Wright & Potter Ptg. Co., .80 

A. F. Lovering, B. Inspect,, 2.00 

P. F. O'Leary, sign, 1.00 

Harvey Oil Co., floor oil, 12.14 

H. A. Swameld, flag pole fixtures, 7.17 

John M. Strong, trans,, 5.00 

John Vochula, trans., 3.25 

W. H. Riley & Co., furnace, supplies, rep., 180.71 

F. W. Schepp, rep., 36.50 

0. E. Belden, rep., 110.00 

Merrick Lumber Co., 5.89 

F. G. Vollinger, saw wood, 3.75 

O. E. Belden & Sons, care of grounds, 12.00 

O. E. Belden, com., 20.00 

A. J. Smith, com., 20.00 

Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., tickets, 90.00 

P. R. Mullany, tickets, 4.80 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., 31.00 

Amherst Gas Co., 23.65 

S. W. Kingsley, rep. and truants, 20.00 

Wm. F. Fitzgibbons, x)lumbing, 5.25 

AVm. P. Boyle, rep., 95.98 

$14,646.33 



15 
CARE OF CEMETERIES 

F. H. Bardwell, treas., $100.00 

OILING ROADS 
The Barrett Co., $2,025.10 

SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 
A. J. Bonneville, $50.00 

TUITION SMITH ACADEMY '• ' 
V. H, Keller, treas,, $1,000.00 

OLD BILLS, 

Foster-Farrar Co., chain, $98.63 

The Barrett Co., oil tarvia,' 23.50 

P. J. Whalen, tree warden, 73.89 



$196.02 

Hampshire County Farm Bureau, $100.00 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Ellen A. Waite, bulbs and salary, 232.16 

I. A. Flint, ex. and cash bks., 2.00 
Carrie C. Cutter, care of Dist. and Magazines, 31.50 

Mrs. Geo. Fusck, cleaning', 2.00 

Fred G. Howard, supplies, 2.24 

Library Bureau, 2.83 

Porter E. Sargent, books, 1.80 

Bridgman & Lyman, books, 30.17 

EL R. Huntting Co., books, 49.66 

J.' W. Hefrernan, books, ' $ "• - 36.24 



16 

Johnson's Bookstore, books, 4.16 

A. R. Womrath, books, 4.10 



$398.80 

STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Company, $3,551.18 

BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 

H. L. Howard, bond for Treasurer, 40.00 

H. L. Howard, bond for Tax Collector, 50.00 

H. L. Howard, bond for Treas. W. Com., 8,00 



$98,00 

INSURANCE 

H. L. Howard, ins. building?, $158.02 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND CARCASSES 

E. S. Warner, $298.50 

Fred T. BardwelL 113.60 



$412.10 

ORDINARY REPAIRS— HIGHWAYS AND 
BRIDGES 

D. P. Sheehan, services Supt, team and labor, $939.67 

Alex Donis, team and labor, 91.50 

H. D. Smith, team and labor, 45.60 

P. W. Mullins, team and labor, 24.40 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 51.00 

W. H. Dickinson, team and labor, 33.00 

Belden Bros., team and labor, 25.00 



17 

James Mullins, team and labor, 12.00 

Alfred B. Proulx, team and labor, 24.00 

Geo. B. MeClellan, team and labor, 11.30 

E. A. Ryan, team and labor, 9.00 
John F. O'Dea, team and labor, 6.00 
ML W. Boyle, team and labor, 31.00 
Win. R. Cutter, team and labor, 39.75 
John T. Powers, team and labor, 18.00 
Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 240.00 
John L. Boyle, team and labor, 8.10 
John C. Ryan, team and labor, 97.00 
John Kosti, labor, 78.37 
Roman Rogaleski, labor, 2.50 
John Kozash, labor, 5.00 
Alex Waljsick, labor, 5.00 
John M. Strong, labor, 1.50 
H. Stoddard, labor, 152.34 
P. A. McGlynn, labor, 12.50 
Earl W. Smith, labor, 9.00 
James R, Coffey, labor, 4.00 
John Fusek, labor, 26.50 
John Osley, Sr., labor, 11.25 

F. G. Vollinger, labor, 2.00 
Steve Polock, labor, 15,00 
John Osley, 2nd, labor, 15.00 
Alex Kozash, labor, 36.00 
John L. Sheehan, labor, 185.25 
Jacob Geis, labor, 151.88 
Geo. Franklin, labor, 26.38 
John Petcen, labor, 53,10 
Kietan Backiel, care of common, 40.00 
John L. Sullivan, cement mixer, 8.75 
Wm. F. Fitzgibbons blumbing, 4.65 
B. & M. R, R., freight on oil, ^ 3.00 
Chase & Coolidge Co., oil, 17.30 
Fred G. Howard, supplies, 17.59 



18 



E. W. Strong, gravel, 
Peter Mastalicz, boots, 
Geo. Eberlein, repairs, 
Foster-Farrar Co., supplies, 
J. C. Burrington, plank, 

M. H. Dwight, plank, 

F, A, Bartlett, timber and plank, 
Est. of A. L. Strong, post, 
Shumway & Rilev, tile, 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile, 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co.. repairs, 

North 'n Iron Works, catch basin, 

W. J. Szczepnek, brick, 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting bridge, 

E. E. Davis, advise, bridge, 

Joseph G-owash, labor, 

Frank Gowash, labor, 



30.00 

13.50 

7.75 

34.39 

52.50 

7.96 

282,87 

80,00 

133.22 

137,09 

4,15 

9.00 

7.80 

95.75 

34.00 

7.50 

7.50 



$3,525.16 



SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 
Tuition, 

HATFIELD-HADLEY FERRY 
John J. Breor, 

CENTRE SCHOOL TABLET 
The Mitchell Co., 

REPAIRS— STONE ROADS 

D. P. Sheehan, services as Supt., team and 

labor, 
H. D. Smith, coal, tile, team and labor, 
John C. Ryan, team and labor. 



$473.71 



100.00 



168.00 



$548.55 

224.65 

30.00 



19 



Wm. R. Cutter, team and labor, 


99.00 


Alex Donis, team and labor, 


39.00 


Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 


219.00 


Alex Kozash, team and labor, 


109.70 


M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 


36.00 


James Mullins, team and labor. 


82.50 


E. A. Ryan, team and labor, 


24.00 


Alfred E. Breor, team and labor, 


39.00 


J. T. Powers, team and labor, 


24,00 


Geo, M. Franklin, labor, 


57.38 


John L, Sheehan, labor, 


165.75 


Jacob G-eis, labor, 


96.51 


John Peteen, labor, 


66.25 


Steve Polock, labor, 


9.38 


P. A. McGlynn, labor, 


12.50 


John Osley, 2nd, labor, 


10,00 


Roman Rogaleski, labor, 


12.50 


John Fusek, labor, 


4.13 


John Murphy, labor, 


9.00 


Alex Walpick, labor, 


10.00 


John S. Korupski, labor, 


2,25 


Frank Maleski, labor, 


12.50 


H. Stoddard, labor, 


173.33 


John Fishman, labor, 


6.25 


The Barret Co., oil, 


124,34 


J. S. Lane & Sons, stone, 


530.85 



$2,778.32 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Maynard Rubber Corp., hose and supplies, $528.89 
Orcutt Wagon Works, 7.38 

Fred Wenzzel, wagon and drying hose, and tires, 10.00 
John J. Bet sold, H. Wagon/ 5.00 

Thos. M. O'Dea, H. Wagon, 5.00 



20 



H. W. Marsh, H. Wagon, 5.00 

C. H. Crafts, H. Wagon, 5.00 

Mrs. Jas. Mullins, H. Wagon, 5.00 



$571.27 



CARE OF MEMORIAL HALL 

H. D. Smith, coal, $71.33 

L. H, Kingsley, janitor, 75.00 



$146,33 



COW BRIDGE ROAD 

D, P. Sheehan, services as Supt., team and labor, $78.00 

J. T. Powers, team and labor, 34.25 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 42.00 

Alfred Breor, team and labor, 6.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 9.00 

Alex Kozash, team and labor, 24.00 

Roman Rogaleski, labor, 17.50 

John Petcin, labor, 17.50 

Jacob Geis, labor, 17.50 

Steve Polock, labor, 7.50 

Alex Walpick, labor, 5.00 

II. Stoddard, labor, 16.65 

John L. Sheehan, labor, 22.75 

L. H. Kingsley, sand, 13.85 

Lewis Mnrry, loam, 8.00 



$319.50 



WASHOUTS 

D. P. Sheehan, services as Supt., team and 

labor, $314.50 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 126.37 



21 

F. A. Pease, team and labor, 21.00 

Alex Donis, team and labor, 69.00 

C. H. Crafts, team and labor, 15.40 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 8.50 

Alfred Bw Proulx, team and labor, 12.00 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 99.00 

Wm. R. Cutter, team and labor, 12.00 

John J. Breor, team and labor, 82.75 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 12.65 

J. T. Powers, team and labor, 81.00 

Samuel Osley, team and labor, 42.00 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 30.00 

Paul Holick, team and labor, 63.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 127.35 

E. A. Breor, team and labor, 30.00 

E. A. Ryan, team and labor, 64.70 

John F. O'Dea, team and labor, 40.00 

W. H. Dickinson, team and labor, 65,00 

M. J. Ryan, team and labor, 21.00 

Roman Strypsko, labor, 21.25 

Mike Superba, labor, 17.50 

Eddie Ganuck, labor, 12.50 

John Dubiel, labor, 10.00 

John Fusek, labor, 24.75 

Wm. Zuroff, labor, 6.25 

Myron Kulesza, labor, 20.00 

John Petcen, labor, 35,00 

John Kostr, labor, 46,75 

Alex Waipeck, labor, 24,00 

Max Kugler, labor, 5,00 

Frank Zeanecki, labor, 10*00 

John Kozash, labor, 5,00 

Steve Koburn, labor, 10,00 

Paul Omasta, labor, 25,00 

Paul Cernack, labor, 5,00 

Frank Wesolowski, labor, 30,00 



22 



Peter Zagrodink, labor, 


28.00 


John Kropeck, labor, 


11.25 


John Wesolowski, labor, 


13.75 


Eugene Jubinville, labor, 


1.00 


John L. Sheehan, labor, 


81.25 


Jacob Gfeis, labor, 


52.50 


H. Stoddard, labor, 


36.65 


Frank Kruliski, labor and sand, 


33.50 


Joseph Gowash, labor, 


27.50 


L. H. Kingsley, sand, 


78.50 


New Eng. Metal Culvert Co., 


480.00 



$2,489.12 

SETTING OUT TREES 

E. L, Graves, labor, 1.50 

PINE BBIDGE STONE BOAD— WITH STATE 

D. P Sheehan, services as Supt., team and 

labor, $424.00 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 225.00 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 30.00 

Samuel Osley, team and labor, 96.00 

John L. Boyle, team and labor, 97.00 

A. W. Morton, team and labor, 42.00 

J. T. Powers, team and labor, 100.00 

John J. Breor, team and labor, 54.00 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 149.50 

Alfred B. Proulx, team and labor, 105.65 

E. A. Breor, team and labor, 38.00 
W. H. Dickinson, team and labor, 151.00 
Jas. L. Day, team and labor, 6.00 
E. A. Ryan, team and labor, 98.00 
C, W. Wade, team and labor, 42.00 



23 



P. W. Mullins, team and labor, 
Paul Holich, tea mand labor, 


110.65 
12.00 


J. 0. Ryan, team and labor, 


265.00 


M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 
Wm. R. Gutter, team and labor, 


60.00 
62.50 


John F. O'Dea, team, labor and sand, 


114.90 


Prank Gowash, labor, 
Geo. Clement, labor, 


20.00 
5.00 


P. A. McGlynn, labor, 
Paul Wirgilewicz, labor, 
John Fusek, labor, 
John L. Sheehan, labor, 


2.50 

25.00 

93.75 

136.50 


Joseph Gowash, labor, 
Jacob Dubiel, labor, 


41.25 
12.50 


Alex Walpeck, labor, 
John Dubiel, labor, 


12.50 
15.00 


H. Stoddard, labor, 


135.33 


Jacob Gels, labor, 
John Pete en, labor, 
John Kostr, labor, 


97,50 
40.00 

88.00 


Frank Wesolowski, labor, 


11,25 


Peter Zagrodink, labor, 

H, D, Smith, coal, 

N. ¥«, N. H, & H. R. R., demurrage, 


16,25 

427,85 

83.00 


J, S. Lane & Son, stone, 
Peter Barnish, fence, 
Merrick Lumber Co., fence, 
Mrs. Laura Belden, lights, 
Alex Donis, team and labor, 


2,595.06 

353,23 

268.47 

6,46 

42,00 


Expended in 1916, 


$6,811.60 
I5S2.93 



24 
KECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN— 1917 



State Aid, 


$162.00 


Tree Warden, 


2.00 


Memorial Day, 


73.20 


Care of Poor, 


796.32 


Contingencies, 


1,075.48 


Town Officers, 


1,671.00 


Schools, 


14,646.33 


Old Bills, 


196.02 


Hampshire County Farm Bureau, 


100.00 


Public Library, 


398.86 


Street Lights, 


3,551.18 


Bonds, Town Officers, 


98.00 


Insurance, 


158.02 


Inspection of Animals, 


412.10 


Ordinary Repairs, 


3,535.16 


Tablet, Centre School, 


168.00 


Repairs, Stone Roads, 


2,778.32 


Fire Dept., supplies, 


571.27 


Smith AgL School, 


473.71 


Hatfield Ferry, 


100.00 


Memorial Building, 


146.33 


Cow JBridge Road, 


319.50 


Washouts, 


2,489.12 


Pine Bridge Road, 


6,811.60 


Setting out trees, 


1.50 


Smith Academy, 


1,000.00 


Oiling roads, 


2,025.10 



20 

School Physician, 50.00 

Care of Cemeeteries, 100.00 



Total, $43,910.12 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES L. DAY, 
JOHN W. KILEY, 
LAWRENCE A. DEINLEIN, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



I have this day examined the books of the Select- 
men and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 7, 1918. 



26 

LIST OF APPROPRIATIONS VOTED TO BE 
RAISED AT THE ANNUAL TOWN MEET- 
ING, HELD FEBRUARY 5th, 1917 



100 " 


Care of Cemeteries (under supervision of 




V. L Society. 


$75 for 


Memorial Day. 


75 " 


Firemen's Muster. 


100 " 


School Physicians; 


100 " 


Tree Warden Work. 


25 " 


Setting Out Trees. 


300 " 


Repairs on Cow Bridge Boad. 


100 " 


Hampshire County Farm Bureau — finan- 




cial aid. 


150 " 


Memorial Hall — care of. 


150 " 


Insurance. 


100 " 


Bonds — Town Officers. 


400 " 


Public Library. 


800 " 


Interest. 


50 " 


Inspection of Animals and Carcasses. 


250 " 


Tuition — Smith Industrial School 


800 " 


Fire Department Supplies. 


500 " 


Underpasses, West Hatfield— $2,000 from 




Treasury. 


1,000 " 


Tuition— Smith Academy, 


1,200 " 


Poor — care of. 


1,600 " 


Salaries — Town Officers. 


1,200 " 


Contingencies. 


2,500 " 


Ordinary^ Repairs— H ighways and 




Bridges. 


2,000 " 


Oiling Stone Roads. 


2,000 " 


Resurfacing and Repairing Stone Roads. 


1,000 " 


Stone Road—North of Pine Bridge — 




$2,000 Assessed in 1919. 



27 

13,500 " Schoole — Maintenance of (and Dog 
Fund). 

~-— __ * : M iff 

$30,075 "■"^ "#m. 

Previously voted on — and to be assessed 
in 1917: 
2,000 " Bradstreet and Chestnut Street Note. 
2,000 ' ' Main and Chestnut Street Note. 
3,485 " Fourth payment and interest — New 

Schoolhouse Loan. 
3,548 " Street Lights. 



$11,033 



$41,108 Total sum to be assessed on the polls and 

estates for 1917. 



28 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD— 1918 



Name. 
Balise, Paul 
Boyle, William F. 
Breor, Arthur R. 
Briggs, Smith E. 
Crafts, Carlton H. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Donovan, Peter J. 
Day, John H. 
Eldridge, Edwin H. 
Fitzgerald, David L. 
Fitzgerald, Thomas J. 
Holley, Dennis E. 
LaMountain, Mac L, 
Marsh, Harry W. 
McOrath, John W. 
Powers, John T. 
Proulx, Leon R. 
Ryan, John C. 
Ryan, Edward A, 
Slattery, Charles F s 
Sheehan, Daniel P. 
Strong, Edson W. 
Weber, Rudolph W. 
Wells, Reuben F. 
Wight, Leiand H. 
Wilkie, Frank E. 
Whalen, Dennis 



Occupation. 
Farmer 
Fanner 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Fanner 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer- 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
. Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 



Treasurers Report 



L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield, 

Dr, 

To balance in Treasury, $2,529,69 

To balance North Main Stone Road Fund, 417.07 

To cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. 

(1915 Taxes), 1,152.97 

To cash rec'd fromE. L. Graves, Coll. 

(1916 Taxes), 13,845.19 

To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll. 

(1917 Taxes), 31,809.32 

Treas. Water Commissioners, 2,900.00 

Dist. Court fines, 319.69 

Hampshire County Jail fines, 40.00 

Slaughter Licenses, 5.00 

Auctioneer's License, 1.00 

Pool License, 2.00 

Jitney License, 1.00 

Licenses — Junk, Fruit, and State, 149.00 

Sealer's Receipts, 63.49 

Rent of Town Hall, 214.15 
Kostanti Kiakoski, bal, sewer en. and tile, 15.00 
Jos. Osipowitez, child Dickinson Hospital, 35.00 

J. E. Porter, sewer en. tile and labor, 252.40 



30 

Fred A. Pease, sewer en. and tile, 41.60 

John R. Brennan, sewer en., 33.00 

Reuben Belden, labor on sewer, 11.22 

M. W. Hayes, sale of tile, 10.50 
0. Belden & Sons, Eddie Koposki inHospital, 15.00 

James L. Day, labor on culvert, 21.25 

P. W. Mulling, sale of tile, 100.04 

Hugh MeLeod, labor Highway Dept., 33.00 
Holy Trinity Society, labor on sefer and tile, 87.05 

Hampshire Mfg. Co,, coal, 239.29 

The Barrett Co., use of Steam Roller, 40.00 

James L, Boyle, tile and drain, 87.35 
Thaddeus Graves, sewer en. labor and tile, 52.51 

Interest on Stone Road Fund, 15.78 

D. P. Sheehan, sale of arsenate of lead, 10.80 

Bishop 3ros., labor, 21.00 

W. J. Szczepanek, labor, 32.32 

Town of Sunderland, work on roller, 9.00 

John F. O'Dea, sale of tickets, 41.22 

Refunding Dog Fund, 76.47 

Town of Whately, tuition, 204.88 

City of Northampton, tuition, 111.81 

State— Income Mass. School Fund, 730.14 

Subsidy — Consumptives, 62.14 

Smith Ind. School— tuition, 296.07 

Inspection of Animals, 86.00 

School Supt. Union, 500.00 

State Aid, 216.00 

Corporation Tax, 494.90 

Nat'l Bank Tax, 761.08 

Income Tax, 3,737.08 

North Main Stone Rd, on Account, 2,500.00 

Town of Whately, use of Steam Roller, 96.00 

Silas Porter Fund— Tablet, 179.87 



31 

To cash rec'd from Temporary Loans, 
Northampton Natl Bank, $12,000.00 
Northampton Nat'l Bank, 10,000.00 
S. N. Bond & Co., 15,000.00 37,000.00 



$101,706.34 



Cr. 



By cash paid Selectmen's orders, 




$43,910.12 


Interest on Water Bonds, 




2,000,00 


District Court Fees, 




96.94 


Bureau of Statistics, 




10.00 


Soldiers' Exemption charge, 




15.44 


Interest on temporary loans, 




923.41 


County Tax, 




5,119.16 


State Tax, 




4,950.00 


State Tax — Bepairs Highways, 




354.00 


Treasurer Sinking Fund, 




900.00 


Balance in Treasury, 




7,942.27 


By cash paid outstanding Notes, 






C. D. Parker & Co., Note No. 1 


9 

* 7 


2,000.00 


Northampton Inst, for Savings, 


Note 




No. 42, 




10,000.00 


Northampton Inst, for Savings, 


Note 




No. 38, 




2,000.00 


Nonotuck Savings Bank, Note No. 3, 


6,000.00 


Northampton National Bank, 


Note 




No. 44, 




12,000.00 


4th Note and Int. — New School 


house, 


3,485.00 




$101,706.34 



32 

IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1915 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $1,152.97 

Assessors ' orders of Abate % 152.87 $1,305.84 

Or. 



By uncollected Taxes, 
Addition to Warrant, 
Interest collected, 


$1,123.01 
78.56 
104.27 $1,305.84 


(1916 Taxes) 


Dr. 




To cash received, 
Uncollected Taxes, 


$13,845.19 

1,860.56 $15,705.75 


Cr. 




By uncollected Taxes, 
Interest collected, 


$15,376.74 

329.01 $15,705.75 


(1917 Taxes) 


Dr. 




To cash received, 
Uncollected Taxes, 


$31,809.32 
14,879.88 $46,689.20 


Cr. 




By Assessors' Warrant, 
Addition to Warrant, 
Interest collected, 


$45,825.50 
824.46 
39.24 $46,689.20 



33 

I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector, 
and find that he has been credited by the Treasurer, 
with the amounts of $1,152.97 of the taxes of the year 
1915— $13,845.19 of the taxes of 1916, and $31,809.32 
of the taxes of 1917. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 7th, 1918. 



WATER SINKING FUND. 

To thirty years four per cent Water Bonds, $50,000.00 

By Sinking Fund, 26,508,06 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

To outstanding Note, due Jan. 21, 1918, $10,000.00 

To outstanding Note, due Feb. 28, 1918, 5,000.00 

To outstanding Note, clue May 28, 1918, 5,000.00 

To outstanding Note, due Aug. 28, 1918, 5,000.00 



$25,000.00 



Cr. 



By uncollected taxes, (1916) $1,860.56 

Uncollected taxes, (1917) 14,879.88 

Due from State Aid, 162.00 

State—Smith School, 236.85 

State — Subsidy for Consumptives, 96.42 
State — Highway Commission, 833.00 



34 

Sewer assessment and labor, 280.50 

Balance in Treasury, 7,942.27 $26,291.48 



Balance in favor of the town, $1,291.48 

L. EL KENGSLEY, Treasurer. 



I have examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the town of Hatfield for the year ending 
December 31, 1917, and find them correct, I find 
Selectmen's orders on file to the amount of forty-three 
thousand, nine hundred ten dollars and twelve cents, 
($43,910.12) with evidence of their payment by him; 
also, cancelled notes and receipts for County and 
State taxes and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of seventy-nine 
hundred and forty-two dollars, and twenty-seven 
cents, ($7,942.27). 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 7, 1918. 



35 



Report of Sinking Fund Commissioners 



We have the following amounts deposited to 
credit of the Sinking Fund :— 

Haydenville Savings Bank, $1,511.85 

Easthampton Savings Bank, 1,408.97 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,447.41 

Nonotuok Savings Bank, 1,122.79 

Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,197.12 

Union Trust Co., Springfield, 2,571.99 

Springfield Institution for Savings, 1,160.27 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 1,187.66 

Mechanics Savings, Bank, Holyoke, 900.00 

Springfield St. Railway Bond, " 1,000.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R, R, Co., Bond, 2,000.00 

B. & M. R. R. Co., Bond, 3,000.00 

IT. S. Liberty Bond, 1,000.00 

Town of Hatfield Water Bond, 7,000.00 

$26,508.06 

M. J. RYAN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 
LOUIS J. PELISSIER, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners, 

January 7, 1918. 

I have this day examined the accounts of the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 



CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the 
twenty-second annual report of the Board of Water 
Commissioners :— 

We have received the past year as follows: — 

Balance of cash on hand from last year's 

aect., $2,698.58 

Cash from collection of Water Rates, 4,899.64 

Interest on Certificates of deposit, 121.00 



$7,719.22 

We have paid the past year as follows: — 

Town of Hatfield, (from water 

rates), $2,900.00 

M. J. Proulx, Commissioner's 

salary, 25.00 

J. W. Kiley, Commissioner's sal- 
ary, 25.00 

C. W. Wade, Commissioner's 

salary, 50.00 

W, H. Riley & Co., supplies, 98.60 



37 




W. B. Darley & Co., magnetic 




needle, 


15.00 


Norwood Engineering' Co., sup. 




and hydrant, 


41.00 


Wm. P. Fitzgibbons, labor, 


29.59 


E. W. Strong, collection of water 




rates, 


146.98 


E. W. Strong, labor and cash 




paid, 


111.75 


E. W. Strong, labor and cash 




paid, (reservoir), 


34.00 



$3,476.92 



Balance in Treasury :- 



Certificates on deposit, First 

National Bank, $4,200.00 

Cash on deposit, First National 

Bank, 42.30 



$7,719,22 



Last spring your Commissioners voted to relieve 
the town of the burden of appropriating annually the 
sum of $500 for the water used in its public buildings, 
tanks, and hydrants, thus making the total water col- 
lections somewhat less than last year; but with the 
number of water takers steadily increasing every 
year, this will soon be more than made good, and we 



38 

live in hopes to see the time when individual rates for 
consumers can be lowered. 

JOHN W. KILEY, 
MICHAEL J. PEOULX, 
JOHN H. STODDARD, 

Water Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the books and accounts 
of the Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the 
Town of Hatfield and find them correct, with vouchers 
on file for all payments, and a balance in the Treasury 
of $4,242.30. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for the 
year 1917 are as follows: — 

^BIRTHS BY MONTH'S 





No. 


Males. 


FemaJ 


January, 


6 


3 


3 


February, 


7 


3 


4 


March, 


7 


2 


4 


April, 


12 


3 


9 


May, 


7 


4 


3 


June, 


6 


3 


3 


July, 


8 


5 


3 


August, 


8 


3 


5 


September, 


5 


2 


3 


October, 


9 




5 


November, 


17 


11 


6 


December, 


9 


5 


4 



101 



43 



*3 



40 
BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 





Father. 


Mother. 


Born in United States, 


15 


16 


Poland, 


78 


76 


Ireland, 





2 


Austro-Hungary, 


6 


5 


Germany, 


1 





Canada, 


1 


2 



101 101 

BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 
74 81 93 92 122 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

No. 

January, 5 

February, 2 

March, 

April, 3 

May, 1 

June, 5 

July, 1 

August, 1 

September, 

October, 5 

November, 5 

December, 

28 



41 

First marriage of both parties, 25. 
Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 1. 
Second marriage of bride, first of groom, 1. 
Second marriage of bride, first of groom, 1. 
Second marriage of both parties, 1. 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 48 and 
20 11-12 years of age, respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 41 and 18 
years of age, respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 





Groom. 


Bride 


Born in the United States, 


12 


14 


Poland, 


14 


12 


Austro -Hungary, 


2 


2 



28 



28 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


32 


26 


33 


38 


29 




DEATHS BY MONTHS 








No, 


Males. 


Femalse. 


January, 

February, 

Mrach, 

April, 

May, 

June, 




4 

4 
6 
4 



1 


2 
2 
4 
3 





2 
2 
2 
1 



1 



42 



July, 
August, 
September, 
October, 






3 
1 
4 
3 




2 

3 
2 




1 
1 

1 
1 


November, 






5 




3 




2 


December, 






6 




5 




1 






41 




26 




15 










No. 


Males. 


Females 


Under 1 year of age 


» 




15 




8 


7 


Between 1 


and 10 


years, 




4 




3 


1 


Between 10 and 20 


years, 




3 




1 


2 


Between 20 


and 30 


years, 




5 







5 


Between 30 


and 40 


years, 




1 




1 





Between 40 and 50 


years, 




4 




4 





Between 50 and 60 


years, 




2 




2 





Between 60 and 70 


years, 




1 




1 





Between 70 


and 80 


years, 




5 




4 


1 


Between 80 


and 90 


years, 




1 







1 



41 24 17 

Age of oldest person deceased (female) 87 years. 

NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



Ellen C. Nolan 
Marguerite Darr 
Eugene I. Morton 
Howard M. Graves 
Bronyslaw Stiwoski 
Julia Johnson 
Joseph Kisluk 



George A. Chandler 
Benjamin M. Warner 
Madeline Rogalinski 
Helen Korza 
Valentine Parada 
Eddie Korpuski 
Julian Kostik 



43 



Elizabeth Ondras 
Mary G. Dickinson 
Arnold Graves 
Frank Tobacco 
John Mnlany 
Louis Sidowski 
Helen R, Bitner 
John Martalitz 



John Onbras 
Mary Darmofal 
Lndwik Krahel 
Edward W. Cnrtis 
Stella Hanko 
Joseph Ciociork 
John Vollinger 
Levi L. Pease 



Dog Licenses 

The number of dogs licensed during the year end- 
ing November 30, 1917, with the receipts and settle- 
ments of the account with the Treasurer, is as follows: 



52 Male dogs at $2.00 each, 
3 Female dogs at $5.00 each, 



Less f©es, 55 dogs at 20 cents each, 
Paid to County Treasurer, 

Respectfully submitted, 



$104.00 
15.00 

$119.00 
11.00 

$108.00 



L. H. KINGSLEY, Town Clerk. 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed Personal Estate, 


$376,599.00 


Value ot assessed Real Estate, 


1,734,806.00 


Total value of assessed estate, 


$2,111,405 


Value of assessed buildings, 


$924,704.00 


Value of assessed land, 


810,102.00 




$1,734,806.00 


Number of polls assessed, 


743 


Residents assessed on property, 


411 


Non-residents assessed on property, 


76 


For poll tax only, 


444 


Rate of tax per $1,000, 


$21.00 


Number of Horses assessed, 


463 


Cows, 


230 


Neat Cattle, 


25 


Fowls, 


210 


Dwelling houses, 


406 


Acres of land, 


9,246 


State Tax, 


$4,950.00 


State Highway Tax, 


354.00 


County Tax, 


5,119.16 


Town Tax, 


34,727.31 


Overlayings, 


67^.03 



$45,825.50 



45 

Estimated Bank and Corporation Tax, $1,200.00 

State Income Tax, 3,680.69 

Excise Tax, 792.75 

Addition to Warrant, 31.71 

Value of property exempt from taxation under 
Chapter 409, Acts of 1909:— 

Literary Institutions, $75,011.00 

Church Property, 31,650.00 

Eesectfully submitted, 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
P. W. MULLINS, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of Hatfield Public Library: — 

I herewith present the following report : 

The number of bound volumes in the library is 
5,792. Of these 1,116 are in the juvenile department. 

This year 260 books have been added to the libra- 
ry, 115 for adults 145 for boys and girls. 

The circulation has materially increased during 
the year, especially among the children. 

The total circulation has been 6,411. Nearly 500 
persons are patrons of the library, representing about 
220 families. 

The 25 books in the Polish language loaned by the 
Massachusetts Library Association have been much 
appreciated by the Polish people as shown by their 
constant circulation. 

The library is open on Tuesdays from 3 to 5 P. M. 
Saturdays from 3 to 5 P. M, and 7 to 9 P. M. 

The present assistants are Mrs. Ula Dehey on 
Saturday evenings, and Miss Margaret Lovett Tues- 
day afternoons. 

During the campaign for the Library War Fund 
$148.00 was raised. 



47 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 




Received from the Town, 




$230.30 


Expenditures 




Assistants' Salary, 

Library supplies, 

Books, 

Express and postage, 

Cleaning, 




$30.30 

14.52 

7.58 

1.28 

1.00 


Balance, 


$54.68 
$175,62 


ELLEN A. 


WAITE, 


Librarian. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY SINCE DEC. 

1916 



Fiction 



The Light in the Clearing, 
Rainbow's End, 
Bromley Neighborhood, 
The Prisoner, 
Johnstone o the Border, 
Winston of the Prairie, 
Miss Minerva and Wm. Gri 
The Major, 
Cinderella Jane, 
Men Who Wrought, 
Where Your Treasure Is, 
The Rising Tide, 
Hundredth Chance, 



Irving Bacheller 

Rex Beach 

Alice Brown 

Alice Brown 

Harold Bindloss 

Harold Bindloss 

•een Hill, Calhoun 

Ralph Conner 

Marjorie Benton Cooke 

Ridge well Cullum 

Holman Day 

Margaret Deland 

Ethel M. Dell 



48 



Skinner's Dress Suit, 

The Bird House Man, 

The Way of the Wind, 

A Definite Object, 

Freelands, 

The Rainbow Trail, 

Wildfire, 

The Last of the Plainsmen, 

Lone Star Ranger, 

Light of the Western Stars, 

The Border Legion, 

Dark Hollow, 

Mystery of the Hasty Arrow, 

The Short Cut, 

Right Stuff, 

Cabbages and Kings, 

The Four Million, 

Those Gillespies, 

The Magnificent Adventure, 

The Broken Grate, 

Les Miserables (■abridged), 

Sudden Jim, 

Kildares of Storm, 

The Lifted Veil, 

The High Heart, 

Mary 'Gusta, 

Cape Cod Stories, 

Cap'n Eri, 

Woman Haters, 

Extricating Obadiah, 

The Red Planet, 

Emmy Lou, Her s Book, 

Emmy Lou 's Road to Grace, 

Salina, 

The Wondrous Wife, 

Richard Richard, 



Henry Irving Dodge 
Walter P. Baton 
Eugenia B. Frothingham 
Jeffrey Farnol 
John Galsworthy 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
Anna Katherine Green 
Anna Katherine Green 
Jackson Gregory 
Ian Hay 
0. Henry 
0. Henry 
William J. Hopkins 
Emerson Hough 
Emerson Hough 
Victor Hugo 
Clarence Kelland 
Eleanor Kelly 
Basil King 
Basil King- 
Joseph C. Lincoln 
Joseph C. Lincoln 
Joseph C. Lincoln 
Joseph C. Lincoln 
Joseph C. Lincoln 
William Locke 
George Madden Martin 
George Madden Martin 
George Madden Martin 
Charles Marriott 
Hughes Mearns 



49 



Ladies Must Live, 

Green Fancy, 

Luck of the Irish, 

Anne's House of Dreams, 

The Wind Before the Dawn, 

The Undertow, 

The Heart of Rachael, 

Mar tie, the Unconquered, 

The Cinema Murder, 

The Ways of These Women, 

His Family, 

The Road to Understanding, 

Song of the Cardinal, 

The Brown Study, 

Strawberry Acres, 

Round the Corner in day Str 

Red Pepper's Patients, 

Calvary Alley, 

Bab, a Sub-Deb, 

Seven Miles to Arden, 

A Country Lawyer, 

Anne Feversham, 

The Prairie Wife, 

Penrod and Sam, 

Mary Morel and, 

The Girl at Big Loon Point, 

Missing, 

The Coryston Family, 

Lady Connie, 

Eltham House, 

Daddy Long Legs, 

Dear Enemy, 

The Four-Pool Mystery, 

The Gold Bag, 

Over the Border, 

El Supremo, 



Alice Duer Miller 

George Barr McCutcheon 

Harold McGrath 

L. M. Montgomery 

Dell H. Munger 

Kathleen Norris 

Kathleen Norris 

Kathleen Norris 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

Ernest Poole 

Eleanor Porter 

Jean Stratton Porter 

Grace Richmond 

Grace Richmond 

eet, Grace Richmond 

Grace Richmond 

Alice Hegan Rice 

Mary Roberts Rinehart 

Ruth Sawyer 

Henry A. Shute 

J. C. Snaith 

Arthur Stringer 

Booth Tarkington 

Marie Van Vorst 

George Van Schaick 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

♦Jean Webster 

Jean Webster 

Jean Webster 

Carolyn Wells 

Herman Whitaker 

Edward Lucas White 



50 



Why Not? 

Wishing Ring Man, 

Still Jim, 

The Heart of the Desert, 

Lydia of the Pines, 

It Happened in Egypt, 



Margaret Widdemer 

Margaret Widdemer 

Honore Willsie 

Honore Willsie 

Honore Willise 

0. N. and A. M. Williamson 



Books on the War 



Mr. Britling Sees it Through, 

The First Hundred Thousand 

(retting Together, 

The Basis of Durable Peace, 

The Vermilion Box, 

A Student in Arms, 

My Four Years in Germany, 

Over the Top, 

The Worn Doorstep, 

Hilltop on the Marne, 

On the Edge of the War Zone 

Christine, 

Out of Their Own Mouths, 

When the Prussian's Came to 

Somewhere in France, 



H. G. Wells 
Ian Hay 
Ian Hay 

Cosmos 

E. V. Lucas 

Donald Hankey 

James W. Gerard 

Arthur Guy Empey 

Margaret Sherwood 

Mildred Aldrich 

Mildred Aldrich 

Alice Cholmondeley 

Poland, 

Laura Turczynowicz 
Richard Harding Davis 



Miscellaneous 

How to Study Birds, Herbert K. Job 

The Sport of Bird Study, Herbert K. Job 

A Son of the Middle Border, autobiography of Hamlin 

Garland. 
Diplomatic Days, Edith O'Shaughnessy 

Handbook of New England, 
The City of Domes. 
Feeding the Family, Mary Swartz Rose 



51 



Canning and How to Use Canned Food. 
Adventures and Letters of Richard Harding Davis. 
The Stars and Stripes. A History of the Flag. 

Boys' and Girls' Books 



Seven Little Sisters, 

The Last of the Chiefs, 

Little Men, 

Eight Cousins, 

Tom Swift in Caves of Ice, 

Outdoor Chums at Cabin Point, 

Four Afoot, 

Four in Camp, 

Kingsford Quarter, 

Forward Pass, 

Winning His Game, 

Fifty Famous People, 

Hero of Erie, Oliver H. Perry, 

Midshipman Farragut, 

Fagots and Flames, 

Campfire Girls at Brightwood, 

Taking a Stand, 

Peter Pan, 

True Story of Christopher Columbu 

True Story of Lafayette, 

True Story of George Washington, 

True Story of IT. S. Grant, 

The American Sailor, 

Cattle Ranch to College, 

Outdoor Girls at Deepdale, 

Outdoor Girls in a Motor Boat, 

Outdoor Girls at Rainbow Lake, 

Outdoor Girls in a Winter Camp, 

Williams of West Point, 

Stories and Poems from Kipling. 



Jane Andrews 

Joseph Altsheler 

Louise M. Alcott 

Louise M. Alcott 

Victor Appleton 

Allen 

Ralph Henry Barbour 

Ralph Henry Barbour 

Ralph Henry Parbour 

Ralph Henry Barbour 

Ralph Henry Barbour 

James Baldwin 

James Barnes 

James Barnes 

Amy E. Blanch ard 

Amy E. Blanchard 

Amy E. BHanchard 

J. M. Biarrie 

Elbridge prooks 

Elbridge Brooks 

Elbridge Brooks 

Elbridge Brooks 

Elbridge Brooks 

Doubleday 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura, Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Hugh S. Johnson 



52 



The Boy Captain, 

Ways of Wood Folk, 

Scottish Chiefs, 

King of the Golden River, 

The Boy with the U. S. Fisherie 

Sebago-Wohelo Canipfire Girls, 

Florence Nnghtiiigale, 

On the Plains with Custer, 

Campfire Girls at Hillside, 

Five Little Peppers, 



James Otis 

Wm. J. Long 

Jane Porter 

John Buskin 

Robert Wheeler 

Rogers 

Laura E. Richards 

E. L. Sabin 

Margaret L<. Sanderson 

Margaret Sidney 



Five Little Peppers in the Little Brown House, 

Margaret Sidnev 
Five Little Peppers Midway, 
Five Little Peppers Abroad, 
Five Little Peppers Grown Up, 
Our Davy Pepper, 
Adventures of Joel Pepper, 
Boys of the Border, 
Treasure Island, 
Field and Forest, 
Gulliver's Travels, 
The Pennant, 
C'apt. Dan Richards, 
Three Colonial Boys, 
Trail of the Mohawk Chief, 
Scouting with Daniel Boone. 
Robin Hood and His Merry Outlaws, 
Boy Scouts Year Book, 19i7. 
Three Years Behind the Guns, 
Aesop's Fables. 
The Brownie Primer, 
Tale of Brownie Beaver, 
Tale of Paddy Muskrat, 
Tale of Peter Mink, 
Tale of Tommy Fox, 



Margaret Sidney 

Margaret Sidney 

Margaret Sidney 

Margaret Sidney 

Margaret Sidney 

Mary P. Wells Smith 

Robert Louis Stevenson 

Frank Spearman 

Jonathan Swift 

Everett Tomlinson 

Everett Tomlinson 

Everett Tomlinson 

Everett Tomlinson 

Everett Tomlinson 

Tilney 

Lieut. Tisdale 

N. M. Banta 

Arthur Scott Bailey 

Arthur Scott Bailey 

Arthur Scott Bailey 

Arthur Scott Bailev 



53 

Mother Westwind ' ' How ' ' Stories, 

Thornton W. Burgess 
Mother Westwind "When" Stories, 

Thornton W. Burgess 
Adventures of Buster Bear, Thornton W. Burgess 

Adventures of Grandfather Frog, 

Thornton W. ^Burgess 
Adventures of Chatterer, the Red Squirrel, 

Thornton W. Burgess 
Adventures of Jerry Muskrat, Thornton W. Burgess 
Ad ventures of Mr. Mocker, Thornton W. Burgess 

Adventures of Old Man Coyote, Thornton W. Burgess 
Adventures of Old Mr. Toad, Thornton W. Burgess 
Adventures of Paddy tin- Beaver, 

Thornton W. Burgess 
Adventures of Peter Cottontail Thornton W. Burgess 
Adventures of Prickly Porky, Thornton W. ,Burgess 
Adventures of Poor Mrs. Quack, 

Thornton W. Burgess 
Adventures of Reddy Fox, Thornton W. Burgess 

Adventures of Sammy Jay, Thornton W. Burgess 

Adventures of Unc Billy Possum, 

Thornton W. Burgess 
Christmas Holidays at Merryvale, Alice Hale Burnett 
Father Brown's Indian Tales, Alice Hale Burnett 

Merryvale Boys on a Farm, Alice Hale Burnett 

Hallowe'en at Merryvale, Alice Hale Burnett 

Circus Day at Merryvale, Alice Hale Burnett 

Picnic Day at Merryvale, Alice Hale Burnett 

Beth's Garden Party, Alice Hale Btirnett 

A Day at the Fair, Alice Hale Burnett 

Geraldine's Birthday, Alice Hale Burnett 

Mary Entertains the Sewing Circle, Alice H. Burnett 
Sarah Crewe, Frances Hodgson Burnett 

Little Small Red Hen, May Byron 

Merchant Ships and What They Bring, Braine 



54 



Pinocchio, 

Dolly and Molly at the Circus, 

Four-footed Folk, 

Bobbsey Twins, 

Bobbsey Twins in the Country, 

Bobbsey Twins at Meadow Brook, 

Bobbsey Twins on a Houseboat, 

Bobbsey Twins at the Seashore, 

Bobbsey Twins at School, 

Bobbsey Twins at Snow Lodge, 

Shaggy-coat, 

Little Brother to the Scouts, 

Christmas Surprise Party, 

Dotty Dimple at Home, 

Dotty Dimple at Her Grandmother' 

Dotty Dimple at Play, 

Dotty Dimple at School, 

Dotty Dimple Out West, 

Dotty Dimple, Flyaway, 

Little Prudy, 

Little Prudy 's Cousin Grace, 

Little Prudy 's Captain Horace, 

Little Prudy 's Dotty Dimple, 

Little Prudy 's Story Book, 

Little Prudy 's Sister Susie, 

Jennie's Bird House, 

Marjorie's Play Days, 

Little Mother Goose, 111. 

The Gingerbread Man, 111. 

Cinderella, HI 

Children in Japan, 111. 

Little Indian Maidens, 

Fairy Tales, 

English Fairy Tales, 

Goody-Naughty Book, 

Behind the Big Glass Windows, 



C. Callode 

Elizabeth Gordon 

Elizabeth Gordon 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Clarence Hawkes 

E. A. W.Hyde 

Caroline Jacobs 

Sophie May 

s Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Sophie May 

Lillie F. Merriam 

Mrs. Geo. A. Paul 

by Willy Pogany 

by Willy Pogany 

. by Willy Pogany 

by Willy Pogany 

Beatrice B. Ruyl 

Charles Perrault 

Ernest Rhys 

Sarah C. Rippey 

Louise Robinson 



55 

Tale of Mr. Tod, Beatrix Potter 

Tale of Mrs. Tittlemoust -, 3eatrix Potter 

Tale of Pigling Bland Beatrix Potter 

Tale of Two Bfad Mice, Beatrix Potter 

Tale of Tom Kitten, Beatrix Potter 

Tale of Timmy Tiptoes, Beatrix Potter 

Tale of Tailor of Gloucester, Beatrix Potter 

Tale of Biopsy Bunnies, Beatrix Potter 

Tale of Jeremy Fisher, Beatrix Potter 
Robert Louis Stevenson Reader. 

Heidi, Johanna Spyri 

Told by the Sandman, Abbie P. Walker 

^Billy Popgun, Milo Winter 

Water Babies, Charles Kingsley 

Magazines and Periodicals 

Harper's Magazine. 
Century Magazine. 
American Magazine. 
Everybody's Magazine. 
Good Housekeeping. 
National Geographic. 
Popular Mechanics. 
Forest and Stream. 
Youth's Companion. 
John Martin's. 
American Boy. 
Little Polks. 

IRVING A. FLINT, 

Term Expires 1920. 
MPS. MARGARET MULLANY, 

Term Expires 1919. 
MISS MARGARET RYAN, 

Term Expires 1918. 
Library Trustees: — 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1917 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John F. O'Dea, Chairman, Term expires 1920 

Adam J. Smith, Secretary, Term expires 1919 

Oscar E. Belden, Term expires 1918 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Clinton J. Richards 
77 Main St., Hatfield Telephone 36-2 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield 
schools). 

C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet, and West Hat- 
field schools). 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

S. W. Kingsley 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Term opens Jan. 2, 1918, closes Feb. 21, 1918 
Term opens Mar. 4, 1918, closes Apr. 18, 1918 
Term opens Apr. 29, 1918, closes June 21, 1918 
Term opens Sept. 9, 1918, closes Dec. 20, 1918 



Report of School Committee 



The Committee have very little out of the ordinary 
routine to report. The work of the schools has pro- 
ceeded along the usual lines of effort. The scarcity of 
fuel has caused us some anxiety, and at the time of 
writing this report our stock of coal at several build- 
ings is low, and it seems somewhat unccertain as to 
whether we can secure enough to carry us through 
the winter. 

No extensive repairs have been made this year. 
The heating arrangements at the Hill, West, and 
North buildings need to be overhauled and renewed or 
repaired. A special report concerning the West Hat- 
field building has been made by the committee appoint- 
ed for that purpose. 

At the April meeting of the Joint District Com- 
mittee it was unanimously voted to ask the State 
Board of Education to reorganize the district by the 
removal of Bernardston. In response to this request 
the State Board assigned Bernardston to the Northeld 
district and formed a new one consisting of Hadley 
and Hatfield. These two towns now have more 
schools and pupils than the three towns together had 
iive years ago. 

The financial report follows. The unexpended 
surplus represents about what we would have paid for 
coal if it had been possible to get it. 



61 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending- Dec. 31, 1917 

Resources 



From State: 






Superintendent of Schools, 


$500:00 




School Fund, 


730.14 









$1,230.14 


Tuition: 






Whately, 


$204.88 




Northampton, 


111.81 


316.69 
76.47 


Dog Tax, 




Tickets sold, 




41.22 


Town appropriation, 




13,500.00 


Total Resources, 


$15,164.52 


Expenditures 






Salaries: 






Teachers, 


$8,981.33 




Janitors, 


1,438.05 




Supervisors, 


449.90 




Superintendent o Schools, 


810,00 




School Committee, 


65.00 


$11,744.28 


Books and Supplies, 




1,105.99 


Fuel, 




1,077.92 


Repairs, 




450.01 


Transportation, 




103.05 


Miscellaneous, 




165.08 


Total Expenditures, 


$14,646.33 


Unexpended, 




$518.19 



JOHN F. O'DEA, Chairman. 



Report of the 

Superintendent of Schools 



This report will at least have the merit of brevity. 
It will relate chiefly to the business administration of 
the schools and leave the consideration of purely pro- 
fessional matters for another time and place. 

CENSUS AND ENROLLMENT 

The ceusus of April, 1917, showed that there were 
in town 541 children between the ages of five and six- 
teen years. Owing to a change in the law there was no 
census taken in 1916, but by the census of September, 
1915, there were 498 children between these ages. This 
would show a gain of about 30 per year. For several 
years there has been a corresponding gain of about 30 
pupils in the enrollment, until this year, when the 
number has fallen from 468 in October, 1916, to 465 in 
October, 1917. Comparison! of these figures Would 
seem to indicate not a falling off in the number of chil- 
dren of school age in town, but that, owing to the de- 
mand for labor, less children outside the age of legal 
requirement — seven to fourteen — are attending school. 

ATTENDANCE 

Regular attendance is necessary not only to pro- 
mote the child's own interest and progress, but also for 
the sake of his classmates, whose work is always hin- 
dered by his irregularity. 



63 

The attendance this year has been unsatisfactory, 
owing to several causes. An epidemic of measles and 
ether forms of illness have kept many pupils from at- 
tending regularly. The unusual severity of the weath- 
er has also interfered with the attendance of some, es- 
pecially the younger children who live at a distance 
from the school buildings. 

The, greatest hindrance to regular attendance, 
however, is the increasing demand for the help of the 
older children on the farms. It may be justifiable at 
times to excuse a child for this reason, but only in an 
emergency when no other help can be secured. 

The child's education should be the first consid- 
eration of the parent as well as of the public, and any 
interference with his education can be justified only 
by the most extreme need. 

TEACHERS 

Between September, 1916, and September, 1917, 
there were nine changes in the teaching force — more 
than one-half the number employed. We have been 
able to find well qualified teachers to fill the places of 
those who resigned, but it has been no easy tusk. The 
selection of competent teachers is the most difficult and 
important duty that devolves on school officials. It 
would be too much to expect that a teacher should not 
sometime be chosen whose work would not be alto- 
gether acceptable. Bait the fact that nearly all the 
teachers who have left our schools have found ready 
employment in larger places at higher salaries, proves 
that we have usually been fortunate in our choice. 
The selection of teachers would be much simpler and 
more satisfactory if a higher salary could be offered. 
The increase in teachers' salaries within the last two 
years has been more than offset bv the increased cost 



64 

of living, so that if a majority of our teachers were 
not able to reduce their expenses by living at home, 
they would be actually receiving a smaller net income 
than two years ago. I would recommend that begin- 
ning with the next school year a salary schedule for 
grade teachers be adopted, placing the minimum sal- 
ary at $500 per year, and that this be increased up to 
$650, according to efficiency and time of service. The 
salaries of principals should be determined in each 
case by the requirements of the position and qualifica- 
tions of the candidate. 

SUPERVISORS 

Miss Boyle continues as supervisor of music with 
the same degree of success as in previous years. While 
she was absent during the spring term on account of 
injury, Miss Mary Woods substituted very satisfac- 
torily for her. 

Miss Bede Bjurman of the Normal Are School has 
been secured as supervisor of drawing to succeed Miss 
Landers who resigned last year. 

We have no supervisor of penmanship, but an 
arrangement has been made with our former super- 
visor, Miss Kilmurry, to meet the. Hatfield teachers 
for a monthly conference. The outlines furnished are 
the same as those used in Northampton, where Miss 
Kilmurry is the supervisor. 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

After careful examination of several modern 
series of arithmetics the Wentworth-Smith series was 
finally selected. It is proving to be a marked improve- 
ment on the series displaced. 



65 

The course in history has been enriched hy add- 
ing Blaisdell's "Story of American History' ' for the 
fifth grade and "Old World Hero Stories' ' for the 
sixth grade. 

The course in Geography has also been improved 
by placing Frye's New Geography in the fifth and 
sixth grades. 

The need of economy is being brought home to us 
by the continued high cost of supplies. Many articles 
have increased from fifty to one hundred per cent in 
cost and "the end is not yet." 

BUILDINGS AND REPAIRS 

The Center building continues to justify the wis- 
dom of the town in its erection Only incidental re- 
pairs will be needed here. With only a slight increase 
in enrollment we shall have room to accommodate all 
our pupils in the Center and Hill buildings for some 
time. 

The furnaces in the Hill building are in bad con- 
dition. When they are replaced, a system for heating 
and ventilating school rooms and toilets could be ar- 
ranged without a large additional expense. 

The North Hatfield building will need to be com- 
pletely repaired and improved before many years. The 
basement in its present form is inconvenient, if not 
dangerous, and should be enlarged so as to contain 
toilets and an adequate heating system. If the enroll- 
ment continues to increase we shall not have room 
very much longer for the pupils who come from just 
across the line in Whately. 

To accommodate the increasing number of pupils 
at Bradstreet anew floor and equiupment will sometime 
be required for the room that is now used for recita- 
tions. 



66 

I can fully agree with the conclusions of the com- 
mittee who have investigated the West Hatfield 
building, that only the most necessary repairs should 
be made this year, since it is evident that a new build- 
ing is the only adequate remedy for the conditions 
there. The heating arrangements, though correct in 
theory, have some practical defects that should be cor- 
rected as far as possible before another winter. 

The demand for repairs is most urgent at the 
West Hatfield and Hill buildings. Other buildings can 
be used without serious danger or inconvenience with 
only incidental repairs until a return to normal busi- 
ness conclitons warrant more extensive operations. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Cumulative record cards, properly indexed, have 
been introduced this year. These will give a history 
of each pupil throughout his school course. They will 
be also used as transfer cards when a pupil goes from 
one school or town to another. 

More than one hundred fifty children had gardens 
during the summer of 1917. In spite of unfavorable 
weather and other difficulties, some very fair crops 
were raised and creditable exhibits were made at each 
of the school buildings in town. Some of the best pro- 
ducts from these local exhibits, together with samples 
from the girls' canning club, wore sent to the county 
fair where they received second prize for school ex- 
hibit. This work will probably be continued during 
the season of 1918, with more complete organization 
and supervision. 

Dental inspection is now authorized by law and 
many towns are furnishing it with good results. Physi- 
cians are agreed that many diseased conditions among 



67 

children are traceable to defective teeth. I recommend 
that dental inspection be provided at the opening of 
the next school year. 

Schools and teachers are being constantly asked 
to engage in activities related in some way to the 
world war or conditions growing out of it. In order 
that the program of public education may not be inter- 
rupted, and that the schools be kept free from affairs 
that would interfere with their fundamental task, a 
committee has been formed with Payson Smith, Com- 
missioner of Education, as chairman, to advise in re- 
gard to war relief activities. In a recent circular let- 
ter this committee advises that the Junior Red Cross 
be the one recognized agency of the schools in relief 
work. This organization offers unusual opportunities 
to our children for patriotic service and training in 
citizenship, and all schools will be given the privilege 
of being enrolled as school auxiliaries. 

Without a noble ideal there can be no worthy ac- 
complishment. A noted educator has said, "Educa- 
tion should develop love for labor, skill in effort, ten- 
derness of sympathy, joy of appreciation, sensitive- 
ness for the right, alertness of intellect, and strength 
to hold on. It should give the student a mastery of the 
printed page and make known to him the message of 
star, rock, flower, bird, painting, and symphony. It 
should also help him to find his work, render his ut- 
most of service, and feel his personal responsibilty. ' ' 

Could we have a higher ideal for the inspiration 
of all our school activities'! 

CLINTON J. RICHARDS. 



Report of Supervisor of Drawing 



The work in drawing, during the past year, has 
been such as to train the child to express freely and 
rapidly by use of the pencil, crayons, scissors, and 
paints such objects as are closely connected with the 
child's daily life, to encourage ingenuity by construc- 
tive plan drawing and construction of objects, to ac- 
quaint the child with common flower forms, to develop 
originality in design, to help each child gain some 
knowledge of freehand lettering together with an in- 
telligent use of the ruler. The aim has also been to 
instil in the child of the grammar grades, through dis- 
cussion and comparison, taste for good home furnish- 
ings. 

The scissors have been the favored medium in 
the elementary grades. By their use children attain 
comparatively good results which serve to give them 
confidence and interest in their work. In the rush of 
everyday life, children are often forgotten as needing 
amusement. A short course in paper doll making and 
dress design for dolls is being carried on in the lower 
grades with the aim to help in amusing the children at 
home and, also, to create a desire to originate. 

Problems in design and construction, such as the 

making of lamp shades, blotter pads and letter holders, 
have been taken up in the grammer grades. Much in- 
terest has been apparent where the children have been 
carefully guided and given time to complete their ob- 
jects. _ 



69 

Considering the fact that only one hour a week 
has been allotted to drawing, most satisfactory results 
have been produced. All appreciation of success is 
due the teachers who have done their work faithfully. 

There are still niany practical problems along the 
lines of industrial art to be taught in the public schools 
of Hatfield. It is with good faith that teacher and 
pupil go to make this kind of work count toward bet- 
ter and more efficient citizenship. 

BEDA BJURMAN. 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



The study of public school music has been con- 
fined chiefly to the principles of music, vocal sight 
reading and singing of songs and choruses. The work 
has been carried out as in former years. 

One of the weak poits in our grade work this year 
has been deficient pitches or the inability to think 
tone. However, this is gradually being overcome 
through the sincere efforts of our faithful grade teach- 
ers, and in many o f the grades a marked improvement 
in tone quality has been shown. 

Within the last few years steps have been taken 
to broaden the study of music in the schools by intro- 
ducing a course of music appreciation or " Listening 
Lessons in Music. ' ' The aim of this course is to teach 
the child to concentrate and listen intelligently, also to 
become familiar with the best of music and our lead- 
ing composers and artists. 

As we already possess the Victrola, we hope to 
introduce this valuable course in our public schools in 
the near future. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



Report of Medical Inspectors 



The work of medical inspection has been con- 
ducted along the same lines as in previous years. 

The co-ordination between the teachers and in- 
spectors has improved as the teachers have become 
more familiar with the work. They recognize quickly 
those cases that need to be reported immediately to 
the physicians for investigation, thereby minimizing 
the danger of epidemics among the school children. 

However, in some of the milder contagious dis- 
eases, a child may be absent from school a day or two, 
or even at times, not being absent from session, or 
may be ill Saturday or Sunday, during which time 
they may or may not have had an eruption. These 
children on returning to school may start an epidemic, 
and the cause not be recognized. 

Such cases do not necessarily cast reflection on 
those concerned, as many of the contagious diseases, 
even the dangerous ones, are at times very mild. 
Even to such extent that some individuals may harbor 
1li e germs of these contagious diseases without being 
ill. This is notoriously so in regard to diphtheria. 

We have been fortunate, in spite of severe weath- 
er, not to have serious epidemics to combat this year. 

CHAS. A. BYRNE, M. D. 
A. J. BONNEVILLE, M. D. 



72 



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73 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE 
WEST HATFIELD SCHOOL HOUSE 



The committee appointed have made a careful in- 
vestigation of conditions at the West Hatfield school. 
We find, as stated in the School Committee's report 
last year, that "the heating, lighting, ventilation, and 
toilet arrangements are inconvenient and unsanitary. ' 7 
Furthermore, any attempt to make the present build- 
ing satisfactory would cost more than it is worth. And 
even after the most complete repairs were made the 
plan and construction of the house would be unsatis- 
factory. 

Under normal business conditions, the committee 
would recommend the erection of a two-room modern 
building, with both rooms on the first floor; but con- 
sidering the difficulty and high cost of securing labor 
and materials, we do not feel like urging that any 
building be erected this year. We further recommend 
that minor repairs be made as needed, and that prepar- 
ation be made for a new building and a larger play 
ground when the voters of the town are ready for suet 
action. 

JOHNF. O'DEA, 
0. E. BELDEN, 
A. J. SMITH, 
J. L. DAY, 
J. W. KILEY, 
D. A. DEINLEIN 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 




Town of Hatfield 



for the: 



Year Ending December 31, 1918 



HERALD JOB PRIN1 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Finance Committee 



For the coming year, owing to the high price of 
labor and stone, (the two principal ingredients of road 
making), yonr Finance Committee recommend: — no 
new road construction for this year; but instead to ap- 
propriate and apply every dollar not needed for re- 
pairs of bridges, to the maintenance of — (including 
resurfacing, oiling, patching, and general upkeep) of 
our 52 miles of stone, gravel, and dirt roads, other 
than state. 

While we have now about 10 miles of stone roads, 
a good share of this demands immediate attention, 
such as resurfacing, oiling, and patching; and to show 
that the Highway Commission thinks that this con- 
dition is state-wide, they are offering as an induce- 
ment to help towns maintain roads already construct- 
ed, a sum of $50 per mile, under certain conditions — 
which we recommend accepting. 

We also recommend as follows: — 

Obligations already voted on and to be assessed in 
1919:— 

Street Lights— last year of contract , 3,548 

Sixth payment and interest — New Schoolhouse 

Loan, 3,305 

6,853 



Article 5 — Highways. 



Ordinary repairs, Bridges, etc., 1,500 

Bepairs,inaintenance, oiling of roads, other 

than state, 6,500 



Article 6 — Necessary town expenses. 

Contingencies, 

Bonds — Town Officers, 

Care of Memorial Hall, 

Salaries — Town Officers, 

Poor — care of 

Interest, 

Insurance, 

Inspection, 

Tree Warden, 

Fire Department, 

Schools — maintenance, 



1,300 

100 

150 

1,700 

1,000 

850 

100 

200 

150 

500 

14,000 



Article 7 — Memorial Day, 
Article 10 — Care of Cemeteries, 
Article 11 — Public Library, 
Article 14 — School Physicians, 
Article 15 — Smith Industrial School, 
Article 19 — Hampshire Farm Bureau, 
Article 18 — Smith Academy — Tuition, 

Article 22 — Cement Walk — Academy corner 
south, 



20,050 

75 
100 

500 

100 

250 

150 

2,000 

1,000 



$39,078 



Under Article 18, it has heretofore been the cus- 
tom of appropriating the sum of $1,000. — 'Tis only 
fair to say this extra $1,000 was not unanimously 
recommended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHX C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
GEORGE 8. BELDEX. 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Warrant for Town 
Meeting, February 3, 1919. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To L. H. Kingsley, one of the Constables of the 
town of Hatfield, in said County, Greeting: — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts you are hereby directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the town of Hatfield, qualified to vote 
in elections and town affairs, to meet in the Town Hali 
in said Hatfield on Monday, the 3d day of February, 
next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and there ta 
act on the following named articles, to wit: — 

Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at 
said meeting. 

Article 2 — To choose all necessary town officers 
for the ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; 
one Assessor for 3 years, and one Assessor for 2 years, 
(to fill vacancy) Town Treasurer; one School Com- 
mittee for 3 years; one Water Commissioner for 3 
years, and one Water Commissioner for 1 year, (to 
fill vacancy) ; one Sinking Fund Committee for 3 years 
(to fill vacancy) ;one Sinking Fund Commissioner for 
1 year, (to fill vacancy) ;one Trustee Public Library for 
3 years, and one Trustee Public Library for 1 year, 



(to fill vacancy); Auditor; Tree Warden; Elector un- 
der the Will of Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; six Con- 
stables; Hampshire County Farm Bureau Director; 
and to vote on the question — "Yes" or "No" — Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in this town? All the foregoing to be voted for on one 
ballot. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, and be kept open at least four hours, and for 
as much longer time as a majority of the voters pre- 
sent shall direct, but in no case shall they be kept open 
after the hour of sunset. 

Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various town 
officers and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5 — To take action in relation to main- 
tenance and repairs of highways and bridges the en- 
suing year, and raise and appropriate money for the 
same. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising 
money and appropriating same to defray the neces- 
sary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8 — To take action in relation to support 
of the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and ap- 
propriate money for the same. 

Article 9 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 



Article 10 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for care of cemeteries for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will raise and ap 
propriate money for the Public Library for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Article 12 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will vote to au- 
thorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Se- 
lectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the re- 
venue of the current financial year. 

Article 14 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for the employment of one or 
more School Physicians, in accordance with the provi- 
sions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hat- 
field children attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 16 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for supplies and maintenance of the 
Fire Department. 

Article 17— To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for Tree Warden and Brown 
Tail Moth Work. 

Article 18 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hat- 
field Pupils in Smith Academy, who are of suitable 
age and attainments to attend High School. 



Article 19 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate $150 for the support of the Hampshire 
County Farm Bureau, and elect a Director of that or- 
ganization who will be the official town representa- 
tive for the board of trustees, as per Chapter 273, 
Acts of 1918. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will vote to accept 
the HONOE EOLL built and erected by subscription 
— said memorial to our soldier boys to be maintained 
and kept "ever bright" in memory of their sacrifices 
in this world war. 

Article 21 — To see if the town wants to celebrate 
its 250th Anniversary in 1920, and will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for same. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to con- 
tinue its plan of building cement walks "around 
square," so-called, and raise and appropriate the sum 
of $1,000, to be expended from Academy Corner 
southerly. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield:— 

In accordance with the requirements of the 
Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for 
the year ending December 31st, 1918, is respectfully 
submitted. 

STATE AID 

State Aid paid to two persons, $144.00 

SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 

C. A. Byrne 50.00 

TUITION SMITH ACADEMY 

V. H. Keller, treas. 1,000.00 

SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Tuition 256.94 

POOR EXPENDITURES 



C. A. Byrne 


12.00 


J. F. Moore, Supplies 


3.75 


Dickinson HosjDital 


4.50 


J. H. Quinn, Burial 


27.00 


City of Northampton 


427.00 


Michael Yonsec 


100.00 


Town of Eastliampton 


161.55 


Hampshire County Sanitorium 


231.37 



$967.17 



11 
CONTINGENCIES 

C. A. Byrne, fumigating 27.50 

H. L. Pellam, care Town Hall and clock 96.25 

Watt Electric Co-, bulbs 2.00 

Herald Job Print, town reports and ptg., 232.00 

Geo. Eberlein, rep. 2.00 

W. T. Fitzgibbons, plumbing 1,90 

King Graves, del. town reports 7.05 

F. E. Davis, watches 134.50 

Amherst Gas Co., lights 25.17 

J. S. Bardwell, wood Town Hall 41.17 

Supernault & Eberlein, rep. Town Hall 27.94 

The Ray Co., Detective work 151-1.3 

John J. Kozash, trans, poor 21.00 

S. F. Billings, trans poor 9.36 

C. H. Chase, transfers 8.70 

H. S. Gere & Sons, Adv. 3.40 

Central City Chemical Co., Fumigators 30.16 

P. E. Mullany, stamped envelopes 15.80 
Wm. P Boyle, Rep. Town Hall and River station 9.10 

F. T. Bardwell, sawing wood 6.00 

H. Crosby, Placards 1.00 

Todd Check Co., Protectograph 39.20 

R. J. Richards, watches 25.00 

Warren & Watts, bulbs 5.40 

F. J. Lizotte, Band 78.72 

Johnson's Bookstore, Tax book 1.58 

W. & L. E. Gurley, sealers' supplies 2.56 

Wm. H. Dickinson, printing and flags 27. 93 

E. L. Graves, Wilkie plot 3.00 
L. H. Kingsley, serving selectmen's warrant 15.00 



12 

L. H. Kingsley, recording births, marriages 

and deaths, 48.20 

L. H. Kingsley, fares tel„ supplies, etc. 24.00 



1,123.72 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 

Clinton J. Iii chards, services as Supt. 502.33 

Theodore W -King, services as Supt. 36000 

Mary L. Allaire, services as principal 841.20 

Theresa Nolan, teaching 440.00 

Margaret L. Claire, teaching 279.00 

Eegina M. Fortch, teaching 482.00 

Laura F. Jubenville, teaching 472 JO 

Hazel Powers, teaching 482.00 

Mary C. Leary, teaching 548.00 

John F. Horgan, teaching 224.00 

Irene I. Devine, teaching 482.00 

Helen C. Harrington, teaching 256.00 

Margaret M Healey, teaching 256.00 

Mary B Woods, teaching 309.60 

Nellie E. Salvas, teaching 505.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, teaching 484.00 

Mary B. Powers teaching , 582.00 

Harriet P. Thomas, teaching 52.00 

Lena H. Proulx, teaching 570.80 

Constance C. ^reor, teaching 392.20 

Mildred I. Pease, teaching 467.20 

Marion C. Billings, teaching 114.80 

Grace W. Bardwell, teaching 78.6f 

Bertha E. Montague, teaching 1950 

Margaret P. Eyan, teaching 79.40 

Amelia Goold, teaching 20.00 

Dorothy A. Lynch, teaching 169.50 

Jessie O. McGregor, teaching 226.00 



13 



Margaret O'Donnell, teaching 


206.00 


Julia E. Lawless, teaching 


206.00 


Harriet P. Thomas, teaching 


26.00 


Maude E. Boyle, music 


J285.00 


Becla Bjurman, drawing 


115.00 


Anna L. Kilmurry, writing 


12.30 


A. F. Lovering, B. Inspect- 


2.00 


Bernace N. Cutter,census 


18.00 


Teachers' Betirement Board rjension 


495.30 


John F. O'Dea, janitor 


653.97 


E. V. Slattery, janitor 


113.00 


Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor 


105.00 


Kate Flynn, janitor . 


128.00 


John Salvas, janitor 


129.65 


Arthur Godin, janitor 


270.00 


James P. Kelly, janitor 


10.00 


Geo. D. Kingsley, janitor 


2000 


Joseph Sadoski, janitor 


12.00 


Pauline Andrews, teaching 


10.00 


N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co. 


38.20 


Conn. Valley St. By. Co., tickets 


149.19 


W. N.' Potter Sons & Co., Coal 


210.86 


H. W Wolfram, coal 


446.43 


H. D. Smith, coal 


813.64 


Kietan JSackiel, wood 


117.00 


John J. Betsold, wood 


60.00 


F. T. Bardweli, wood 


18.00 


J. S. Bardweli, wood 


43.50 


Ernest Godin, saw wood 


7.50 


Amherst Gas Co. 


14.81 


W. T. Fitzgibbons, rep. 


111.61 


Supernault & Eberlein, rep- 


4.95 


F. L. Woodruff,rep. 


28.88 


Wm. P. Boyle, rep. 


154.08 


D. P. Sheehan, drawing coal 


30.00 



14 



J. F. Powers, rep. 


51.02 


W. H. Riley & Co., rep. 


4.82 


John F Small, lab. 


8.00 


D. Appleton & Co., books 


33.01 


Clarence Hawkes, books 


8.55 


A. S. Barnes Co., books 


2.22 


E. E. Babb & Co., books 


<2.83 


F. M. Crittenden, ptg 


3.75 


D. C. Heath & Co., books 


5.88 


Am. Book Co •, books 


1.38 


Educational Pub. Co. 


48 


C. N. Fitts 


3.00 


J. L. Hammett Co., books 


143.92 


Mary B. Woods, trans. 


4.80 


Wm. S. Murphy, trans. 


30.50 


Merrick Lumber Co. 


7.10 


Consolidated Dry Goods Co. 


600 


0. Belden & Sons 


15.00 


F. Gr. Howard, Sup. 


12.82 


John F. O'Dea Com. and Labor 


59.50 


0. E. Belden, Com. 


20.00 


A. J. Smith, Com. 


20.00 



$15,206.04 

CARE OF CEMETERIES 

F. H Bardwell, Treas., 100.00 

TOWN OFFICERS 

John McHugh, services as elector 10.00 

C. I. Stowell, ballot clerk 6.00 

H. L. Howard, ballot clerk 3.00 

Robt. J. McGrath, ballot clerk 6.00 

Patrick R. Brennan, ballot clerk 3.00 



15 

Joseph E. Godin, ballot clerk 6.00 

D. E. Holley, ballot clerk 3.00 
C. E. Warner, Auditor 2000 
L. A. Deinlein, services as selectman 1917 75.00 
J. W. Kiley, services as selectman 1917 75.00 
J. L. Day, services as selectman 1917 150.00 

E. L. Graves, balance of salary as collector 1916 175.00 
E. L. Graves, part of salary as collector 1917 100.00 
Geo. Eberlein, Police 8.45 
E. W. Strong, assessor 30.00 
C. E. Lovett, assessor 30.00 
L. H. Kingsley, assessor 257.50 
R. W. Weber, registrar of voters 15.00 
L. A. Billings, registrar of voters 15.00 
Thos. W. Ryan, register of voters 15.00 
L. H. Kingsley, registrar of voters 15-00 
R. F. Wells, Sealer of weights and measures 100.00 
Fred Wenzel, police 3.50 
L, H. Kingsley, town clerk and clerk board se- 
lectmen 500.00 

L. H. Kingsley, town treasurer 150.00 



1,771.45 

STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Co. $3,552.65 

ORDINARY REPAIRS— HIGHWAYS AND 
BRIDGES 

J. S. Bardwell, services supt., team and labor 561.29 

D. P Sheehan, team and labor 186.40 

Alex Donnis, team and labor 6.00 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 164. t >0 

John J. Breor, team and labor 593.24 



16 

John T. Powers, team and labor 517.99 

B. Fralick, team and labor 39.35 

Archie P. Graves, team and labor 12.07 

John C. Ryan, team and labor 82.35 

John J. Betsold, team and labor 8.75 

A. H. Strong, team and labor 21.00 

F- P. Jones, team and labor 49.0C 

Belden Bros, team and labor 28.00 

W. H. Dickinson, team and labor 34.90 

James L. Boyle, team and labor 12.00 

E. A. Ryan, team and labor 31.90 

Geo. P. Englehardt, labor 1.80 

J. W. Kiley, labor 1.00 

Lawrence Waskiewicz, labor 1.50 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor 256.46 

George Bak, labor 38.52 

Jacob Geis, labor 260-02 

Frank Kruliski, labor 74.56 

David Omasta, labor 7.03 

Wm. Gowash, labor 34.84 

Jacob Dubiel, labor 143.51 

Mike Kominski 16.50 

Alex Burda, labor 12.00 

Alex Kozask, labor 76.00 

Stefan Jradoski, labor 2.75 

Paul E. Balise, labor 3.50 

Joseph Dwzak, labor 2.75 

George Eberlein, repairs 11.65 

Wm. T. Fitzgibbons, repairs 8.19 

E. N. Dickinson, gravel 17.00 

X. E Metal Culvert Co. 9.00 

J. T. Fitzgibbons, sand 16.96 

L. H. Kingsley, sand 5.60 

Chas. E. Pfieffer, labor 5.75 

Kietan Backiel, care of common 40.00 



17 



Fc 


>ster-Farrar Co., supplies 


9.95 


F. 


G. Howard, supplies 


19.75 


B€ 


srlin Construction Co,, rep. bridge 


412.14 


W 


. H Riley & Co. 


1.00 


Bi 


•ownell & Dickinson, sup. 


4.80 


M< 


srrick Lumber Co., lumber 


8.29 


W 


. F. Bissell, oil 


4.50 


F. 


A. Bartlett, plank 


221.91 




$4,078.35 




BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 




H. 


L. Howard, bond for Treasurer 


$40.00 


H. 


L. Howard, bond for Treas. W. Com. 


8-00 


H. 


L. Howard, bond for Tax Collector 


50.00 



MEMORIAL DAY 



$98.00 



J. W. Heffernan, flags $14.59 

C. K. Morton 56.00 



$70.59 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Ellen A. "Waite, salary 187.10 

U. G. Dehey, assistant 25-80 

Carrie C. Cutter, care of dist and mag. 25.00 

Anna Bukoski, cleaning 2.50 

H. R. Huntting Co., books 76.31 

Arthur R. Womrath, books 25.40 

J. W. Heffernan, books | 11.05 

Bridgman & Lyman, books 86.60 

J. L. Hammett Co., books 14.81 



18 

Gazette Printing Co-, printing 4.25 

Gaylord Bros., books 16.90 

Johnson's Bookstore, books 4.67 

Kingsbury Box Co., cards 1.50 

S. R. Carter, Electric Heater 7.50 

Library Bureau 1.44 

Hampshire Bookshop, books 8.75 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



->=> 



$499.58 



H. L. Pellam, Market fire 5.00 

John McIIugh, Market fire 2.00 

John F. O'Dea, Market fire 2.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson 2.00 

Dennis Whalen 2200 

Paul E. Balise 18.45 

Wm. H. Ormond, Postoffice fire 5.00 

Kietan Backiel, Postoffice fire 10.00 

J. F. O'Dea, 16.00 

Northampton Fire Dept. 50.00 

M. J. Ryan, fire chief 100.00 

Fred Wentzel, hose wagon and labor 11.00 

J. J. Betsold, hose wagon 5.00 

Thomas M. O'Dea, hose wagon 5.00 

H W. Marsh, hose wagon 5.00 

Mrs. James Mullins, hose wagon 5.00 

C. H. Crafts, hose waeon 5.00 



$268.45 



19 
CARE OF MEMORIAL HALL 

J. S. Bardwell, wood 40.50 

E. Godin, sawing wood 7.50 

H. W. Wolfram, coal 47.91 

J. B. Bitner, repairs 14.15 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor 75.00 



$185-06 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS AND SLAUGHTER- 
ING 

E. S. Warner 198.00 

Fred T. Bardwell 161.20 



$359.20 
TREE WARDEN 



P. J. Whalen, old bill 


$57.50 


Geo. M. Franklin 


1.55 


Jacob Geis 


1.55 


J. S. Bardwell 


6.40 


» . 


$67.00 


Hampshire County Farm Bureau 


100.00 


INSURANCE 




H. L. Howard 


$80-40 



20 
REPAIRS— STONE ROADS 

J. S. Bardwell, services as supt., team and labor 336.51 

John J. Breor, team and labor 146.62 

John T. Powers, team and labor 257.84 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 28.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, 28.00 

H. L, Stoddard, labor 45.50 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor 73.94 

Jacob Geis, labor 12011 

Jacob Dnbiel, labor 58.95 

George Bak, labor 8.25 

Joseph Kozash, labor 17.12 

J. C. Ryan, labor 17.12 

H. D. Smith, coal 13.63 

Boston & Maine Rd., freight 34.70 

J. S. Lane & Son, stone 228.40 

City of Northampton, stone 46.34 

A. T. Miller, coal 11.22 



$1,472.25 



OILING STONE ROADS 

J. S. Bardwell, services as supt., team and labor 28.84 

John J. Breor, team and labor 17.50 

John T. Powers, team and labor 49.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team and labor 58.36 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 21.00 

E. A. Ryan, team and labor 54.53 

Polish labors, sanding 58.74 

Jacob Dubiel, labor 19.91 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor 22.66 

Jacob Geis, labor 22.66 

Geo Bak 19.91 



21 

Boston & Maine, oil freight 236.87 

The Barrett Co., oil 2,075.01 

Boston & Maine, demurrage 12.36 



$2,697.40 

BRIDGES AND SPECIAL REPAIRS 

J. S. Bardwell, services as supt, team and labor 119 J 2 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 4.00 

J. T. Powers, team and labor 233.38 

John J. Breor, team and labor 77.02 

John C. Ryan, team and labor 43.00 

Win. H. Dickinson, team and labor 15-68 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor 26.00 

Ceo. M. Franklin, labor 91.66 

Jacob Geis, labor 34.49 

Jacob Dubiel, labor 52.25 

John Petcen, labor 8.25 

Alex Bak, labor - 7.00 

Michael Duleski, labor 8.68 

J. B. Bitner, repairs 4.75 

W. P. Boyle, painting bridges 178.50 

F. A- Bartlett, bridge lumber 19,36 

L. W. Clapp & Sons, lumber 118.35 

E. E. Davis, advice on bridges 15.00 

New Eng. Metal Culvert Co. 203.00 

Merrick Lumber Co. 32.82 



$1,292.31 
RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN— 1918 

State Aid $144.00 

School Physician 50,00 

Smith Academy 1,000.00 



22 



Smith Agl. School 




256.94 


Care of Poor 




967.17 


Contingencies 




1,123.72 


Schools 




15,206 04 


Care of Cemeteries 




100.00 


Town Officers 




1,771.45 


Street Lights 




3,552.65 


Ordinary Repairs 




4,078.35 


Bonds, Town Officers 




98.00 


Memorial Day 




70.59 


Public Library 




499.58 


Fire Dept. 




268.45 


Memorial Building 




185.06 


Inspection of Animals 




359.20 


Tree Warden 




67.00 


Hamp. Co. Farm Bureau 


100.00 


Insurance 




80.40 


Repairs, Stone goads 




1,472.25 


Oiling Roads 




2,697.40 


Bridges and Repairs 




1,292.31 


Total 


$35,440.56 


Respectfully submitted, 




J W 


. KILEY, 




S. F. 


BILLINGS, 




Wm. 


H. DICKINSON, 






(Selectmen of Hatfield. 



I have this day examined the books of the Se- 
lectmen and find them correct. 

Jan. 7, 1919. CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



23 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT- 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD,— 1019 



Name 

Balise, Paul 
Boyle, Michael W. 
Bar dwell, Frederick H. 
Billings, Samuel F. 
Belden, Oscar E. 
Belden, William L. 
Crafts, Carlton H. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Dickinson, William H. 
Day, John H. 
Donovan, Peter J. 
Fitzgerald, Richard F. 
Godin, Joseph E. 
LaMountain, Mac L. 
Marsh, Harry W. 
McHugh, John 
Nolan, Thomas A. 
Jones, Frank P. 
Proulx, Leon R. 
Powers, Lawrence A. 
Ryan, Edward A. 
Ryan, Matthew J. 
Slattery, Charles F. 
Sheehan, Daniel P. 
Strong, Edson W. 
Wight, Leland H. 
Whalen, Dennis 



Occupation 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 



Treasurers Report 



L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield 

Dr. 

To balance in Treasury, $ 7,942.27 

To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll. 



(1916 Taxes) 


2,031.54 


To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll. 




(1917 Taxes) 


13,019.15 


To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll. 




(1918 Taxes) 


28,107.76 


Treas. Water Commissioners 


2,900.00 


Dist. Court Fines, 


46.00 


Slaughter Licenses, 


7.00 


Pool Licenses, 


7.50 


Licenses — Junk, Fruit and State, 


88.00 


Sealer's Receipts, 


55.76 


Rent of Town Hall, 


140.00 


L. A. Powers, tile and lab. 


24.48 


George Eberlein, sale of coal, 


22.12 


Nicholas Staszko, sale of grass, 


10.00 


Eugene Jubenville, sale of grass, 


6.00 


Hugh McLeod, lab. 


18.27 


Porter Mch Works, lab. 


245.57 



25 



J. E. Porter, lab. 103.88 

J. J. O'Malley, lab. 3.90 

Fred J. Jubenville, lab. 25.0C 

> J. S. Bard well, sale of loam, 12.50 

Myron Kulesza, sale of loam, 16 50 

Michael Yoniec est. 50.00 

P. R. Mullany, rent, 10.00 

S. M. Bourdon, filling and lab. 44.50 

Victory Parade Committee, i.S>2 

C. J. Richards, sup. sold, 8.75 

John F. O'Dea, tickets sold, 150.63 

John F. O'Dea, rent of school bldg. 120.00 

City of Northampton, tuition, 84.00 

Town of Whately, tuition, 162,49 

State-^Income Mass. School Fund, 790.98 

School— Supt. Union 625.00 

Hy. Corns, bal. Pine Bridge Road, 836.12 

Income Tax, 2,160.00 

Subsidy — Consumptives, 96 43 

Smith Ind. School, tuition, 236.86 

Trans, of Paupers, 2.5* 

Inspection of Animals, 95.75 

Corporation Tax, 281.42 

National Bank Tax, 786.24 

State Aid, 162.00 

County Treas. — Dog fund, 76.21 

No. Natl Bank, int, on dep. 11L71 

To cash rec'd from Temporary Loans. 
C. D. Parker & Co. Inc. $14,167.50 

S. N. Bond & Co. 9,731.50 

S. N. Bond & Co. 9,828.11 



j.*fe 



$33,727.11 
$95,453.50 



26 




Cr. 




By cash paid Selectmen's orders 


$35,410.56 


Interest on Water Bonds 


2,000.00 


District Court Fees, 


90.37 


Bureau of Statistics, 


10.00 


Soldiers' Exemption charge, 


13.01 


Interest on temporary loans, 


843.83 


County Tax, 


5,839.13 


State Tax, 


4,950.00 


State Tax, — Repairs Highways, 


708.00 


Treasurer Sinking Fund, 


900.00 


Balance in Treasury, 


6,263.60 



By cash paid outstanding Notes. 

Northampton Natl Band, Note No. 45, 10,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co. Note No. 46, 5,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co. Note No. 47, 5,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co. Note No. 48, 5,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co. Note No. 52, 10,000.00 

5th Note and Int.— New Schoolhouse, 3,395.00 

$95,453.50 



27 
IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1916 Taxes) 
Dr. 

To cash received, 2,031.54 

Assessors' orders of Abate 's, 90.36 2,121.90 

Cr. 

By uncollected Taxes, 1,860.56 

Addition to Warrant, 82.00 

Interest collected, 179.34 2,121.90 

(1917 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received, 13,019.15 

Assessors' orders of Abate 's, 16.70 

Uncollected Taxes, 2,130.85 15,166.70 

Cr. 

By uncollected Taxes, 14,879.88 

Interest collected, 286.82 15,166.70 

(1918 Taxes) 
Dr. 

To cash received, 28,107.76 

Uncollected Taxes, 17,918.35 46,026.11 

Cr. 

By Assessors' Warrant, 45,211.46 

Addition to Warrant, 784.65 

Interest collected, 30.00 46,026.11 



28 

I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collect- 
or, and find that he has been credited by the Trea- 
surer, with the amounts of $2,031.54 of the taxes of 
1916— $13,019.15 of the Taxes of 1917— and $28,107.- 
76 of the taxes of 1918. 

January -7th, 1919. CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



WATER SINKING FUND 

To thirty years four per cent Water Bonds, $50,000.00 
By Sinking Fund, 28,045.65 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

To outstanding Notes. 

Note No. 49, due Feb. 21, 1919, $5,000.00 

Note No. 50, due Feb. 21, 1919, 7,000.00 

Note No. 51, due Feb. 21, 1919, 3,000.00 

Note No. 53, due Apr. 5, 1919, 10,000.00 



$25,000.00 



Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, (1917) 2,130.85 

Uncollected taxes, (1918) 17,918.35 

Due from State Aid, 144.00 

State— Smith School, 128.47 



29 

Bills due, 286.28 

Balance in Treasury, 6,263.60 $26,871.55 



Balance in favor of the Town, $1,871.55 

L. H. KING&LEY, Treasurer. 



I have examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the town of Hatfield for the year ending 
December 31st, 1918, and find them correct. I find 
Selectmen's orders on file to the amount of Thirty- 
five thousand, four hundred forty dollars, and fifty- 
six cents, — ($35,440.56) — with evidence of their pay- 
ment by him, also, cancelled notes and receipts for 
County and State Taxes, and interest paid, 

I find a balance in the Treasury of Six thousand, 
two hundred sixty-three dollars and sixty cents, — 
($6,263.60) 

January 7th, 1919. CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



Report of Sinking Fund Commissioners 



We have the following amounts deposited to the 
credit of the Sinking Fund: 

Haydenville Savings Bank $1,562.91 

Easthampton Savings Bank 1,405.79 

Florence Savings Bank 1,493.55 

Nonotuck Savings Bank 982.11 

Northampton Ins. for Savings 1,245.48 

Union Trust Co. Springfield 2,675.88 

Springfield Ins. for Savings 1,217.13 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank 1,235.62 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Holyoke 927.18 

Springfield St. Railway, Bond 1,000.00 

Boston & Maine R. R. Co. Bond 3,000.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co., Bond 2,000.00 

U. S. Liberty Bond 2,000.00 

Town of Hatfield Water ,Bond 7,000.00 

B. & M. R, R. Coupons 300.00 



$28,045.65 



M. J. RYAN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 



I have this day examined the vouchers and se- 
curities of the Sinking Fund Commissioners and find 
them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



Water Commissioners Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the 
twenty-third annual report of the Board of Water 
Commissioners : 

We have received the past year as follows : — 

Bal, of cash on hand from last years' acct., $4,242.30 

Cash from collection of Water Rates, 5,089.20 

Interest on Certificates of Deposits, 142.57 



$9,474.07 



We have paid the past year as follows: 

Town of Hatfield, (from water 

rates) 2,900.00 

Salaries Water Commissioners, 100.00 

Seth W. Kingsley, for labor, 13.95 

F. M. Crittenden, printing, 10.00 

M. C. Bailey, pine and mill work, 4.67 

Norwood Eng. Co., sup. 68.00 

Joseph F. Chandler, lab. and sup. 18.10 

W. H. Riley & Co. lead connections, 94.80 

E. W. Strong, coll. water rates, lab. 

and cash paid 337.20 



32 

E. E. Davis, surveying and maps, 183.80 

Leslie W. Swift, land, 116.50 

Joseph Sacloski, land, 609.00 

James B. Coffey, land, 333.00 

Cora H. Warner, land, 1,457.00 

George A. Billings, land, 265.00 

Edw. L. Shaw, deeds, 15.00 



6,526.02 



Balance in Treasury, 

One Liberty Bond, 1,000.00 

Certificate of Deposit — First Nat'l 

Bk.. 1,800.00 

Cash on deposit, 148.05 



:■*-;** 



$9,474.07 



Compelled by the State Board, of Health, and 
fears of the water consumers of clanger of contamina- 
tion of the town's water system, your Commissioners 
have purchased some seven different tracts of land 
lying contiguous to and at the source of Eunning 
Gutter Brook, an area of 41.16 acres, at a total ex- 
pense of $2,979.30. A map showing exact locations 
can be seen on file in the Town Clerk's office. 

While, no doubt, this property could have been 
purchased for a less figure previous to the farming 



33 

activity in this region, (considering the cupidity of 
human nature) your Commissioners feel they have 
clone fairly well. 

JOHN W. KILEY, 

MICHAEL J. PROULX, 

Water Commissioners. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts 
of the Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the 
Town of Hatfield and find them correct, with vouch- 
ers on file for all payments made, and a balance in 
the Treasury of $2,948.05. 

January 7th, 1919. CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for 
the vear 1918 are as follows: — 



BIRTHS BY MONTHS 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



No. 


Males 


Females 


12 


6 


6 


9 


3 


6 


9 


5 


4 


11 


3 


8 


4 


2 


2 


8 


5 


3 


7 


2 


5 


7 


4 


3 


5 


1 


4 


5 


3 


2 


8 


2 


6 


5 


2 


3 



90 38 

BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 



Born in United States 

Born in Poland 

Born in Austro-Hungary 



52 



father 


Mother 


15 


16 


63 


62 


12 


12 



&SSO&+ 



90 



90 



35 
BIRTHS FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


81 


93 


92 


122 


101 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

January 2 

February 

March 

April 1 

May 3 

June 

July 2 

August 1 

September 2 

October 1 

November 

December 2 

14 

First marriage of both parties, 11. 

Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 2. 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 48 and 18 
years of age, respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 36 and 16 
years of age respectively. 



36 



BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 





Groom 


Bride 


Born in the United States 


8 


6 


Born in Poland 


6 


7 


Born in Ireland 





1 



14 



14 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



1913 
26 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



1914 
33 



1915 

38 



1916 
29 



DEATHS BY MONTHS 



No. 

5 
3 

3 
3 




1 

5 
3 

10 
6 
2 



1917 

28 



Males Females 
1 



41 



25 



16 



37 





No. 


Males ] 


females 


Under 1 year of age 


12 


8 


4 


Between 1 and 10 yrs. 


7 


6 


1 


Between 10 and 20 yrs. 


2 





2 


Between 20 and 30 yrs. 


7 


4 


>3 


Between 30 and 40 yrs. 


1 


1 





Between 40 and 50 yrs. 


4 


3 


1 


Between 50 and 60 yrs. 


3 


2 


1 


Between 60 and 70 yrs. 


4 


4 





Between 70 and 80 yrs. 


1 


1 






41 29 12 

Age of oldest person deceased (Male) 77 yrs. 8 mo. 

NAME OF PERSONS DECEASED 



John Marshall Strong- 
Michael Superba 
Joseph Murray 
Thomas Pitzgwald 
Charles S. Shattuck 
Michael Maechailesk 
Thomas J. Blniman 
Charles E. Lynch 
Michael Krul 
Frank H. Sweatland 
Gabelle Yoneic 
Matilda H. Winters 
Elinor Borowski 
Kate Novack 
Jadwega Kanpenskii 
Charles R, Slattery 
Marcus George Mullins 
Jacob Pianka 
Mary Kubosiak 



Michael Yoniec 
Michael Kubosiak 
Charles E. Lovett 
Helen McGrath 
Tofila Kubosiak 
Antoni Bielecki 
Elisha Hubbard 
Stella Rice Ziewicg 
Wladyslaw Bak 
Alex Koolas 
Jessie May Field 
Stanley Dubul 
Dorothy A. Lynch 
Joseph Lapenski 
Elbridge Kingsley 
Mary Jennie Graves 
Sophia Kiakoski 
Maria Louisa Graves 



38 

DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year end- 
ing November 30, 1918, with the receipts and settle- 
ments of the account with the Treasurer, is as follows : 
45 Male dogs at $2.00 each 90.00 

2 Female dogs at $5.00 each 10.00 



$100.00 
Less fees, 47 doss at 20 cents each 9.40 



Paid to County Treasurer $90.60 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Town Clerk. 



Assessor s Report 



Value of assessed Personal Estate 


$430,351 


Value of assessed Eeal Estate 


1,762,822 


Total value of assessed estate 


$2,193,173 


Value of assessed buildings 


943,454 


Value of assessed land 


819,368 




$1,762,822 


Number of polls assessed 


674 


Residents assessed on property 


420 


Non-Residents assessed on property 


77 


Number of persons assessed on property 


497 


For poll tax only 


373 


Rate of tax per $1,000 


$20.00 


Number of Horses assessed 


450 


Number of Cows assessed 


•251 


Number of Neat Cattle 


19 


Number of Fowls 


160 


Number of Dwelling Houses 


408 


Acres of land 


9,246 


State Tax 


$4,950.00 


State Highway Tax 


708.00 


County Tax 


5,839.13 


Town Tax 


33,070.10 


Overlayings 


644.23 



$45,211.46 



40 

Estimated Bank and Corporation Tax 1,200.00 

State Income Tax 2,097.90 

Excise Tax 744.45 

Addition to Warrant 30.20 

Value of property exempt from taxation under 
Chapter 409, Acts of 1909:- 

Literary Institutions 72,319 

Church Property 31,700 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDSOX W. STRONG, 

CHARLES E. LOVETT, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



Report of Library Trustees 



After Eev. Irving A. Flint, chairman of the board, 
left town the remaining trustees reorganized with E. 
F. Wells as chairman and Mrs. David Mnllany as Sec- 
retary. 

Miss Ellen A. Waite, whose term as librarian ex- 
pired Dec. 31, 1918, has been re-elected. Her report, 
covering in detail the work of the library during the 
past year, is herewith submitted. 

E. F. WELLS, j 

MRS. DAVID MULLANY, 

■Library Trustees. 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Hatfield Public Library: 

During the year 1918, 255 books have been pur- 
chased for the Library, 117 for adults and 138 for the 
juvenile department. 

The circulation in the juvenile department has 
been 3331; for the adults 3077, making a total circula- 
tion of 6,408 as compared with 6,411 last year. The 
slight decrease being due to the closing of the library 
during the greater part of February on account of t, 
scarcity of coal, and during the whole of October on 
account of the epidemic of influenza, The circulation 
for December was 813. 

The twenty-five books in the Polish language 
loaned by the Massachusetts Library Association in 
1917 were returned and replaced by twenty-six new 
ones. 

A case of books and charts on Birds for the use 
of the children of the public schools has been loaned 
to the library by the Massachusetts Audubon Society 
and can be kept until July. 

Last spring over two hundred books contributed 
by the people of Hatfield were sent through the library 
to the soldiers' camps. 

Through the kindness of Miss Laura Belden of 
Bradstreet, Miss Carrie Cutter of West Hatfield and 



43 

Mr. G. H. Danforth of North Hatfield books from the 
library have been circulated in those districts. 

The library is open on Tuesdays from 3 to 5 P, 
M. and Saturdays from 3 to 5 P. M. and from 7 to 9 
P. M. 

Mrs. Ula Dehey assists Saturday evenings. 

ELLEN A. WAITE, Librarian. 



BOOKS PURCHASED FOR THE LIBRARY 
DURING 1918 

Fiction 

Our Square and the People in it. 

Sam'l Hopkins Adams 
Little Miss Grouch Sam'l Hopkins Adams 

My Country George Rothwell Brown 

The Sword Hand of Napoleon Cyrus Brady 

The Second Fiddle Phyllis Bottome 

The Lure of the North Harold Bindloss 

The Gossip Shop J. E. Buckrose 

Love in a Little Town J. E. Buckrose 

Minniglen Agnes and Egerton Castle 

Understood Betsey Dorothy Canfield 

Drusilla with a Million Elizabeth Cooper 

The Lost Naval Papers Bennet Copplestone 

Routledge Rides Alone Will Levington Comfort 

The Triumph of John Kars Ridgwell Cullum 

Buttered Side Down Edna Ferber 

Our Admirable Betty Jeffery Farnol 

The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come John Fox, Jr. 
The Trail of the Lonesome Pine John Fox, Jr. 



44 



A Knight of the Cumberland 

The Golden Lamp 

Little Sir Galahad 

Betty Zane 

Jan and Her Job 

Making Her His Wife 

Finished 

Allan and the Golden Flower 

The Man Next Door 

Clipped Wings 

The Hidden Spring 

Shavings 

Cap'n Dan's Daughter 

The Rough Road 

The Morals of Marcus Ordeyne 

The Enchanted 3am 

Branded 

The Call of the Wild 

The Little Lady of the Big House 

The Green Jacket 

Good Old Anna 

Pieces of Eight 

Come Out of the Kitchen 

Sonia, Between Two Worlds 

Ninety-six Hours Leave 

The Indian Drum 

The Graf tons 

Tillie, the Mennonite Maid 

Maggie of Virginsburg 

Hearts and Masks 

Josselyn's Wife 

The Story of Julia Page 

The Chosen People 

Mr. Grex of Monte Carlo 

The Hillman 



John Fox, Jr. 

Phoebe Gray 

Phoebe Gray 

Zane Grey 

Mrs. A. L. Harker 

Cora Harris 

Rider Haggard 

Rider Haggard 

Emerson Hough 

Rupert Hughes 

Clarence Kelland 

Joseph Lincoln 

Joseph Lincoln 

William J. Locke 

William J. Locke 

Grace L. H. Lutz 

Francis Lynde 

Jack London 

Jack London 

Jennette Lee 

Mrs. Belloc Lowndes 

Richard LeGallienne 

Alice Duer Miller 

Stephen McKenna 

Stephen McKenna 

MacHarg and Balmer 

Archibald Marshall 

Helen R. Martin 

Helen R. Martin 

Harold MacGrath 

Kathleen Norris 

Kathleen Norris 

Sidney L. Nyberg 

E. P. Oppenheim 

E. P. Oppenheim 



45 



An Amiable Charlatan 

The Pawns Count 

Suspense 

Oh, Money, Money 

A Daughter of the Land 

The Wire Devils 

Adventures of Jimniie Dale 

The Star in the Window 

Bobbie, General Manager 

The Call of the Offshore Wind 

One Year- of Pierrot 

The New Mr. Howerson 

The Sheriff's Son 

His Official Fiance 

An Amazing Interlude 

The Yukon Trail 

With Juliet in England 

A Daughter of Jehu 

The Long Lanes Turning 

North of Fifty Three 

The Primrose Ring 

The Magnificent Amber sons 

The Earthquake 

Bie- Tremaine 



E. P. Oppenheim 

E, P. Oppenheim 

Isabel Ostrander 

Eleanor Porter 

Gene Stratton Porter 

Frank L. Packard 

Frank L. Packard 

Alice Higgins Pronty 

Alice Higgins Prouty 

Ralph D. Paine 

Opie Read 

Wm. McL. Raiue 

Pert a Ruck 

Mary Roberts Rinehart 

Wm. MacLeod Raine 

Grace S. Richmond 

Laura E. Richards 

Hallie Erminie Rives 

Bertrand W. Sinclair 

Ruth Sawyer 

Booth Tarkington 

Arthur Train 

Marie Van Vorst 

Grace Miller White 

Mary Heaton Vorse 



Tess of the Storm Country 

The Prestons 

The Secret of the Storm Country Grace Miller White 

The Unwilling Yestal Edward Lucas White 

Elizabeth's Campaign Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

The Martial Adventures of Henry and Me 

Wm. Allen White 
Out of the Silences Mary E. Walker 



46 

Books on the War 

The Land of Deepening Shadow D. T. Curtin 

Carry On Coningsby Dawson 

Out to Win Coningsby Dawson 

Inside the Russian Revolution Rheta C. Dorr 

A Village in Picardy Ruth Gaines 
A Treasury of War Poetry 

Face to Face With Kaiserism James W. Gerard 

The Kaiser as I Knew Him A. N. Davis 

A Minstrel in France Harry Lauder 

The Eyes of Asia Rudyard Kipling 

My Home on the Field of Mercy F. W. Huard 

Outwitting the Hun Lieut. Pat O'Brien 

Private Peat Harold R. Peat 

Over the Top (2d copy) Arthur Guy Empey 

The Whistling Mother Grace S. Richmond 
Short Rations Madeleine Zabruskie Doty 

Adventures of Arnold Adair Lawrence L. Driggs 

The Son Decides Arthur S. Pier 
The Salt of the Earth Mrs. Alfred Sidgwiek 

Over There With the Australians Knyvett 

A Yankee in the Trenches R. Derby Holmes 

With Serbia Into Exile Fortier Jones 

Miscellaneous 

From Shakespeare to 0. Henry S. P. B. Mais 

Up From Slavery Booker T. Washington 

Abigail Adams Laura E. Richards 

Old Homes of New Americans Francis E. Clark 

With Immigrants to America Stephen Graham 

With Carrington on the Bozeman Road Hanson 
The Standard Bearers Katherine Mays 

Poetical Works of Alfred Tennyson 
Poetical Works of Henry W. Longfellow 



47 

Poetical Works of William Wordsworth 
Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier 

Juvenile Department 

Little Women Louisa M. Alcott 

Isabel Carlton's Friends Margaret Ashmun 

Boy Scout Crusoes Edwin C. Burritt 

The Spanish Chest Edna A. Brown 

Jack Straw, Lighthouse Builder Irving Crump 

Polly of the Hospital Emma C. Dowd 

Polly of the Lady Gray Cottage Emma C. Dowd 

The Warning Girls Ellen Douglas Deland 

Boy Scouts of the Wild Cat Patrol Walter P. Eaton 
Wideawake Girls Katharine Ruth Ellis 

Wide Awake Girls in Winsted Katherine Ruth Ellis 
Wide Awake Girls at College Katharine Ruth Ellis 
Tom Slade Boy Scout Percy K. Fitzhugh 

Tom Slade at Temple Camp Percy K. Fitzhugh 

Tom Slade on a Transport Percy K. Fitzhugh 

Tom Slade With the Colors Percy K. Fitzhugh 

Tom Slade With the Bbys Over There 

Percy K. Fitzhugh 
Helen-Over-the-Wall Beth B. Gilchrist 

The Short Stop Zane Grey 

Sandy Himself Gardner Hunting 

The Boy Electricians as Detectives E. J. Houston 

Bartley, Freshman Pitcher William Heyliger 

A Texas Blue Bonnet Caroline E. Jacobs 

Captain Polly of Annapolis Gabrielle Jackson 

The Lost Little Lady E. B. and A. A. Knipe 

The Lucky Sixpence E. B. and A. A. Knipe 

Peg o'the Ring E. B. and A. A. Knipe 

Beatrice of Denewood E. BL and A. A. Knipe 

Girls of '64 E. B. and A. A. Knipe 

Mark Tidd Clarence Kelland 



48 



The Silver Cache of the Pawnee 

Polly's Secret 

School Days of Elliot Gray 

The Dutch Twins 

The Japanese Twins 

The Belgian Twins 

The Mexican Twins 

The Eskimo Twins 

Sandy Sawyer, Sophomore 

The Stroke Oar 

From Tenderfoot to Scout 

Dandelion Cottage 

Bob Knights Diary on a Farm 



D. Lange 

Harriet A. Nash 

Colton Maynard 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Ralph D. Paine 

Ralph D. Paine 

A. C. Ruddy 

Carrol Watson Rankin 

Charlotte Smith 

Mary P. Wells Smith 



Boy Captive in Canada 

Young and Old Puritans of Hatfield 

Mary P. Wells Smith 



Three in Camp 
Five in a Ford 
Four on a Farm 
Their Canoe Trip 
Jolty Good Summer 
With Flintlock and Fife 



Maiy P. Wells Smith 
Mary P. Wells Smith 
Mary P. Wells Smith 
Mary P. Wells Smith 
Mary P. Wells Smith 
Everett Tomlinson 



Four Boys in the Land of Cotton Everett Tomlinson 

Grit A Plenty 

The Orcutt Girls 

The Varmint 

About Animals 

Boy Life of Napoleon 

Boys ' Book of Submarines 

Boys' Book of Scouts 

The Boy General 

Thomas A. Edison 



Dillon Wallace 

Charlotte M. Vaile 

Owen Johnson 

Bet old from St. Nicholas 

Brooks 

Frederick Collin* 

Percy K. Fitzhugh 

Elizabeth N. Custer 

Francis Rolt Wheeler 

Francis Rolt Wheeler 



Wonders of War in the Air 

Last of the Great Scouts, "Buffalo Bill" 

H. C. Whetmore and Zane Grey 



49 

Piers Plowman Histories, Books I, II, III and IV 
Little Busy Bodies J. Marks and J. Moody 

The Lion . Agnes Herbert 

In Texas With Davy Crockett E. McNeil 

Tommy Tinker's Book Mary Frances Blaisdell 

Bunny Rabbit's Diary Mary Frances Blaisdell 

Mother Westwind's "Where" Stories T. W. Burgess 
Adventures of Jimmy Skunk T. W. Burgess 

Adventures of Bobby Coon T. W. Burgess 

Barbara and the Five Little Purrs Elizabeth L. Gould 
Master Friskey's Heroism Clarence Hawkes 

Eugene Field Reader Alice S. Harris 

The Little House in the Woods Clara W. Hunt 

The Goody Naughty Book Sarah Cory Rippey 

The Sandman, His Songs and Rhymes 
Pictures and Stories 

Peter and Polly in Spring Rose Lucia 

The Tale of Peter Rabbit Beatrix Potter 

Nancy Rutledge Katharine Pyle 

Little Miss Grasshopper Johanna Spyri 

Jumping Joan and other Mother Goose Stories 
The Golden Goose and other Fairy Stories 

Eva M. Tappaxi 
Work-a-day Doings, 2 copies Emma Serl 

In Fable Land, 2 copies Emma Serl 

Beacon Primer, 2 copies 
Beacon First Reader, 2 copies 
Banbury Cross Stories, 2 copies 
Bender Primer, 2 copies 
Classic Folks, 2 copies 
Elson Runkel Primer, 2 copies 
Elson First Reader, 2 copies 
Easy Road Primer, 2 copies 
Easy Road First Reader, 2 copies 
Graded Poetry, Book I, 2 copies 



50 



Hiawatha Primer, 2 copies 
Laurel First Reader, 2 copies 
Laurel Second Reader, 2 copies 
Literary Reader, Book I, 2 copies 
Literary Reader, Book II, 2 copies 
Mother Goose Primer, 2 copies 
Natural Method Primer, 2 copies 
Natural Method First Reader, 2 copies 
Riverside Primer, 2 copies 
Riverside First Reader, 2 copies 
Story Hour Primer, 2 copies 
Story Hour First Reader, 2 copies 

Magazines and Periodicals 
Harper's Magazine 
American Magazine 
Everybody's Magazine 
Good Housekeeping 
National Geographic 
Popular Mechanics 
World's Work 
Review of Reviews 
The New Republic 
Forest and Stream 
Saint Nicholas 
Boys' Life 
The American Boy 
John Martin's 
Little Folks 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THB 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THR 



Year Ending December 31, 1918 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Oscar E. Belden, Term expires 1921 

John F. O'Dea, Chairman, Term expires 1920 

Adam J. Smith, Secretary, Term expires 1919 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Theodore W. King, Hadley, Mass. 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield 
schools). 

C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet and West Hat- 
field schools). 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
S. W. Kingsley 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Term opens Dec. 30, 1918, closes Mar. 28, 1919. 
Term opens Apr. 7, 1919, closes June 29, 1919 
Term opens Sept. 8, 1919, closes Dec. 19, 1919. 



Report of School Committee 



The committee have given special attention to 
the several matters pertaining to the schools during 
the past year. The influenza epidemic made it neces- 
sary to close the schools for several weeks which 
hindered the work of the school but they are now on 
a working basis again and it is with the hope of con- 
tinuing with no more interruptions. 

The school at Bradstreet consisted of a single 
school in which the teacher had an assistant but this 
year it was changed to separate schools consisting of 
a primary and a grammar department which arrange- 
ment proves much more satisfactory. 

The resignation of the superintendent of schools 
made it necessary to select another superintendent. 

The meeting of the Joint District Committee was 
held for this purpose and the present superintendent 
was selected for this work. 

It is the desire of the committee that some action 
be taken at town meeting where by the committee can 
be relieved of further responsibility in the care of the 
old school building on School Street. It is not need- 
ed for school purposes. 

The committee realize the condition of the build- 
ing at West Hatfield and that their report applies to 
day as well as a year ago. 



55 



Financial Statement 

For Fiscal Year Ending Dec. 31, 1918. 
RESOURCES 



From State: 

Superintendent of Schools, 
School Fund, 


$625.00 
790.98 


Tuition: 

Whately, 
Northampton, 


$ 1415.98 

162.49 

84.00 


Town Appropriation, 


246.49 
14,500.00 



16,441.85 
EXPENDITURES 



Salaries : 




Teachers, 


9,726.80 


Janitors, 


1,482.45 


Supervisors, 


408.00 


Superintendent of Schools, 


936.33 


School Committee, 


65.00 




X 11,618.58 


Books and supplies, 


218.84 


Fuel, 


1739.43 


Repairs, 


373.52 


Transportation, 


184.19 


Miscellaneous, 


71.18 


Total expenditures, 


$15,206.04 


Unexpended, 


1,235.81 



Report of the 

Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and Citizens of the Town 
of Hatfield: 

For the purpose of considering the general con- 
dition and certain lines of procedure for the welfare 
of the schools, I hereby have the pleasure to present 
my first annual report. 

,To present the general condition of the schools 
would require the consideration of every phase of 
school work. But in that the time covered by this re- 
port has been for only a few months it seems best that 
the general condition be limited to so much as would 
be indicated in_the few special topics which seem most 
important to consider. 

ATTENDANCE 

There is hardly any phase of school work that is 
more important to the pupil than regular attendance. 
If absent the pupil certainly does not get the work. 
Any great amount of absence retards the work of 
the school as a whole. 

The attendance during the fall term was hardly 
sufficient to expect the accomplishment of the regular 
amount of work. The closing of the schools on ac- 
count of the epidemic reduced the regular time but 
the absence of many who were kept out on account 
of fear of the disease made the time lost much more. 



The readiness with which pupils are kept out of 
school develops in the pupil a disregard for attend- 
ance and results in harm to the pupil and to the school. 

The establishing of a later date for the closing of 
schools will permit of making up some work. How- 
ever this later date for the closing of school should 
have been established even if there had been no loss 
of time since the longer school year was actually 
needed. 

TEACHEBS 

The fact that while the schools have been in ses- 
sion there have been with one exception no changes in 
the teaching force has been fortunate for that has 
made it possible to make up as much of the work as 
under any conditions. 

The death of Miss Lynch was a great loss. Her 
ability as a teacher was recognized and the sadness 
was felt by all her associates in school work. 

HEALTH AND HYGIENE 

There is very much that the pupil can be taught 
in health and hygiene. In many places a definite 
course with a regular health program is in use. 

The war has made many realize more fully the 
need of such instruction. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The need of physical education is extensive 
enough to have some work taken up in this direction, 
and the usefulness of physical training is great enough 
to have it made quite general. 



58 

The condition under which children study as well 
as the conditions of their every day life make it rather 
imperative that there shall be some form of physical 
training. 

Such training improves the health and vigor of 
the body and results in better school work as well as 
better physical development. 

With a view to having such work taken up in 
each school as seems advisable, a copy of Clark's 
Physical Education/ ' was purchased and supplied to 
each school. 

AGE OF ADMISSION 

The great number of children in some of the 
primary rooms at the opening of schools presented a 
special problem. Several of the children were just 
five years of age. Children of this age are not usu- 
ally able to do the work of the first grade in a single 
year. They also take so much more of the teacher's 
time and attention that the teacher can not help the 
others as much as she could otherwise. 

Children who wait until they are older are more 
apt to be promoted every year and they make a bet- 
ter record in each grade. Then they are more mature 
and more capable of doing high school work. It has 
been proven that the older a pupil is before entering 
school the less number of years it takes that pupil to 
complete the work of the eight grades. 

It was decided that for a pupil to be admitted 
to school in September the pupil must have been five 
years of age the March preceding and that a pupil 
cannot enter during the year unless the pupil is go- 



59 

ing to be seven years of age during that year. This 
regulation with reference to admission goes into ef- 
fect the following September. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

The number of children in the lowest grades at 
the Center was more than could be taught as effect- 
ively as is needed in those grades so some were trans- 
ferred to the Hill school thus having a third grade at 
that school without making the number too great and 
leaving the right number in the lower grades at the 
Center. The number in the sixth grade was more 
than could be accommodated in that room so a group 
were put into a room with a higher grade. 

The increasing number of pupils in school shows 
the great advantage of having such an excellent 
building with one room for each grade. It makes it 
possible for much better teaching and more effective 
work and better training of the pupils. 

The question of school building at the West has 
previously been reported and the same report applies 
now as well as at the time. The same advantages of 
a new building would apply for it would permit of 
school work under more favorable conditions. 

DRAWING. 

The resignation of the supervisor of drawing at 
the opening of schools came at a time when it is usu- 
ally difficult or impossible to secure the services of 
the most capable in this line of work. 

Such services have to be secured in conjunction 
with other towns in order to pay sufficient salary to 
get some one who can do good work. One other town 



60 

lias expressed it's readiness to have this work taken 
up. This question is being looked up with a view to 
having the work taken up as soon as a supervisor or 
excellent ability can be secured. 

The uses and the need of drawing in every- day 
life make it apparent that the pupils should have 
instruction in this study. It is. one form of expres- 
sion just as much as reading is a form of expression. 
It might seem at first thought as if one year during 
the time that a pupil is in school would be sufficient 
for such instruction but this is not the case. There 
is need of regular assignment and definite advance- 
ment in ability. 

It would not be claimed that every pupil could 
excell in drawing but it would be of great help to 
some and some help to all. Without it pupils who 
had great ability in this direction might never dis- 
cover that they had such ability. Drawing is one of 
the studies required by law which goes to show how 
important it is considered. 

Drawing enables the pupils to give free expres- 
sion to the facts, the appearance and the decoration 
of form. 

Drawing is the basis of working drawings and 
thus of all skilled trades. Power to observe keenly 
and to seek accurate information is one which should 
be developed early. 

A good way of proving the advantage of having 
a special teacher is to compare the work done with 
the work done where they do not have one. The work 
in drawing that has been done here is much better 
due to previous supervision. 



61 

Every teacher is willing to do what she can in 
teaching drawing but it is very seldom that a teacher 
has such ability where a special teacher has both 
ability and training. 

IN CONCLUSION 

Any accomplishment is based upon cooperation 
of those concerned and it is a great satisfaction to find 
a corps of teachers who have the light professional 
spirit and are so faithful to their work. It is indeed a 
pleasure to have the committee so interested in the 
welfare of the school*. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE W. KING. 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



The music course in the public schools of Hat- 
field has been one of the most successful along many 
lines. 

The basis of the course is song. In the primary 
grades, note songs which appeal to childhood are 
taught. As the child advances, the fundamentals of 
music are taught by definite steps under the headings 
of time, tune and notation. Voice training and in- 
dividual singing are of primary importance in this 
study of music. 

The aims of our course is to develop rhythmic 
expression, intelligent interpretation of songs and an 
appreciation of all good music for Hie true value of 
music in the home, social and national life of the 
American people is becoming more appreciated each 
day. 

The faithful work and cheerful cooperation of 
the grade teachers is a source of great inspiration to 
the supervisor. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 

January 23, 1919. 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 3t, 1919 



HERAXD JOB PRINT 



XORTHAMPTON. MASS. 



Finance Committee 



Without any frills or explanations we recommend 
the following: 

Seventh payment and interest, new school- 
house loan . . . ..;. ... .•• .... ... ... mmm »> $3,215.00 



Article 5 — Highways: 



Ordinary repairs, bridges, etc ..... . 2,500.00 

Patching, oiling and repairs stone roads 4,500.00 



Article 6 — Necessary town expenses: 



i 



Contingencies ... »(*< 1,300.00 

Bonds— Town officers . ... .& 100.00 

Care of Memorial Hall 150.00 

Salaries— Town officers 2,000.00 

Poor-^Care of 800.00 

Interest ... 850.00 

Insurance 1,100.00 

Inspection 200.00 

Tree warden 250.00 

Fire Department 500.00 

Schools — Maintenance 18,000.00 

Article 7— Memorial Day 100.00 

Article 10 — Care of cemeteries and fencing 500.00 

Article 11— Public Library 750.00 

Article 14 — School physician 100.00 



4 

Article 15— Smith Industrial School 250.00 

Article 18 — Hampshire Farm Bureau 150.00 

Article 19— Cement walk, Main street 2,000.00 

^ rticle 20 — Bradstreet stone road 5,000.00 

Article 21— New steam roller 4,350.00 

Article 22— Street lights 4,565.00 

Article 23— Stone road, Valley street 1,200.00 

Article 25— Stone road, Depot road . . 3,000.00 



$57,430.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
GEORGE S. BELDEN, 

Finance Committee 



Articles in the Warrant for Town 
Meeting, February 2, 1920 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Hampshire, ss. 

To L. H. Kingsley, one of the Constables of the 
Town of Hatfield, in said County, Greeting: — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts you are hereby directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield, qualified to vote 
in elections and town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall 
in said Hatfield on Monday, the 2d day of February, 
next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and there 
to act on the following named articles, to wit : — 

Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at 
said meeting. 

Article 2-^-To choose all necessary town officers 
for the ensuing year: Town Clerk; three Selectmen; 
one Assessor for 3 years; Town Treasurer; one School 
Committee for 3 years; one Water Commissioner for 
3 years; one Water Commissioner for 2 years, (to 
fill vacancy); one Sinking Fund Commissioner for 3 
years » one Trustee Public Library for 3 years; Audi- 
tor; Tree Warden; Elector under the Will of Oliver 
Smith; Tax Collector; Farm Bureau Director; six 
Constables; and to vote on the question — ''Yes" or 
"No ,,s -^Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of in- 
toxicating liquors in this town? All the foregoing to 
be voted for on one ballot. 



6 

The Polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, and be kept open at least four hours, and for 
such longer time as the majority of the voters present 
shall direct, but in no case shall they be kept open 
after the hour of eight o 'clock in the evening. 

Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various town 
officers and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4-^To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5 — To take action in relation to mainten- 
ance and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing 
year, and raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising 
money and appropriating same to defray the neces- 
sary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7 — To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8 — To take action in relation to support of 
the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

Article 9 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will raise and ap 
propriate money for care of cemeteries for the ensu- 
ing year, and for the purpose of fencing part way 
around the Elm Street Cemetery. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the Public Library for the en- 
suing year. 



Article 12 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will vote to author- 
ize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue 
of the current financial year. 

Article 14 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for the employment of one or 
more School Physicians, in accordance with the provi 
sions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hat- 
field children attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 16-^To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for supplies and maintenance of the 
Fire Department. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for Tree Warden and Brown 
Tail Moth work. 

Article 18=— To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for support of the Hampshire County 
Farm Bureau. 

Article 19-^To see if the town will vote to con- 
tinue building cement walks, and raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $2,000 — of this sum $1,500 to be ex- 
pended where leaving off last fall on Main street and 
going south, — and $500 at Academy corner going 
north. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000 — to be expended 



8 

with a like amount received from the State under pro- 
visions of Chapter 525, Acts of 1910, in building a 
permanent road of stone — going north from near resi- 
dence of William L. Belden, in Bradstreet. 

Article 21 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money necessary for the 
purchase of a new Steam Roller. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for Street Lights, 
and authorize the Selectmen to make a one-year con- 
tract with the Amherst Gas or any other company. 

Article 23 — To see if the town will raise and 
appropriate $1,200 for building a stone road on Val- 
ley street. 

Article 24 — To see if the town will vote to sell 
the land and old school building on School street, and 
authorize the Selectmen or Treasurer to make convey- 
ance of same. 

Article 25 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $3,000 for building a per- 
manent road and making needed repairs on Depot 
Road, so-called. 

Article 26 — To see if the town will vote to build 
a concrete walk from the end of the present concrete 
walk on School street to Kingsley's bridge, and raise 
and appropriate the sum of $3,000 therefor — $1,500 to 
be assessed on the polls and estates of the town for 
the year 1921, and $1,500 to be assessed for the year 
1922, or act anything thereon 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: — 

In accordance with the requirements of the Stat 

utes of Massachusetts, the following report for the 
year ending* December 31, 1919, is respectfully sub- 
mi t ted 

STATE AID 

State aid paid to two persons . $144.00 

POOR EXPENDITURES 

City of Northampton $372.00 

City of Springfield 11.00 

City of Holyoke 167.50 

Dickinson Hospital 26.00 

F. G. Howard, sup 3.65 

It. J. Donyard, services, track 5.00 

A. Bartkiewicz, Chieopee 73.00 

Hampshire County Sanatorium 4.28 

$662.43 

INSURANCE 

H. L. Howard $58.50 

OLD £ILLS 

Charles A. Byrne $80.70 

Est. A. L. Strong, sand and gravel 10.00 

Frank Kruliski, sand 3.90 

M. W. Boyle, brick and cement 8.60 



10 

J. 8. Bardwell, snow work 7.80 

M. J. Brennan, sand 2.30 

N. J. Ryan, sup. 89.97 

$203.27 

SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 

Charles A. Byrne $150.00 

A. J. Bonneville 50.00 

$200.00 

HAMPSHIRE FARM BUREAU 

Hampshire Farm Bureau $150.00 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS AND SLAUGHTERING 

E. IS. Warner $180.00 

F. T. Bardwell , 108.00 

r.'i $288.00 

SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Tuition $196.08 

MEMORIAL DAY 

C. K Morton $106.05 

BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 

H. L. Howard, bond for treasurer $40.00 

H. L. Howard, bond for collector 50.00 

H. L. Howard, bond for water commissioner. . 8.00 

t : * " ■■■ : i , . . $98.oo 



11 

CARE MEMORIAL HALL 

H. W. Wolfram, coal $29.49 

H. D. Smith, coal 124.17 

John J. Betsold, wood 20.00 

William P. Boyle, painting 88.20 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor 75.00 



$336.86 



OARE OP CEMETERIES 

F. H. Bardwell, treasurer . $100.00 

SMITH ACADEMY 

luition $2,000.00 

CONTINOENCTES 

Benjamin Bernstein, rep $4.50 

Herald Job Print, town reports and ballots; . . 252.00 

Joseph Goelowski, police 46.50 

S. W. Kingsley, police 18.00 

A, R. Breor, police 24.50 

S. M. Bourdon, police 3.00 

Frank E. Davis, watches 71.50 

Amherst Gas Co., light town hall 49.27 

William P. Boyle, rep. and ptg 85.80 

H. L. Pellam, care Town Hall and clock 106.75 

Johnson's Book Store, books 4.50 

C. T. Bagnall, tax bills and licenses 6.45 

J. S. Bardwell, wood Town Hall 12.50 

W, and L. E, Gurley, sup . . 3.71 

M. C. Bailey & Co., matched boards 3&51 

Peter L. Balise, wiring and bulbs, Town Hall 27.17 

J. J. Betsold, wood Town Hall 42.00 

P. E. Mullany, stamps. T. reports and en 17.32 



12 

J. A. Sullivan, dusto Town Hall 13.60 

C. H. Chase, transfers 9.30 

0. D. Euse Co., badges 6.03 

F L. Shaw, Yomiee case 54.00 

Cook & Hickey, law papers 5.00 

M. J. Walsh, rep, chimney and bulkhead .... 63.90 

American Exp. Co., express on signs 1.07 

I*, H. Chew, binding order blanks 5.50 

Hobbs & Warren, sup 11.82 

Auto List Pub. Co 5.00 

Foster-Farrar Co., sup 2.50 

S. Pettyjohn, labor . . . 15.00 

Tax Collector, sale of "rocks," town 24.00 

C. I. Stowell, care Wilkin plot 4.00 

P. G. Howard, sup 3.70 

L. H. Kingsley, S. warrants, sup. fares, etc. . . . 63.80 

S. E. Briggs, filing saws .75 

W. H. Eiley & Co., stove. 37.35 

W. L. Graves, light, Town Hall 3.00 



$1,137.30 

ORDINAEY EEPAIES-- HIGHWAYS AND 
BRIDGES 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor $101.34 

William H. Dickinson, team and labor 17.50 

James L. Day, team and labor 45.50 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 42.00 

John J. Betsold, team and labor 7.00 

Thomas J. Eyan, superintendent 240.00 

Andrew Peanski, labor 21.00 

M, W. Boyle, care Common 25.00 

C. I. Stowell, care Common . 50.00 

J. A. Sullivan, sup 20.00 

Foster-Farrar Co., sup. 13.34 

Est. A. L. Strong, lumber, gravel and fence . . 373.72 



13 

Alex Donnis, plank 67.68 

George Kberlein, rep, bridge 68.90 

William Dashivsky, pipe for fence 143.40 

0. Howland Co., coupling for fence 50.00 

F. G. Howard, sup 11.57 

E. M. McGrath, rep. tool house 20.00 

Ben. Bernstein, labor 6.05 



$1,324.00 



STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Company $3,589,21 

TOWN OFFICERS 

Joseph T. Ryan, ballot clerk $4.00 

Robert J. McGrath, ballot clerk 9.00 

Charles I. Stowell, ballot clerk 13.00 

Joseph E. Godin, ballot clerk 13.00 

John R. McGrath, ballot clerk 5.00 

John W. Kiley, services selectman (1918) . . . 150.00 

Samuel F. ^Billings, services selectman (1918) 75.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, services selectman (1918) 75,00 
E. L. Graves, balance of salary as collector 

(1917) ..] 250.00 

E. L. Graves, part of salary as collector (1918) 150.00 

E. L. Graves, part of salary as collector (1919) 100.00 

L. H. Kingsley, assessor 241.50 

John R. McGrath, assessor 150.00 

R. W. Weber,, registrar of voters 15.00 

L. A. Billings, registrar of voters 15.00 

Thomas W. Ryan, registrar of voters 15.00 

L. H. Kingsley, town clerk and clerk Board of 

Selectmen 500.00 

L. H. Kingsley, treasurer and registrar voters 215.00 

R. F. Wells, sealer weights and measures .... 100.00 

$2,095.50 



14 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Ellen A. Waite, salary $175.00 

U. G. Dehey, assistant 10.20 

Margaret P. Ryan, assistant ; 39.30 

Hampshire Bookshop, books 32.44 

Bridgman & Lyman, books 21.54 

Library Bureau, supplies 15.27 

Gaylord Bros,, books 3.85 

Hochschild, Kohn & Co., books 7.11 

The Sherwood Co., books 117.15 

C. W. Clark Co., books 7.74 

.1. W. Heffernan, books 7.45 

Carrie C. Cutter, magazines 54.00 

Wells' Domestic, cleaning 3.75 

S. Cook Estate, fan 18.62 



$513.42 



TREE WARDEN 

Smith E. Briggs, filing saws, etc $2.50 

Foster-Farrar Co., supplies . . 1.81 



$4.31 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 



Theodore W. King, services as supt $900.00 

Mary L. Allaire, services as principal 978.50 

Theresa Nolan, teacher 692.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, teacher 730.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, teacher ....... 730.00 

Mary B. Powers, teacher 730.00 

Mildred Pease, teacher 692.00 

Lena H. Proulx, teacher 730.00 

Constance C. Breor, teaoher 730.00 

Mary C ? Leary, teacher 369.00 



15 



Regina M, Fortsch, teacher 662.00 

Laura F. Jubinville, teacher 662.00 

Hazel Powers, teacher , 662.00 

Jessie 0. McGregor, teacher 339.00 

Irene I. Devine, teacher 339.00 

Nellie E. Salvas, teacher 662.00 

Margaret O'Donnell, teadier 309.00 

Julia R. Lawless, teacher 309.00 

Catherine C. Brace, teacher 323.00 

Anna Shannon, teacher 246.00 

Kate Doyle, teacher 246.00 

Grace O'Brien, teacher , , . « 246.00 

Marion J. Hanley, teacher 118.00 

Cecile LaFleur, teacher . . 69.00 

Elsie Hemenway, teacher 36.00 

Celestine Wight, teacher 11.00 

Teachers ' Retirement Board 450.30 

Maude E. Boyle, music 346.62 

Bessie D. Ranlett, drawing 90.00 

Arthur Godin, janitor 900.00 

Frank Brehm, janitor 90.00 

George D. Kingsley, janitor 232.50 

Howard Wolfram, janitor 230.54 

Raymond Murphy, janitor 6.00 

Mrs. Joseph Liebe, janitor 165.00 

Joseph Goller, janitor 5.00 

John Salvas, janitor 216.00 

H. D. Smith, coal 1 ,684.20 

H. W. Wolfram, coal 625.08 

John J. Betsold, wood 40.00 

Pius LeVitre, sawing wood 6.00 

C. H. Crafts, sawing wood 4.50 

F. B. Bardwell, sawing wood 4.50 

William T. Fitzgibbons, plumbing 10.80 

Amherst Gas Co., light 18.38 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., phone 32.45 



16 



William P. Boyle, ptg. and rep 205.90 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway, tickets . . . 300.10 

Smith Academy, domestic science . . . . 33.00 

Edward M. McGrath, rep 60.30 

Daniel O'Neill, flags 16.91 

S. W. Kingsley, truant officer 17.60 

Wright & Potter Co., printing 2.00 

Consolidated Dry Goods, sup 11.35 

Arthur P. Woods, clocks 6.35 

F. M. Crittenden, printing 3.75 

Houghton-Mifflin Co., books . 17.63 

Bernice N. Cutter, census 18.00 

Fred G. Howard, sup 4.44 

O. Belden & Sons, labor 15.00 

W. H. Riley & Co., repairs 51.48 

Scott Harris, drawing coal 31.00 

Milton-Bradley Co., supplies 20.79 

E. E. Babb & Co., supplies 192.78 

Benjamin Sanborn & Co., books 21.64 

Ginn & Co., books 55.07 

Lyons & Cannahan, books 28.32 

Holden Book Cover Co 5.06 

Standard Oil Co 10.45 

Merrick Lumber Co 24.35 

Silver, Burdette & Co., books 54.72 

1 L. Harmnett Co., supplies 38.96 

Est. L. E. Warner, wiring 5.88 

John F. O'Dea, com. and labor 60.00 

O. E. Belden, com. and labor 20.00 

Adam J. Smith, com. and labor 20.00 



^W.W '.FT' 



""""""' "■ $19,037.70 

CHAPTER 155, ACTS OF 1918 

H. L. Bond Co., kettle $195.00 

New Eng. Ed. Mch. Co. sweeper 400.00 



17 



New Eng. Rd. Mch. Co., scraper blades 25.00 

J. S. Lane & Son, stone 184.50 

■The Barrett Co., oil and tarvia £ 2,751.37 

D. W. Lewis Co., tile and grates 452.34 

New Eng. Metal Calvert Co., culverts 276.70 

Northampton Iron Works, catch basins ..... 18.00 

B. & M. Railroad, freight on oil and tarvia . . . 496.72 

B, & M. Railroad, freight on tile 143.71 

B. & M. Railroad, freight kettle and tar 63.35 

B. & M. Railroad, freight on stone 222.89 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., freight on sweeper. . . 13.43 

R. A. Slocombe, tar can 2.75 

George Eberlein, rep 11.07 

Good Roads Mch. Co., brooms 7.76 

Foster-Farrar Co., shovels 14.51 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile and rep 10.40 

A B. Knit, rep 2.55 

L. H. Kingsley, tile and sand 10.50 

Thomas W. Ryan, sand 4.00 

M. J. Brumann, sand 4.70 

George Furst, sand 4.80 

E. N. Dickinson, sand 23.85 

John F. O'Dea, sand 1.10 

M. J. Ryan, sand 2.00 

North Hatfield Grain Co., cement 10.50 

Webster Box Co., boards 13.13 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 87.50 

M. H. Dwight, team and labor 5.00 

James L. Day, team and labor 10.00 

John C. Ryan, team and labor 122.50 

EL A. Ryan, team and labor 5.00 

William H. Dickinson, team and labor 135.00 

John T. Powers, team and labor 994.00 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 612.50 

Paul N. Balise, team and labor 3.50 

William R. Cutter, team and labor 3.50 



18 



E. A. Breor, team and labor 3.50 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor 24.00 

A. W. Morton, team and labor 28.00 

Thomas M. Day, team and labor 56.00 

William C. Kingsley, team and labor 7.00 

F. P. Jones, team and labor 7.00 

C. H. Crafts, team and labor 44.75 

M. O. Strong, labor 1.50 

Fred H. Bardwell, team and labor 31.50 

Thomas J. Eyan, superintendent 1,074.00 

Matthew B. Ryan, labor 126.00 

Joseph T. Ryan, labor 6.00 

Henry Stoddard, labor 274.00 

Jacob Geis, labor 310.77 

George M. Franklin, labor 157.50 

Adam Parmski, labor 78.00 

John Fuset, labor 31.00 

Paul Uregnelewioz, labor 16.50 

Josep Ragensky, labor 30.00 

Thomas McGrath, labor 87.00 

Mike . Kuzinski, labor 6.00 

John Vachula, labor 15.00 

Jacob Dubiel, labor 77.50 

Joseph Eberlein, labor 7.50 

F. G. Vollinger, labor 7.00 

Frank Barowski, labor 80.00 

W. L. Graves, labor 4.00 

Mike Konopko, labor 92.00 

Peter Branin, labor 22.00 



L. ", ,". " $10,050.15 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

H L. Pellam, labor at fires $5.00 

John W. Mullins, labor at fires 18.00 

Paul E. Balise, labor at fires 9.00 



19 

J. J. Betsold, fires and storing hose wagon. . . 25.00 

Fred Wentzel, fires and storing hose wagon. . 11.00 

Am. LaFrance Co., supplies 102.00 

M. J. Eyan, salary fire chief 100.00 

Thomas M. Day, hose wagon 5.00 

H. W. Marsh, hose wagon 5.00 

Kate Mullins, hose wagon 5.00 

C. H. Crafts, hose wagon 5.00 

$290.00 

CEMENT WALKS 

Merrick Lumber Co., boards $27.96 

H. D. Smith, cement 295.10 

E. E. Davis, grade walk 16.50 

John T. Powers, team and labor 84.00 

Thomas J. Eyan, superintendent 85.50 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 56.00 

John F. O'Dea, team and labor 7.00 

James L. Day, truck 10.00 

Henry Stoddard, labor 49.00 

Joseph T. Eyan, labor 24.00 

Matthew B. Eyan, labor 42.00 

John B. Bitner, labor 5.00 

John Vachula, labor 24.00 

Jacob Geis, labor 30.26 

Frank Dulaski, mason 55.00 

Michael Dulaski, mason 60.50 



$871.82 

CHESTNUT STEEET STONE EOAD 

The Barrett Co., tarvia and oil . $314.60 

J. S. Lane & Sons, stone 382.20 

3 & M. Eoad, freight on stone 36732 



" ~ "•" 20 ~ ' 

Buffalo Roller Co., repairs on roller 25.85 

John T. Powers, team and labor 105.00 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 145.50 

William C. Kingsley, team and labor 70.00 

F. O. Vollinger, team and labor 84.00 

Samuel Osley, team and labor - 21.00 

Thomas J. Ryan, superintendent 126.00 

Matthew B. Ryan, labor 31.50 

Henry Stoddard, labor 74.25 

Jacob Geis, labor 49.51 

John Fuset, labor 40.25 

Kate Mullins, sand 13.50 

$1,850.48 
WELCOME DAY — SOLDIER BOYS 

William H. Dickinson, orchestra $27.00 

H B. Roach, band 110.68 

Whitehead & Hoag Co., medals 172.11 

Paul E. Balise, prizes 24.95 

Albert Bean, use of dishes 60.00 

Holyoke Public Market, meat and provisions 27.97 

D. J. Median, poultry 69.00 

H. Louise Billings, napkins 1.35 

H, D. Smith, ice 2.50 

Annie M. Boyden, rolls 9.00 

H. W. Briggs, milk .,'.".- 6.20 

H. W. Carl, groceries 23.48 

Beckmann % ice cream 18.54 

Metcalf Printing Co., cards 4.25 

Warren & Watts, lamps and shades 10.50 

$567.53 



21 



RECAPITULATION OF ODERS DRAWN— 1919 

State Aid . ... $144.00 

Old bills '. . . . 203.27 

School physicians 200.00 

Poor— Care of 662.43 

Inspection 288.00 

Contingencies 1,137.30 

Ordinary Repairs — Highways and bridges . . . 1,324.00 

Memorial Day 106.05 

Bonds— Town officers 98.00 

Memorial Hall 336.86 

Schools— Maintenance of 19,037.70 

Town Officers 2,095.50 

Street lights 3,589.21 

Public Library 513.42 

Fire Department 290.00 

Chapter 155, Acts of 1918 10,050.15 

Tree Warden 4.31 

Insurance 58.50 

Smith Industrial School 196.08 

Cement walks 871.82 

Chestnut Street Stone Road 1,850.48 

Farm Bureau 150.00 

Welcome Home Day 567.53 

Smith Academy 2,000.00 

Care of cemeteries 100.00 

Total ...$45,874.61 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. KILEY, 

E. A. BREOR, 

WILLIAM H. DICKINSON, 

Selectmen of Hatfield 

I have this day examined the books of the Select- 
men, and found them correct. 
January 7, 1920. CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor 



22 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD— 1920 



Balise, Paul N. 
Bardwell, Fred T. 
fillings, Samuel F. 
Crafts, Carlton H. 
Chandler, Joseph F. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Dickinson, William H. 
Day, John H. 
Dwight, Myron H. 
Fitzgerald, Richard F. 
Field, Edgar H. 
Godin, Joseph E. 
Graves, Murray B. 
Howard, Harry L. 
Marsh, Harry W. 
McGrath, James L. 
Jones, Frank P. 
Proulx, Leon R. 
Powers, Lawrence A. 
Sheehan, John L. 
Sheehan, Daniel P. 
Slattery, Charles F. 
Strong, Edgar W. 
Stowell, Charles I. 
Ryan, Edward A. 
Ryan, Matthew J. 
La Vitre, Paul 
Wight, Leland H. 



Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Insurance 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Sexton 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 

. Dr. 

To Balance in Treasury ■ $6,263.60 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, coll. (1917) 2.256.42 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, coll. (1918 ) 16,234.68 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, coll (1919) 33,745.43 

Treasurer, Water Commissioners ......... 2,900.00 

District Court fines 112.00 

Jitney, pool and slaughter licenses 10.00 

Junk, fruit and State licenses 68.00 

Sealer's receipts 64.37 

Eent of Town Hall— Janitor 99.00 

Rent of Town Hall— Picture Co.. 55.00 

Rent school building — Fitzgibbons 80.00 

Rent school building and clock — S. M, 

Bourdon 17.50 

S. M. Bourdon— Labor filling 220.28 

P. R. Mullany— Rent for P. O ... 84.00 

Paul Zimna — Loam 9.00 

J. S. Bardwell— Lumber 6.00 

George Fusek — Cemetery plot and digging 

grave 8.00 

John L. Boyle— Sale of tile , 14.00 

John W. Kiley— Gravel , . . . 2.00 

Mike Yoniec Est 2.41 

First Parish— Oement 2.00 

George D. Kingsley — Sewer entrance 33.00 

John C. Ryan — Culvert and gravel 50.00 



24 

Insurance loss on tool house 60.00 

Mary L. Allaire— Tickets sold 289.14 

County Treasurer — Dog fund 63.00 

Interest on deposits 317.39 

City of Northampton 5 — Tuition 147.00 

State— Income Mass. School fund 962.07 

Supt. School Union 625.00 

Highway Commission — Posts sold .... 12.50 

Highway Commission' — On Chapter 155 1,428.99 

Income Tax 1,910.76 

Income Tax-^Schools . . 1,030.00 

Subsidy — Consumptives 115.71 

Support sick pauper 73.14 

Industrial School 128.47 

Inspection of animals 65.00 

State aid 144.00 

Corporation tax 423.06 

National bank tax 757.14 

Cash received from Temporary Loans: — 

S N. Bond & Co., notes No. 54, 

55,56 $24,105.73 

8. N. JSond & Co., note No. 57 . . . 14,283.54 

a N. Bond & Co., note No. 59 . . . 7,828.92 46,218.19 

r $117,107.31 



25 

Cr. 

By cash paid 'Selectmen's orders. $45,874.61 

Interest on water bonds 2,000.00 

District Court fees , . 83.97 

Bureau of Statistics 10.00 

County tax 4,668.15 

State tax 4,950.00 

State special tax 297.00 

State highway tax 708.00 

State soldiers ' exemption 15.80 

Treasurer Sinking Fund 903.00 

Balance in treasury , 4,291.78 

By cash paid outstanding notes: — ■ 

C. D. Parker & Co., Note No. 49 5,000,00 

C. D. Parker & Co., Note No. 50. 7,000.00 

C. D. Parker & Co., Note No. 51,2 3,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 53 10,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 54. . 10,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No, 56. 10,000,00 

S. N.JBond & Co., Note No. 56 5,000.00 

6th Note and Interest— Schoolhousv ....... 3,305.00 

$117,107.31 



26 
IN ACCOUNT WITH E. J,. GKAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1917 Taxes) 

Dr 

To cash received $2,256.42 

Assessors ' orders of abatement 252.10 $2,508.52 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes $2,130.85 

Sum to balance ... 39.65 

Addition to Warrant 166.33 

Interest collected 171.69 2,508.52 

(1918 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received $16,234.68 

Assessors' orders of abatement 14.00 
Uncollected taxes 2,016.69 18,265.37 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes 17,918.35 

Interest collected 347.02 18,265.37 

(1919 Taxes) 

Br. 

To cash received $33,745.43 

Uncollected taxes 17,514.69 51,260.12 



27 

Or. 

By Assessors' Warrant $50,759.86 

Addition to Warrant 457.15 

Interest collected 43.11 51,260.12 

I nave examined the accounts of the Tax Collector 
and find that he has been credited by the Treasurer 
with the amounts of $2,256.42 of the' taxes of 1917, 
$16,234.68 of the taxes of 1918, and $33,745,43 of the 
taxes of 1919. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor 
January 7, 1920 ; 



WATER SINKING FUND 

To thirty years four per cent Water- Bonds, $50,000.00 
By Sinking Fund 29,461.35 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

To outstanding Notes: — 

Note No. 57, due July 10, 1920 $15,000.00 

Note No. 59, due May 12, 1920 8,000.00 



$23,000.00 



Cr. 

By uncollected taxes (1918) . . . 
Uncollected taxes (1919) . . 
Due from State — Chap. 155 

Due from State Aid 

State — Smith School 



$2,016.69 

17,514.69 

436.77 

144.00 

88.04 



28 

State-^Inspection of animals 65.00 

Bills due 241.00 

Balance in treasury * « 4,291.78 

— ~- ~— $24,797.9; 



balance in favor of the Town . . $1,797.97 

L. H. KHSTGSLEY. Treasurer 



I have examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Town of Hatfield for the year ending 
December 31st, 1919, and find them correct. I find 
Selectmen's orders on file to the amount of Forty-five 
thousand, eight hundred seventy-four dollars, and 
sixty-one cents ($45,874.61), with evidence of their 
payment by him, also, cancelled notes and receipts for 
County and State Taxes, and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of Four thousand 
two hundred ninetv-one dollars and seventy-eight 
cents ($4,291.78). 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor 

January 7, 1920. 



REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

We (have tiie following amounts deposited to the 
credit of the Sinking Fund:— 

Haydenville Savings Bank . .... ... . $1,477.12 

Northampton Institution for Savings 1,298.96 

Easthampton Savings Bank 987.31 

Florence Savings Bank 986.87 

Nonotuck Savings Bank 1,580.75 

Union Trust Co., Springfield 2,794.17 

Springfield Institution for Savings ..... % . . 1,266.39 

Springfield Five Cents Savings Bank ..... 1,285.52 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Holyoke 1,364.26 

Springfield St, Railway Bond " 1,000.00 

p. & M. R. R. Co. Bond 3,000.00 

N- Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. Bond 2,000.00 

U.S. Liberty Bond 2,000.00 

U. S. Victory Bond 1,000.00 

Town of Hatfield Water Bond 7,000.00 

B & M. Coupons 420.00 



$29,461.35 
M. J. RYAN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 
BXCENT E GODIN, 
Sinking Fund Commissioners 



I have this day examined the vouchers and securi- 
ties of the Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them 
correct. 



CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the 
Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Board of Water 
Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows: — 

^Balance on deposit from last year's account. . $148.05 

Certificate of deposit 1,800.00 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

Cash from collection of water rates 5,133.65 

Sale of lumber 400.00 

Interest on bonds 68.5Q 

Interest on certificate 63.00 



i $8,613.29 

We have paid the past year as follows: — 

Town of Hatfield ; .$2,900.00 

Salaries of Water Commissioners. 87.50 

8. W. Kingsley, labor . 14.25 

W. H. Riley & Co., supplies , 141.34 

Norwood Engineering Co., supplies 60.00 

Chapman Mfg. Co., supplies. 29.00 

J. H. Pierce, paint 17.00 

W. P. Boyle, painting hydrants . . . . 30.25 

I H. Kingsley, recording deeds and stamps . . 8.75 
E. W. Strong, collecting water rate£, labor and 

cash paid 306.01 

$3,594.10 



31 

Balance in Treasury: — 

Cash on deposit ../.... .$1,219.19 

Certificate of deposit 1,800.00 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

One Victory Bond 1,000.03 

$8,613.29 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. KILEY, 
MICHAEL J. PROULX, 
MICHAEL W. BOYLE, 

Water Commissioners 

I have this day examined the hooks and accounts 
of the Treasurer of the Water Co:nmis«ioners of the 
Town of Hatfield and find them correct with vouchers 
on file for all payments made and a balance in the 
Treasury of $5,019.19. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor 

January 7th, 1920 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for 
the year 1919 are as follows: 



BIRTHS BY MONTHS 

No. Males 

January 9 5 

February 6 1 

March 3 3 

April 10 9 

May 8 2 

June 8 3 

July 7 2 

August 10 5 

September 10 5 

October 11 7 

November 9 5 

December 7 3 



Females 
4 
5 

1 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 



98 



50 



48 



^BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 

Father Mother 

Born in United States 21 22 

Born in Poland 63 59 

Born in Austro-Hungary 13 14 

Born in Ireland 1 

Born in Germany 1 2 

98 98 



33 

BIRTHS FOB FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 

93 92 122 101 90 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

January 1 

February 1 

March. 2 

April 3 

May 2 

June 7 

July : 2 

August 

September 2 

October 2 

November 2 

December 2 

26 

First marriage of both parties 22 

First of groom, second of bride 1 

Second of groom, first of bride 2 

Second of groom, second of bride 1 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 46 and 22 years 
of age, respectively 

The oldest and youngest brides were 40 and 17 years 
of age, respectively 



34 
BIRTHPLACES OP PERSONS MARRIED 

Groom Brid" 

Born in the United States 15 16 

Born in Poland 10 8 

Born in Austria " 1 

Bom in Mexico 1 

Bom in Italy 1 

26 26 

MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


33 


38 


29 


28 


14 



DEATHS BY MONTHS 

No. Males FemaL 

January 1 1 

February 4 4 

March 4 3 1 

April 4 2 2 

May 3 1 2 

June 3 3 

July 1 1 

August 1 1 

September 1 1 

October 1 1 

November 5 2 3 

December 4 2 2 

32 14 18 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed personal estate $518,943.00 

Value of assessed real estate 1,953,450.00 

Total value of assessed estate $2,472,393.00 

Value of assessed buildings 987,429.00 

Value of assessed land 966,021.00 

$1,953,450.00 

Number of polls assessed 656 

Residents assessed on property 422 

Non-residents assessed on property 78 

Number of persons assessed on property . . 500 

For poll tax only 357 

Rate of tax per $1,000 $20.00 

Number of horses assessed 441 

Number of cows assessed 207 

Number of neat cattle 50 

Number of fowls 130 

Number of dwelling houses 411 

Acres of land 9,218 

State tax $4,950.00 

State highway tax 297.00 

Statue special tax 297.00 

County tax 4,668.15 

Town tax 38,387.24 

Overlayings 1,749.47 

$50,759.86 



38 

Estimated bank and corporation tax $1,050.00 

State income tax 1 ,640.76 

Excise tax 422.95 

Addition to warrant 30.20 

Value of property exempt from taxation under Chap- 
ter 409, Acts of 1909:— 

Literary institutions $71,559.00 

Church property 32,200.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R, McGRATH, 
H. E. GRAVES, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield 



Report of Library Trustees 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The report of the librarian is herewith submitted, 
covering in detail the work of the Public Library dur- 
ing the year 1919. 

R, F. WELLS, 
MRS. DAVID MXTLLANY, 
PETER L. BELISE, 

Library Trustees 



Report of the Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library: 

During the year 1919, 303 books have been added 
to the library, 153 for adults and 150 in the juvenile 
department. 

The circulation during the year has materially in 
creased, being 5,550 in the juvenile department and 
4,523 in the adult, making a total circulation of books 
and magazines of 10,073,, as compared with 6,408 last 
year. Also eighty books have been taken by teachers 
of the Center School for circulation among the upper 
grade pupils. The school children have never, since 
1 have been librarian, shown such interest in reading 
worth-while books as at the present time. 

JBooks have been circulated in Bradstreet, West 
Hatfield, and North Hatfield as usual, in charge of Mrs. 
Laura Pelden, Miss Carrie Cutter, and Mr. G. H. 
Danforth. 

A set of 26 books in the Polish language, loaned 
by the Massachusetts Library Association, were re- 
ceived in September, replacing the set loaned last year. 

I have received $9.10 from fines and $2.55 from 
the sale of old paper. I have expended $6.77 for post- 
age, express, and supplies, leaving a balance of $4.88. 

Miss Margaret P. Evan assists Tuesday afternoons 
and Saturday evenings. 

The library is open on Tuesdays from 3 to 5 P. M. 
and on Saturdays from 3 to 5 P. M. and 7 to 9 P. M. 

EULEN A. WAITE, Librarian 



41 



BOOKS ENTERED DUR1NO 1919 

Fiction 



The Young "Visitors" 

Patricia Brent, Spinster 

The Rain Girl 

Joan and Oo. 

A Woman's Woman 

The Playground of Satan 

The Tin Soldier 

Clayhanger 

The Eoll Call 

Buried Alive 

Brandon of the Engineers 

Alton of Somasco 

The Intriguers 

Carmen's Messenger 

The Buccaneer Farmer 

His Friend, Miss McFarlane 

Kitty Canary 

Jean of Lazy A 

Skyricler 

Starr of the Desert 

How Could You, Jean! 

Ranny 

Tale of Mr. Tubbs 

Philo Gubb 

Destiny 

My Antonia 

Hillsboro People 

Miss Fingal 

The Sfkypilot in No Man's Land 

Cap'n Jonah's Fortune 

The Arrow of Gold 

The Night Riders 

The Forfeit 



Daisy Ashford 

Anonymous 

Anonymous 

Frederick Orin Bartlett 

Nalbro Bartley 

Beatrice Baskerville 

Temple Bailey 

Arnold Bennett 

Arnold ^Bennett 

Arnold Bennett 

Harold Bindloss 

Harold Bindloss 

Harold Bindless 

Harold Bindloss 

Harold Bindloss 

Kate L. Bosher 

Kate L. Bosher 

B. M. Bower 

B. M. Bower 

B. M. JBower 

Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd 

Howard Brubaker 

J. E. Buckrose 

Ellis Parker Butler 

Charles Neville Buck 

Willa Cather 

Dorothv Canfield 

Mrs. W. K. Clifford 

Ralph Connor 

James A. Cooper 

Joseph Conrad 

Ridgwell Cullum 

Ridgwell Cullum 



42 



Xiu$ L&woreakers 

The River's End 

The Courage of Capt. Plum 

Gobel 

The Lamp in the Desert 

The Keeper of the Door 

The Way of an Eagle 

The Three Mucketeers 

Roberta of Roseberry Gardens 



RiUgweil Cuiium 

James Oliver Ourwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

Ethel M. Deli 

Ethel M. Dell 

Ethel M. Deli 

Alexandre Dumas 

Frances Duncan 



Christopher and Columbus 

Author of Elizabeth and Her German Garden 
Fanny, Herself Edna Ferber 

Saint's Progress John Galsworthy 

White Horse and Red Haired Girl K. Gambier 

The Secret Witness 



The Yellow Dove 

The Golden Bough 

The Patrician 

The Desert of Wheat 

Wildfire 

The Street of Adventure 

Under Handicap 

Firecracker Jane 

The Secret of the Tower 



George Gibbs 

George Gibbs 

George Gibbs 

John Galsworthy 

Zane Grey 

Zane Grey 

Philip Gibbs 

Jackson Gregory 

Alice Calhoun Haines 

Anthony Hope 



The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse 

V. Blasco Ibane& 



The Apartment Next Door 

Limpy 

Three Live Ghosts 

The City of Comrades 

The Light That Failed 

The Fortunes of the Landreys 

Tang of Life 



Wm. Johnston 

W T m. Johnston 

Frederic S. Isham 

,Basil King* 

Rudyard Kipling 

Vaughan Kester 

Henrv Herbert Knibbs 



The Web 

The Long Chance 

The Valley of the Giants 



Frederic Arnold Kummer 
Peter B. Kyne 
Peter B. Kyne 



Webster, Man's Man 

Chloe Malone 

The Raincoat Girl 

The Cruise of the Dazzler 

South Sea Tales 

The Hope Chest 

The Moving Finger 

A Voice in the Wilderness 

The Pirate Wire to Washington 

Parrot and Co. 

The Girl in His House 

Her Husband 's Purse 

From the Housetops 

Temperamental Henry 

The Vinegar Saint 

Pandora's Box 

Rainbow Valley 

The Curious Quest 

The Kingdom of the Blind 

The Double Traitor 

Peter Ruff and Double Four 

The Malefactor 

Zeppelin's Passenger 

The Beloved Traitor 

The Night Operator 

The World For Sale 

Six Star Ranch 

Dawn 

Esmeralda 

The Pirate of Panama 

The Cloister and the Hearth 

Miss Jimmy 

Red and >Blaek 

Long Live the King 

Dangerous Davs 

K 



Peter 1>. Kyne 

Fannie Heaslip Lea 

Jeannette Lee 

Jack London 

Jack London 

Mark Lee Luther 

Natalie Sumner Lincoln 

Grace L. Sutz 

Harold MacGrath 

Harold MacGrath 

Harold MacGrath 

Helen R. Martin 

George Barr McCutcheon 

Samuel Merwin 

Hughes Mearnes 

J. A. Mitchell 

L. M. Montgomery 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

, E. Phillips Oppenhein 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

Frank L. Packard 

Frank L. Packard 

Sir Gilbert Parker 

Eleanor Porter 

Eleanor Porter 

Nina Wilcox Putnam 

Wm. MacLeod Blaine 

Charles Read? 

Laura E. Richards 

Grace Richmond 

Mary Roberts Rineharr 

Mary Roberts Rineharl 

Mary Roberts Rinehart 



44 



Tish 

Tharon of Lost Valley 

The Undefeated 

Araminta 

American Pep 

The Man Who Lost Himself 

Buek 

Shops and Houses 

Nocturne 

The Mystery of the 13th Floor 

David and Jonathan 

The Starling 

The Close Up 

His Love Story 

Spraggs Canyon 

Helena 

Little Miss by the Day 

Van Cleve 

Merry Andrew 

The Maxwell Mystery 

You're Only Young Once 

Everyman's Land 

Piccadilly Jim 

The Prince and Betty 

When a Man's a Man 

The Re-creation of Brien Kent 

The Avalanche 

Dr. David 



Mary .Roberts Kinehart 

Virgie E. Roe 

J. C. Shaith 

J. C. Snaith 

A. Stone 

H. D. Stackpole 

Charles D. Stewart 

Frank Swinnerton 

Frank Swinnerton 

Lee Thayer 

E. Temple Thurston 

Juliet Wilbor Tompkins 

Margaret Turnbull 

Marie Van Vorst 

Horace Annesly Vachell 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

Lucille Van Slyke 

Mary S. Watts 

F. Roney Weir 

Carolyn Wells 

Margaret Widdemer 

0. N. and A. M. Williamson 

P. G. Wodehouse 

P. G. Wodehouse 

Harold Bell Wright 

Harold Bell Wright 

Gertrude Atherton 

Marjorie Benton Cooke 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Working My Way Around the World Franck 

My Company Capt. Carroll J. Swan 

The Soul of the Soldiers Thomas Tiplady 

Little Grandmother of the Russian Revolution, 

Breshkovsky 
Yashka Marie JBotchkareva 



45 



Clarence Hawkes 

Theodore Roosevelt 

Robert Burns 



Hitting the Dark Trail 
African Game Trails 
Poetical Works 
The Great English Novelists 

W. J. and Coningsby Dawson 
Rubaiyat of 
Poland 

Lawrence Speaker 
Everyman, a Moral Play 
The Story of General Pershing 
Through College on Nothing a Year 
From Baseball to Boches 
History of the Yankee Division 
Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children 
Ambassador Morgenthau's Story Morgenthau 

Chaucer's Canterbury Pilgrims 

Retold by Katherine B. Lee 
Henry Ford's Own Story Rose Wilder Lane 

Endicott and! Frances Lester Warner 

Bluejackets of 1898 Willis J. Abbott 

JUVENILE DEPARTMENT 



Omar Khayyam 
G. E. Slocombe 
E. G. Lawrence 

E. Tomlinson 

Gauss 

H. C. Witwer 

Denwell 



Guns of Europe 

Isabel Carleton's Year 

A Girl Scout of Red Rose Troop 

Dorothy Dainty of Foam Ridge 

The Four Gordons 

At the Butterfly House 

The Cruise of the Cachelot 

Boy Scouts in a Trapper 's Camp 

The Secret Garden 

Alice in Wonderland 

Danny Fists 

Boy Scouts at Sea 



Joseph A. Altsheler 

Margaret Ashmun 

Amy Blanch ard 

Amy Brooks 

Edna A. Prown 

Edna A. Brown 

Frank T. Bullen 

T. W. Burgess 

Frances Hodgson Burnett 

Louis Carroll 

Waltef Camp 

Arthur A. Carey 



The Girl from the /Big Horn Country 
Grandpa's Little Girls Alien 1 



M. E. Chase 
Turner Curtis 



46 



Grandpa's Little Girls and Miss Abitha, 

Alice Turner Curtis 



Little Maid of Old Connecticut 

Miss Betty of New York 

Clyde Comers 

Be Prepared 

Merrylips 

Lucile on the Heights 



Alice Turner Curtis 

Ellen D. Deland 

Ellen D. Deland 

A. W. Dimock 

Beulah Marie Dix 

Elizabeth M. Driffield 



Boy Scouts in the Dismal Swamp 

Carolyn of t^e Corners 

Carolyn of t,he Sunny Heart 

Tom Slade on the River 

Greenacre Girls 

Jean of Greenacres 

The Poor Little Rich Girl 

Rusty Miller 

Hale Merrill 's Honey Quest 

Don Strong of the Wolf Patrol 

Katrinka: a Russian Child 

Young Alaskans in the Far North 

Outdoor Girls in Florida 

Outdoor Girls on Pine Island 

Bluebonnet 's Ranch Party 

Bluebonnet^ in Poston 

Polly and the Wishing Ring 

With Pershing at the Front 

Captain of the Eleven 

Little Miss Fales 

Polly Trotter, Patriot 

Saint Christopher 

Tom Strong Washington's Scout 

Anne of Green Gables 

Dicky, Knight Errant 

The Irish Twins 

The French Twins 

The Cave Twins 



Walter P. Eaton 

Ruth B. Endicott 

Ruth B. Endicott 

Percy K. Fitzhugh 

Izola L. Forrester 

Izola L. Forrester 

Eleanor Gates 

Joslyn Gray 

Annie E. Harris 

Wm. Heyliger 

Helen E. Haskell 

Emerson Hough 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Caroline E. Jacobs 

Caroline E. Jacobs 

Margaret Johnson 

Ross Kay 

A. A. Knipe 

A. A. and E. B. Knipe 

E. B. and A. A. Knipe 

Mary MacGregor 

A. B. Mason 

L. M. Montgomery 

Isabel M. Peacocke 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 



. ... .-„. .. 47 

The Spartan Twins Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Jacqueline of the Carrier Pigeons Seaman 

Sinbad the Sailor 

Five Little Peppers at School Margaret Sidney 

Young Puritans of Old Hadley Mary P. Wells Smith 
Young Puritans in Captivity Mary P. Wells Smith 
The Boy Captive of Old Deerfield, Mary P. Wells Smith 
Billy Burns of Troop 5 I. T. Thurston 

Scouting with Kit Carson Everett T. Tomlinson 



Scouting with Gen. Pershing Everett T. Tomlinson 
The Fort in the Forest Everett T. Tomlinson 

To the Land of the Caribou P. G. Tomlinson 

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Jules Verne 
The Gaunt, Grey Wolf Dillon Wallace 

Ungava Boh Dillon Wallace 

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm Kate Douglas Wiggin 
The Perfect Tribute Mary Shipman Andrews 

The Girl ^Beautiful Jean K. Baird 

Tracks and Tracking Josef f Brunner 

Boy Scouts Hike Book Edward Cave 

At Home in the Water Geo. H. Corsan 

Boy Scout Fire Fighters Irving Crump 

I Am an American Sara Cone Bryant 

The Last of the Mohicans J. Fenimore Cooper 

Lost in the Jungle Paul du Chaillu 

Boy's Life of Roosevelt Hermann Hagedorn 

On the Trail of Washington Frederick T. Hill 

David Livingstone C. Silvester Home 

Joan of Arc Andrew Lani> 

Stories from Shakespeare Jeanie Lang 

Pilgrims Progress for Children, 

Adapted by Mary MacGregor 
Arabian Nights Adapted by Martha A. L. Lane 

With Cromwell in England and Ireland. 

H. E, Marshall 
When Dewey Came to Manila J. Otis 



48 



Boy's Life of Mark Twain Albert Bigelow Paine 

Stories of the Pilgrims Margaret Pumphreys 

Child Rhymes James Whitcomb Riley 

The Wonder of War on Land F. Robt. Wheeler 

Old, Old Tales from the Old, Old £ook, 

Nora Archibald Smith 



Pets and How to Keep Them 

Lion and Tiger Stories 

Bear Stories 

The Babyhood of Wild Beasts 

The Posy Ring 

When Mother Lets Us Help 

When Mother Lets Us Cook 

When Mother Lets Us Sew 

Child's Book of the Teeth 

The Story of Sugar 

The Story of Cotton 

The Story of Wool 

The Story of Silk 

The Story of Coal 

The Early Cave Men 

The Later Cave Men 

The Tree Dwellers 

Mother Goose Village 

Lonesomest Doll 

Mother Goose Children 

Boy Blue and His Friends 

Barty Crusoe and His Man Saturday, 

Frances Hodgson Burnett 
Adventures of OP Mistah Buzzard, 

Thornton W. Burgess 
Adventures of Bob White Thornton W. Burgess 

Pinocchio C. Collodi 

Robinson Crusoe for Children Defoe 

The Little House in the Fairy Woods, Ethel Cook Eliot 
Pussy's Class Foucher 



Frank Finn 

From tjie St. Nicholas 

From the St. Nicholas 

Georgia M. McNally 

Kate Douglas Wiggin 

Constance Johnson 

Constance Johnson 

Virginia Ralston 

H. W. Ferguson, D.D.S 

Sara Ware Bassett 

Alice Turner Curtis 

Eva Mayne 

Harriet Brown 

Elizabeth McKane 

Katharine E. Dopp 

Katharine E. Dopp 

Katherine E. Dopp 

Madge A. Bigham 

Abbie F, Brown 

M. F. Blaisdell 

M. F. Blaisdell 



49 . "~ ' -""J 

Sunbonnet Babies in Holland E. O. Grover 

The Enchanted House Edith Ogden Harrison 

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue Laura Lee Hope 
Bunny Brown on Grandpa's Farm Laura Lee Hope 
Bunny Brown Playing Circus Laura Lee Hope 

Bunny Brown and the Shetland Pony, Laura Lee Hope 
Bunny Brown at Camp Rest-awhile, Laura Lee Hope 
Bunny Brown in t,he Big Woods Laura Lee Hope 

Bunny Brown on an Auto Tour Laura Lee Hope 

The Bobbsey Twins on the Deep Blue Sea, 

Laura Lee Hope 

The Bobbsey Twins on Blueberry Island, 

Laura Lee Hope 
The Bobbsey Twins in a Great City, Laura Lee Hope 
The Bobbsey Twins at Home Laura Lee, Hope 

Six Little Bunkers at Aunt Jo 's Laura Lee Hope 

Six Little Bunkers at Cousin Tom's, Laura Lee Hope 
Six Little Bunkers at Grandma Bells, Laura Lee Hope 
Little Red Riding Hood and Other Fairy Stories, Lang 
Prince Darling and Other Fairy St,ories Lang 

The Princess on the Glass Hill and Other Fairy Stories. 

Lang 
Dick Wittington and Other Fairy Stories Lang 

The Sleeping Beauty and Other Fairy Stories Lang 
Cinderella and Other Fairy Stories Lang 

Jack the Giant Killer and Other Fairy Stories Lang 
Tales and Tags A. J. L. 

Peter and Polly in Spring Rose Lucia 

Peter and Polly in Summer Rose Lucia 

Pet,er and Polly in Autumn Rose Lucia 

Peter and Polly in Winter Rose Lucia 



50 

My Book of Ten Fables Rosalie G. Mendell 

The Riley Reader 

Moni, the Goat Boy Johanna Spyri 

Arabella and Araminta Stories Gertrude Smith 

A Child's Garden of Verses Robert Louis Stevenson 
Tommy Snooks and Other Mother Goose Rhymes, 

Wrighl 

MAGAZINES AND PERIODICALS 

Harper's Magazine 
American Magazine 
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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1919 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Oscar E. Belden, Term expires 1921 

John F. O'Dea, Chairman Term expires 1920 

Adam J. Smith, Secretary Term expires 1922 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Theodore W. King, Hadley, Mass. 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield 
schools) . 

C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet and West Hat- 
field schools). 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
S. W. Kingsley 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Term opens Jan. 5, 1920, closes March 30, 1920 
Term opens April 9, 1920, closes June 18, 1920 
Term opens Sept. 7, 1920, closes Deo. 17, 1920 



Report of School Committe 



The School Committee have had the several mat- 
ters pertaining to the schools before their attention 
during the school year. In anticipation of having the 
same high standard of instruction in the schools for 
this school year as previously, attention and consid- 
eration was given to retaining the teachers who were 
doing such excellent work. 

It was necessary to use further resources than 
had been assigned to this department and to make 
arrangements based upon the increase in another 
financial year. In so doing it was possible to retain 
the teachers who could keep the school up to the 
high standard. 

Since then the General School Fund Law has been 
passed. This furnished one thousand dollars reim- 
bursement this year. The law also provides for a 
much greater reimbursement based upon the in- 
creased salaries. 

The increase in the salaries is practically taken 
care of by this reimbursement. The appropriation of 
an amount equal to what was appropriated last year 
with the appropriation of an amount equal to the 
reimbursement would provide the resources for the 
maintenance of the schools. The appropriation of the 
two is necessary because of the increase in all items 
of school expenditure. 

The minor repairs to school buildings were made 
during the summer. The school buildings are in good 
condition, with the exception of the one at the West 
which the committee have reported as not satisfactory 
as a school building. 



Financial Statement 

For Fiscal Year Ending Dec. 31, 1919 
RESOURCES 

From State: 

Superintendent of Schools . . . $625.00 

School Fund 962.07 

General School Fund 1,030.00 

— $2,617.07 

Tuition: 

Northampton $147.00 

Town Appropriation 14,000.00 

Tickets 289.14 

Dog Fund 63.06 

EXPENDITURES 

Salaries: 

Teachers $12,044.00 

Janitors 1,964.04 

Supervisors 436.62 

Superintendent of Schools 935.60 

School Committee 65.00 

Books and Supplies 462.07 

Fuel 2,366.78 

Repairs 378.21 

Transportation 300.10 

Miscellaneous 87.18 

Total expenditures $19,037.70 



Report of the 

Superintendent of Schools 



To t;he School Committee and Citizens of the Town 

of Hatfield: 

The increase in all items of school expenditures 
may seem to demand consideration at this time, but in 
reality the principal consideration is the relation of 
this increase to effective teaching and to keeping the 
schools up to the same high standard. 

TEACHERS 

The same teachers that taught in the Center 
School last year were in their respective positions for 
this school year and it is due to that fact that flrere 
has been tjie same excellent work. The two changes 
from one school to another were based upon the spe- 
cial adaptation to the particular grade. The vacancies 
that existed in June were filled by normal graduates 
who had the training for effective teaching. 

TEACHERS' SALARIES 

The question of teachers' salaries is of as great 
concern to tjie schools as to the teachers. Although 
an increase has already been made it has not been 
any greater in proportion to other items of school 
expenditure and other costs. 

Other places have increased their salaries and 
it still leaves the same relation between towns with 
the same chance to go to better paid positions. 



57 



The increase in teachers ' salaries has to apply 
to those who are in the positions and to those who 
are newly appointed, if it is hoped to retain the 
majority of those at work and to secure teachers of 
competent ability to fill vacancies. This question is 
of too vital interest to the schools to be overlooked. 

It is quite generally understood that the number 
taking up teaching has greatly decreased and the 
increase in salaries has to be based on the supply and 
demand as well as upon the fact that increases had 
not been made in proportion to other changes. 

GENERAL SCHOOL FUND LAW 

The State realizes the importance of the pupils 
being taught by teachers of competent ability anil 
consider apparently that the State is concerned in 
this matter. With a view to having teachers with 
educational qualifications appointed in the schools the 
General School Fund Law was passed. It provides 
for the reimbursement to the town of one hundred 
dollars for every teacher who receives as salary six 
hundred and fifty dollars, one hundred and fifty dot 
lars for every teacher who receives seven hundred 
and fifty dollars, who is a graduate of an approved 
normal school or college, and has had one year's ex- 
perience, or who possesses preparation and teaching 
experience accepted in lieu thereof; two hundred dol- 
lars for every teacher who receives eight ; hundred and 
fifty dollars, who is a graduate of an approved normal 
school or college or who possesses preparation and 
teaching experience accepted in lieu thereof. 

This law establishes six hundred and fifty dollars 
as a minimum salary upon which reimbursement is 
based, and reimburses one-half of each hundred dollar 



58 

increase provided it is based upon educational quali- 
fications and experience. 

READING 

Reading is the most important work of the school, 
both in content and in developing the ability of the 
pupil. It also serves in the comprehension of the 
other studies. 

The method of teaching reading that was in use 
had not proven as effective in advancing all of the 
pupils as is possible with other methods, and it did 
not serve as a basis for advanced work in upper grades. 

The Progressive Road to Reading was adopted and 
has been in use in the first grade since the beginning 
of the school year. Special attention has been given 
to its use and the result as is evident even thus far 
proves the advantage of its use. It helps the pupil 
to make continued progress for what is learned, serves 
as a basis for further advancement. The power ac- 
quired through the phonetic drills makes the pupil 
self-reliant, is more interested in the stories and makes 
closer application. The use of the phrases improves 
the expression and indicates a clear comprehension of 
the reading matter. 

Whatever advantage a method may have it is only 
as it is well used and that the teaching is good that 
the results are secured. 

The teachers have manifest a keen interest in the 
use of the method and are entitled to the credit for the 
results and advancement already accomplished. There 
are the books for the higher grades in the same series 
which are interesting and instructive and the same 
should be provided. There are introductory books so 
the transition for one reader to another is not so great. 



59 

ATTENDANCE 

The increase in the per cent of attendance for the 
months of the fall term has been such as to make it a 
marked improvement in all tjie school. 

In reality it has been of a high standard. It has 
not been below ninety per cent in a single school for 
any month during the fall term, and several of the 
schools have had as high as ninety-eight for some of the 
months during that time. The pupils have received 
the advantage that regular attendance is to their work 
and advancement. 

Special attention is being given quite generally to 
presenting to pupils the advantages of staying in 
school after they reach the compulsory attendance 
age. It is a fact that the pupils that leave school as 
soon as they get to be fourteen years of age are the 
ones that have been absent a great deal up to that 
time. These are the pupils that really need all they 
can get from their school work. 

Therefore this matter is of sufficient importance 
tor it to receive sufficient attention for it to be thor- 
oughly understood and for regular attendance to 
apply to all pupils. 

DRAWING 

Beginning last September it was possible to secui-e 
the services of a drawing supervisor and Miss Ranlett 
was appointed. She is a graduate of the Boston Normal 
Art School and had the practice training in this work. 

The work has consisted of the teaching of the les 
sons by the supervisor and by the teachers following 
the directions. It has been very well done. Teacher* 
have found it helpful and have expressed their earnest 
approval. 



60 

It was found by the supervisor, as is stated in her 
report, that the work in drawing had been going on 
very well as taken up by the regular teachers, and it 
was possible to do much more than where there had 
been no supervision in drawing for some time. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES 

Pupils should be taught to read as well as being 
taught how to read. There should be books at hand 
for reading in addition to the regular textbook. Books 
which are of high standards of literary merit and genu- 
inely interesting to children of the different grades 
should be accessible. 

Sets of different books made up into small libraries 
of about twenty books each can be used for this pur- 
pose. After being used in one school for about a month 
the books could be taken to a different school and an- 
other set supplied. With several such small libraries 
each school can be kept supplied and each child would 
have access to several different; books each year. 

These libraries are of greater need in the two- 
room schools because of the greater number of grades 
in a room and the less time that a teacher would have 
with each separate grade. 

The arrangement for the use of books at the 
library in the Center is very helpful. 

CONCLUSION 

In conclusion I wish to praise the teachers for 
their devotion to their work and to making the teach- 
ing effective and express appreciation for their loyalty 
to the profession. I wish to express appreciation to 
the committee for their consideration of all matters of 
school interest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE W. KINO 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Work in drawing this year has been profitable 
and interesting. Although there was no supervisor 
during the previous year, the grade teachers had not 
allowed the year to be wasted. Since I have been 
teaching in your schools I have endeavored to bring 
to the pupils the best methods of teaching representa- 
tion. The fundamentals of good design and composi- 
tion, and the appreciation of beauty in nature, civic, 
and home life. I have tried to make the work of such 
a nature as to promote constructive thinking and 
develop imagination, accuracy, good workmanship, 
and self-reliance. 

Drawing is not primarily to develop artists, 
though that is of course sought, and I have found 
several students of considerable ability, it is to give 
an added means of expressing their thoughts, that is 
the picture language, which is universal. Accuracy 
a necessity to certain professions, is acquired to a 
greater degree from drawing than from any other 
subject while some other problems accent the pupil's 
ability to carry a project through to a successful con 
elusion unaided. 

One of the features of the drawing this year has 
been to correlate it to tjhe other subjects of the cur- 
riculum, thereby increasing interest in both. Another 
phase has been the construction work undertaken by 
the upper grades just before Christmas, which re- 
sulted in games and useful articles, suitable for gifts 
or for use in the home. 



62 

i wish to express my sincere thanks to the grade 
teachers and Miss Allair for their hearty co-opera- 
tion in all our undertakings, for I feel that their in- 
terest has largely served to vitalize and carry on our 
work. 

BESSIE DAVIS RANLETT, 

Supervisor of Drawing 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 



In submitting a report I will say that the course 
in music is being conducted along lines similar to 
those of former years. 

The teaching of rote songs, begun in the first and 
continued in the second and third grades, is in reality 
a presentation of subject matter. The child learns 
the use of the singing voice, tones of the scale com- 
bined with words, development of rhythm and inter- 
pretation of song. 

As the child advances in grade, subject matter 
is presented more definitely. Thorough memorizing 
of scale and chromatic tones and intervals, a knowl- 
edge of symbols represented, and development of 
rhythm enables the pupil to read at sight with good 
interpretation any song within his grade. 

During the past year we began word reading 
with simple exercises in the second and third grades 
with fairly good results. 

Great possibilities in the field of school music are 
presenting themselves each day. One feature which 
is being developed with great results is the school 
orchestra. We are now forming an orchestra and 
although we have a small number to begin with we 
hope that it will encourage the study of different in- 
struments;, for the sake of the great pleasure and 
benefit derived from any branch of music, both in 
school and home. 

We may say that with the hearty co-operation 
and faithful work of our grade teachers and the ready 
response of the school officials in furnishing necessary 
material, progress has been made in our musio course 
during the past year. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 

January 23, 1920. 



64 



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Home Address 
Hatfield 

Northampton 

Hatfield 

Northampton 

Florence 

Hatfield 

Bradstreet 

Hatfield 

Lowell 


95 

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Mary L. Allaire, Prin. 
Theresa Nolan 
Margaret A. Ryan 
Sarah V. Kiely 
Regina M. Fortsch 
Laura F. Jubinville 
Mrs. Mary B. Powers 
Hazel Powers 
Mildred Pease 
Lena H. Proulx 
Constance Breor 
Grace O'Brien 
Helen K. Breor 
Katherine Doyle 
Anna Shannon 
Catherine C. Brace 
Nellie K- Salvas 
Maude Fy. Boyle 
Bessie D. Ranlett 




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Center 

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School 

Hill Primary 

West Grammar 
West Primary 
North Grammar 
North Primary 

Bradstreet 

Supr. of Music 
Supr. of Drawing 





ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1920 



HERALD JOB PRINT 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Finance Committee 



Your Finance Committee, economizing by leaving out 
all new road construction, recommend the following appro- 
priations : — 

Eighth payment and interest, new school house 

loan $3,125.00 

Article 5 — Highways : 

Ordinary repairs, highways and bridges . r 2,500.00 

Patching, oiling and repairs stone roads . . . 4,500.00 

Article 6 — Necessary town expenses : 

Contingencies , 1,300.00 

Bonds — Town officers 100.00 

Memorial Hall— Care of 150.00 

Salaries— Town officers 2,000.00 

Poor— Care of 1,000.00 

Interest 2,000.00 

Insurance 345.00 

Inspection 200.00 

Tree Warden 200.00 

Fire Department 300.00 

Schools— Maintenance of 25,000.00 

Article 7— Memorial Day 120.00 

Article 10— Care of Cemeteries 100.00 

Article 11— Public Library 750.00 



4 

Artxle 14— School Physicians 100.00 

Article 17 — Regarding a new schoolhouse at 
West Hatfield, we advise that a sum not ex- 
ceeding in the aggregate $15,000 be raised, 
and arranged to be paid over a series of 
years; to be acted on by the voters, raised 
and appropriated this year . 5,000.00 

Articlce 18 — Hampshire Farm Bureau 150.00 

Article 19— Smith Industrial School 250.00 

Article 22— Street Lighst 4,300.00 

$53,490.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
GEORGE S. BELDEN, 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Warrant 

For Town Meeting, February 7, 1921 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Hampshire, ss. 

To L. H. Kingsley, one of the Constables of the town 
of Hatfield, in said County, Greeting : — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the town of Hatfield, qualified to vote in elections and 
town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on 
Monday, the 7th day of February, next, at ten o'clock in the 
forenoon, then and there to act on the following named ar- 
ticles, to wit : — 

Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2 — To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year : — Town Clerk ; three Selectmen ; one Assessor 
for 3 years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee for 3 
years ; one Water Commissioner for 3 years ; one Sinking 
Fund Commissioner for 3 years ; one Trustee Public Libra- 
ry for 3 years ; Auditor ; Tree Warden ; Elector under the 
Will of Oliver Smith ; Tax Collector ; Farm Bureau Direc- 
tor; six Constables; and to vote on the question — "Yes" or 
"No" — Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of certain non- 
intoxicating beverages in this town? All the foregoing to 
be voted for on one ballot. 



The Polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 
and be kept open at least four hours, and for such longer 
time as the majority of the voters present shall direct, but 
in no case shall they be kept open after the hour of eight 
o'clock in the evening. 

Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various town offi- 
cers and committees and act thereon. 



Article 4 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5 — To take action in relation to maintenance 
and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year, and 
raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising money 
and appropriating same to defray the necessary expenses 
of the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8 — To take action in relation to support of the 
poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appropriate money 
for the same. 

Article 9 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 



Article 12 — To see if the town will take a lease of Smith 
Academy buildings and grounds for the purpose of main- 
taining therein a town high school, and act anything there- 
on. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to bor- 
row money in anticipation of the revenue of the current 
financial year. 

Article 14 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the employment of one or more School 
Physicians, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will vote to increase its 
Finance Committee from the present number of three mem- 
bers to five, or to act anything in relation thereto. 

Article 16 — To see if the town will vote to employ a 
School Nurse, and raise and appropriate money for same. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will vote to build a new 
school house at West Hatfield, and raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for same, or act anything in relation thereto. 

Article 18 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for support of the Hampshire County Farm Bureau. 

Article 19 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children at- 
tending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for supplies and maintenance of the Fire Depart- 
ment. 



8 

Article 21 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for Tree Warden and Gypsy and Brown 
Tail Moth work. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum of money for Street Lights, and authorize 
the Selectmen to make a one-year contract with the Am- 
herst Gas Company. 

Article 23 — To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for purchasing a motor truck 
for highway and transportation work. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : — 

In accordance with the requirements of the Statutes of 
Massachusetts, the following report for the year ending- 
December 31, 1920, is respectfully submitted. 

STATE AID 
State Aid paid to two persons $78.00 

POOR EXPENDITURES 

City of Northampton ' $399.00 

City of Holyoke 356.25 

Chas. A. Byron, med. attce 69.00 

Farren Hospital 53.88 



$878.13 



Hampshire Co. Sanatorium 444.35 

OLD BILLS 

Wiswell, sup $4.25 

H. W. Wolfram, labor 14.00 

Belden Bros 7.00 

S. W. Kingsley, police, lab. on fence 59.25 

Foster-Farrar, sup 15.31 

P. J. Whalen, lab. tree warden, 18 and 19 293.97 

G. E. Morton, lab. on trees 12.25 

Chas. A. Byrne, poor ast 13.00 

$419.03 



10 

INSURANCE 

H. L. Howard $179.90 

Boyle & Mullins 921.60 



$1,101.50 



BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 

Boyle & Mullins, for treasurer $40.00 

Boyle & Mullins, water commissioner 12.00 

Boyle & McGlynn, collector 50.00 



$102.00 



TOWN OFFICERS 

C. E. Warner, auditor, 18 and 19 $20.00 

E. L. Graves, part salary as col. 1918 150.00 

E. L. Graves, asst. registrar 2.00 

Joseph E. Godin, ballot clerk 20.00 

Dennis E. Holley, ballot clerk 11.00 

Robert J. McGrath, ballot clerk 16.00 

Charles I. Stowell, ballot clerk 20.00 

Marian C. Billings, ballot clerk 5.00 

Mary R. McGlynn, ballot clerk . 5.00 

John W. Kiley, services selectman (1919) 150.00 

Edw. A. Breor, services selectman (1919) 75.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, services selectman (1919) .... 75.00 

John R. McGrath, assessor 180.75 

L. H. Kingsley, assessor 257.00 

John McHugh, elector, 1919 10.00 

Thos. W. Ryan, registrar of voters 25.00 

R. W. Weber, registrar of voters 25.00 



11 

L. A. Billings, registrar of voters 25.00 

L. H. Kingsley, town clerk and clerk of Board of 

Selectmen 500.00 

L. H. Kingsley, treas. and registrar of voters .... 225.00 

Peter L. Baline, sealer of weights and measures . . 100.00 

H. L. Pellam, dog officer and police duty 28.25 



$1,925.00 

ORDINARY REPAIRS— HIGHWAY AND BRIDGES 

Thos. J. Ryan, services as superintendent $756.00 

M. B. Ryan, labor 243.00 

Joseph T. Ryan, labor 31.50 

Fred T. Bardwell, labor and team 271.50 

F. G. Vollinger, labor and team 306.00 

John T. Powers, labor and team 164.00 

H. D. Smith, coal and team 31.69 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor 35.00 

M. H. Dwight, team and labor 40.00 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 56.00 

C. H. Crafts, team and labor 202.00 

Scott Harris, team and labor 14.50 

O. Belden Sons, team and labor 29.25 

Wm, H. Dickinson, team and labor 58.00 

E. A. Breor, team and labor 28.00 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor 48.00 

A. H. Strong, team and labor 16.00 

Jacob Englehardt, team and labor 16.00 

C. E. Pfuffer, team and labor 36.00 

A. L. Strong, Est., plank and posts 706.05 

E. N. Dickinson, labor 6.00 

John J. Betsold, labor 3.50 

Joseph Sadoski, labor 10.50 

Geo. P. Englehardt, labor 22.00 

J. F. Chandler, labor 10.56 



12 

G. E. Morton, labor 10.50 

John Jandinski, labor 22.50 

L. H. Wigiht, labor 8.00 

John Vachula, labor 13.50 

Chas. Filipek, labor 4.50 

H. L. Stoddard, labor 33.00 

George Zapka, labor 4.50 

John F. O'Dea, labor 8.00 

Barbara Chandler, labor 4.38 

E. W. Strong, gravel 15.00 

M. W. Boyle, common 25.00 

Thos. W. Ryan, sand 2.25 

C. I. Stowell, common 60.00 

Geo. Eberlein rep 14.50 

Wm. P. Boyle, rep 17.10 

Wm. T. Fitzgibbons, rep 8.63 

R. Mahoney, rep 6.90 

Foster-Farrar Co., sup 14.07 

P. F. O'Leary, signs 18.00 

S. E. Briggs, filing saws 1.75 



$3,433.13 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 

Theodore W. King, as superintendent $90.00 

Norman J. Bond, as superintendent 951.42 

Mary L. Allaire, as principal 655.50 

Mary B. Powers, as teacher 950.36 

Margaret A. Ryan, as teacher 910.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, as teacher 740.00 

Lena H. Proulx, as teacher 910.00 

Constance C. Breor, as teacher 730.00 

Theresa Nolan, as teacher 484.50 

Regina M. Fortsch, as teaecher . , 484.50 

Laura M. Jubinville, teacher 484.50 

Hazel Powers, teacher 484.50 



13 

Mildred Pease, teacher 484.50 

Catherine B. Brace ,teacher 864.75 

Nellie E. Salvas, teacher 864.75 

Anna Shannon, teacher 123.25 

Kate Doyle, teacher 369.00 

Grace H. O'Brien, teacher 730.00 

Helen K. Breor, teacher 769.75 

Cecile E. LaFleur, teacher 569.00 

Marion J. Hanley, teacher 35.00 

Rhena M. Horton, teacher 380.00 

M. Elizabeth Boyle, teacher 356.25 

Anna C. Murphy, teacher 380.00 

Grace W. Bardwell, teacher 400.00 

Eva M. Bridges, teacher 114.00 

Dorothy Woods, teacher '. 270.75 

Margaret P. Ryan, teacher 419.88 

Maude E. Boyle, teacher 457.04 

Mary Ryan, teacher 15.00 

Bessie D. Ranlett, teacher 144.00 

Margaret Lovett, teacher 5.00 

Marian C. Billings, teacher 130.00 

Lina K. Billings, teacher 27.50 

Mrs. Marion Belden, teacher 5.00 

Frank Brehm, janitor 1,063.80 

Geo. D. Kingsley, janitor 334.60 

John Salvas, janitor 271.80 

John T. Slattery, janitor 367.66 

Howard Wolfram, janitor 78.00 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor 179.20 

Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., tickets 242.50 

H. D. Smith, coal and wood 1,821.31 

Teachers' Retirement Board 541.25 

H. W. Wolfram, coal and rep 636.95 

John F. O'Deae, labor 38.33 

Adam J. Smith, labor 45.00 

O. Belden & Son, sewer 26.00 



14 

Bernice N. Cutter, census, 19.00 

John J. Betsold, wood 25.00 

Fred G. Howard, sup 31.87 

Wm. P. Boyle, rep 184.00 

Geo. Eberlein, rep 5.65 

N. Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co 34.65 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co 12.00 

Phelps & Gare, clock 1.50 

S. W. Kingsley, rep 3.50 

Empire New Eng. Co., books 39.50 

Clarence Hawkes, books 13.15 

Henry K. White, sup 6.75 

Arthur S. Wood, clock 2.50 

Consolidated Dry Goods Co 3.15 

S. H. Field, stone 10.00 

A. F. Foote, ins. boiler 2.00 

John C. Winston Co., books 12.65 

Little, Brown & Co., books 316.01 

D. C. Heath & Co., books 364.75 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, books 259.36 

J. L. Hammett Co., books 990.92 

American Book Co., books 54.60 

Benjamin Sanborn & Co., books 124.44 

Milton Bradley Co., books 210.00 

Houghton, Mifflin Co., books 5.91 

Ginn & Co., books 29.88 

W. H. Riley & Co., rep 20.59 

Foster-Farrar Co., sup 16.37 

B. & M. Rd. ft 13.17 

Favr, Rhul & Co., book 64.01 

E. E. Babb & Co., books 71.25 

Am. Gas. Co., light 14.51 

J. W. Heffernan, sup 74.26 

W. T. Fitzgibbons, rep 9.29 

Masnew-Young Co., sup 35.80 

D. Appleton & Co., sup 28.42 



15 

Lyons & Carnahan, sup 24.27 

Silver, Burdette & Co., sup 1.02 

Smith Academy, tuition 1,000.00 



$25,571.80 



VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY 

F. H. Bardwell, Treasurer $100.00 

CARE MEMORIAL HALL 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor $75.00 

CONTINGENCIES 

John H. Day, Town Hall chairs $12.50 

H. D. Smith, coal Town Hall 53.38 

Herald Job Print, reports and printing 351.50 

Geo. Eberlein, rep. Town Hall 2.00 

H. L. Pellam, care Town Hall 108.75 

C. T. Bagnall, tax bills 13.58 

W. & L. E. Gurley, sealer sup 12.79 

A. J. Bonneville, fumigation and reg. births 28.00 

F. G. Vollingus, trans, assessors 5.00 

Wm. C. Kingsley, trans, reg. voters 9.00 

W. L. Stevens, ex. at Boston 46.53 

Chas. A. Byron, reg. births 18.00 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks 16.31 

L. H. Kingsley, reed, births, mar. and deaths 131.50 

L. H. Kingsley, serving warrants, sup., etc 49.61 

First Parish, rep. sheds 25.00 

Auto List Co., list of autos 5.00 

New Eng. Tel & Tel. Co., telephone 19.46 

P. R. Mullany, post, town reports, envelopes 26.43 

E. E. Davis, survey road 46.80 

H. S. Gere & Son, sealer ad .50 



16 

Johnson's Bookstore, coll. book 2.00 

P. H. Chew, jntge book 15.50 

C. I. Stowell, Wilkin plot 4.00 

John W. Moran, rep. clock face 110.00 

Carter Ink Co., record ink 2.75 

Fred G. Howard, sup 2.80 

Fred W. Schepp, rep. Town Hall 52.50 

Amherst Gas Co., Town Hall 22.95 

C. H. Chase, transfers 9.15 



$1,203.29 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Sherwood Co., books $383.36 

A. R. Worwrath, books 6.07 

Peter L. Balise, labor 1.25 

Kate Wells, cleaning 1.75 

Am. Gas Co., lights 21.65 

Libraryi Boow House, books . . 22.21 

Gaylord Bros., books 6.15 

Carrie C. Cutter, magazines 40.40 

Library Bureau, sup 13.74 

Ellen A. Waite, librarian 200.00 

Margaret P. Ryan, assistant librarian . 47.40 



$743.98 

SMITH AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 
Tuition $331.47 

MEMORIAL DAY 
C. K. Morton $124.00 



17 

NEW STEAM ROLLER 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co $4,358.80 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS AND SLAUGHTERING 

Fred T. Bardwell $115.20 

E. S. Warner 256.50 



$371.70 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Chas. A. Byron $50.00 

A. J. Bonneville 50.00 



$100.00 



PATCHING AND OILING STONE ROADS 

Thos. J. Ryan, supt $429.00 

M. B. Ryan, labor . 285.75 

H. L. Stoddard, labor 252.00 

Frank Borowski, labor 58.50 

George Zapka, labor 130.50 

Paul Urgulwicz, labor 159.75 

John Holich, labor 78.75 

John Jandinski, labor 81.00 

Stanley Chowniski, labor 18.00 

B. & M. Rd., freight 157.90 

John T. Powers, team and labor 472.00 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 384.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team and labor 6.00 

John S. Lane & Son, stone 81.07 

The Barrett Co., K. P. and oil 2,202.60 

$4,796.82 



18 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

J. F. O'Dea, runners on hose wagons $8.00 

M. J. Ryan, salary fire chief 100.00 

Fred Wentzel, labor and hose wagon 13.00 

John J. Betsold, hose wagon 5.00 

Thos. M. Day, hose wagon 5.00 

H. W. Marsh, hose wagon 5.00 

Kate Mullins, hose wagon 5.00 

C. H. Crafts, hose wagon 5.00 



$146.00 

STREET LIGHTS 
Amherst Gas Company $4,257.59 

DEPOT ROAD. 

Thos. J. Ryan, supt. . $180.00 

M. B. Ryan, labor 121.50 

Jos. T. Ryan, labor 29.25 

H. L. Stoddard, labor . . 165.00 

Paul Urgulwicz, labor 112.50 

John Jandinski, labor 99.00 

Stanley Choineski, labor 36.00 

George Zapka, labor 99.00 

John Fusek, labor 76.50 

Eddie Olenski, labor 13.50 

Joseph Dombrowski, labor 13.50 

Charles Filipek, labor 18.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team 8.00 

John T. Powers, teeam 196.00 

John L. Boyle, team 272.00 

H. D. Smith, coal 2.65 

R. E. Donalson, stone 41.00 

S. W. Kingsley, sand 19.65 

New Eng. Metal Culvert Co 265.05 



19 

Webster Box Co., sup V. ... 20.83 

Benj. Bernstein, rep 4.65 

Kimball & Cary, coal ." 78.45 

The Barrett Co., tarvia X 417.60 

J. S. Lane & Co., stone . 899.93 



$3,189.56 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY FARM BUREAU 

Farm Bureau, treas $150.00 

CEMENT WALK 
W. C. Tannatt, Jr .$1,584.20 

BRADSTREET STONE ROAD 

Thos. J. Ryan, supt " $384.00 

M. B. Ryan, labor 297.00 

Joseph T. Ryan, labor 222.75 

George Zapka, labor 211.50 

Stanley Choineski, labor 31.50 

Ignace Berneski, labor 31.50 

John Jandinski, labor 157.50 

Paul Urgulwicz, labor 31.50 

H. L. Stoddard, labor 351.00 

Walter Mileski, labor 18.00 

H. Lebmowski, labor 22.50 

Walter Socolowski, labor 18.00 

Eddie Olenski, labor 31.50 

John Fusek, labor 18.00 

Paul Cernak, labor 4.50 

Frank Podriadis, labor 11.25 

Chas. Filipek, labor 130.50 

John Vachula, labor 45.00 

Joseph Dombrowski, labor 54.00 



20 

John T. Powers, labor and team 464.00 

John L. Boyle, labor and team 304.00 

Archie P. Graves, labor and team 79.00 

L. H. Wigiht, labor and team 96.00 

Joseph F. Chandler, labor and team 8.00 

James Mullins, labor and team 176.00 

J. F. O'Dea, labor and team . 80.00 

Scott Harris, labor and team 28.00 

C. H. Crafts, labor and team 32.00 

Geo. Whitcomb, oil 14.00 

Northampton Iron Works, C. basins 153.00 

Waldo Bros., tools 5.92 

Wm. S. Murphy, labor 24.00 

Foster-Farrar Co., sup 3.40 

Kimball Cary Co., coal 77.25 

Webster Box Co., cement 18.00 

F. G. Howard, sup 6.35 

Henry Goodbur, bound stone 6.25 

B. & M. Rd, freight 295,63 

E. N. Dickinson, gravel 8.55 

M. T. Brennan, gravel 41.10 

Geo. Eberlein, rep 2.85 

The Barrett Co., tarvia X 1,664.85 

John S. Lane & Son, stone 4,442.23 



$10,101.88 

VALLEY ROAD 

Thomas J. Ryan, supt $78.00 

M. B. Ryan, labor 54.00 

Joseph T. Ryan, labor 42.75 

H. L. Stoddard, labor 18.00 

George Zapka, labor 22.50 

Charles Filipek, labor 45.00 

John Jandanski, labor 36.00 

John T. Powers, labor and team 96.00 



21 

John L. Boyle, labor and team 60.00 

Alex Koyash, labor and team 52.00 

Thos. M. Day, labor and team 32.00 

Wm, H. Dickinson, labor and team 29.60 

Ernest Godin, labor and team 68.00 

P. T. Boyle, labor and team 44.00 

John Vachula, labor and team 4.50 

John F. O'Dea, sand 10.65 

J. S. Lane & Son, stone 261.75 

N. Y., N. H. & H. Rd., freight 311.81 



$1,266.56 

TREE WARDEN 

Thomas J. Ryan, supt $12.00 

M. B. Ryan, labor 9.00 

J. T. Powers, team 8.00 

Michael Dulaski, labor 4.00 



$33.00 

RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN— 1920 

State Aid $78.00 

Old Bills 419.03 

Insurance 1,101.50 

Bonds — Town officers 102.00 

Town Officers 1,925.00 

Ord. Repairs, Highways 3,433.13 

School— Maintenance 24,571.80 

Hampshire Co. Sanatorium 444.35 

School Physicians 100.00 

Contingencies 1,203.29 

Public Library 743.98 

Memorial Day 124.00 

New Steam Roller 4,358.80 

Inspection of Animals 371.70 



22 

Care of Poor 878.13 

Repairs, patching, oil, — roads 4,796.82 

Fire Dept 146.00 

Street Lights \ 4,257.59 

Farm Bureau 150.00 

Depot Road 3,189.56 

Bradstreet Road 10,101.88 

Smith Ag'l School 331.47 

Cement Walk 1,584.20 

Valley Road 1,266.56 

Smith Academy 1,000.00 

V. I. Society 100.00 

Care Memorial Hall 75.00 

Tree Warden 33.00 

Total $66,886.79 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. H. DICKINSON, 
E. A. BREOR, 
SCOTT HARRIS, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



I have this day examined the books of the Selectmen, 
and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 
Jan. 7th, 1921. 



23 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT- 
MEN OF HATFIELD—1921 



Balise, Paul N„ 
Bardwell, Fred T., 
Billings, Roswell G., 
Betsold, Frank L., 
Burke, William H. 
Crafts, Caryll M., 
Dickinson, William H., 
Dickinson, Edward N., 
Field, Sam'l H., 
Graves, Murray B., 
Day, Edward J., 
Howard, Harry L., 
Howard, Fred G., 
Kiley, John W., 
McGrath, Robert J., 2nd, 
Proulx, Leon R., 
Mullins, John W., 
Morton, Gilbert E., 
Marsh, Harry W., 
Sheehan, John L., 
Sheehan, Daniel P., 
Slattery, Charles F., 
Strong, Edson W., 
Smith, Herbert D., 
Smith, Adam J., 
Ryan, Edward A., 
Ryan, Matthew J., 
Wight, Leland H., 



Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Insurance 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in Account with the Town of 

Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To Balance in Treasury $4,291.78 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1918) 1,418.93 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1919) 16,147.04 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll (1920) 46,944.17 

Treasurer, Water Commissioners 2,900.00 

District Court fines 93.00 

Pool and Slaughter licenses 9.00 

Junk and State licenses 53.00 

Sealer's receipts 60.60 

Rent of Town Hall, janitor 165.00 

Sale of school tickets 298.27 

Camp Thompson, tel. bill 19.46 

John L. Boyle, bal. of tile 16.00 

S. A. Basket Ball, rep. Town Hall 9.35 

Paul Zima, cem. plot .50 

Albert P. Watson, cem. plot .50 

Louis A. Webber, cem. plot .50 

Roswell G. Billings, cem. plot .50 

Reuben F. Wells, cem. plot .50 

Fred G. Howard, cem. plot .50 

A. F. Bardwell, cem. plot .50 

Paul Duga, cem. plot .50 

V. H. Keller, cem. plot .50 

John Jablonski, sewer entrance 33.00 

Am. Sumatra Tob. Co., sewer entrance 33.00 

H. D. Smith, sewer entrance 33.00 



26 

P. J. Whalen, sewer entrance 33.00 

Ernest Godin, sewer entrance 33.00 

P. T. Boyle, sewer entrance 33.00 

Town of Whately, tuition 253.00 

County Treasurer, dog fund 59.62 

State— Mass. School Fund 1,310.52 

Inspection of animals 77.75 

Income Tax, Gen'l School Fund 2,800.00 

Supt. of School Union 525.78 

Highway Corns., Chap. 155 436.78 

Corporation Tax 502.06 

National Bank Tax 809.07 

Income Tax 4,357.23 

Highway Corns., Bradstreet Rd 5,000.00 

Vocational Trust Fund 98.04 

State Aid 144.00 

Interest on Deposits 314.09 

Cash from Temporary Loans : — 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 1, 23,987.99 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 2 24,254.69 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 3 24,387.57 72,630.25 



$161,946.29 
Cr. 

By cash paid Selectmen's orders $66,886.79 

Interest on Water Bonds 2,000.00 

District Court Fees 99.82 

Director of Accounts 6.00 

County Tax 4,240.10 

State Tax 6,300.00 

Special Tax 297.00 

Highway Tax 708.00 

Soldiers' Exemption 4.34 

Civilian War Poll Tax 1,893.00 



26 

Treasurer Sinking Fund 918.00 

Balance in Treasury 2,378.24 

By cash paid outstanding Notes : — 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 59 8,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 57 15,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 1 25,000.00 

S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 2 25,000.00 

7th Note and Interest— New Schoolhouse 3,215.00 

$161,946.29 



IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1918 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received $1,418.93 

Uncollected taxes 703.58 $2,122.51 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes $2,016.69 

Interest collected 105.82 2,122.51 

(1919 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received $16,147.04 

Uncollected taxes 1,672.45 17,819.49 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes $17,514.69 

Interest collected 304.80 17,819.49 



27 

(1920 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received $46,944.17 

Uncollected taxes 22,039.35 68,983.52 

Cr. 

By Assessors' Warrant $68,841.26 

Addition to Warrant 64.67 

Interest collected 77.59 68,983.52 

I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector, and 
find that he has been credited by the Treasurer with the 
amounts of $1,418.93 of the taxes of 1918, $16,147.04 of the 
taxes of 1919, and $46,944.17 of the taxes of 1920. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 

January 7, 1921. 



WATER SINKING FUND 

To thirty years four per cent Water Bonds $50,000.00 

By Sinking Fund 31,076.67 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

To S. N. Bond & Co., Note No. 3 $25,000.00 

Bills payable and due on side- 
walk contract 1,244.90 

Due Smith Academy 1,000.00 27,244.90 



28 
Cr. 

By uncollected taxes (1918) . 703.58 

Uncollected taxes (1919) 1,672.45 

Uncollected taxes (1920) 22,039.35 

Due from State Aid 78.00 

State— Smith Schol 165.73 

State Subsidy 188.55 

Bills due 100.00 

Balance in Treasury 2,378.24 27,325.90 



Balance in favor of the Town, $81.00 

Respectfully, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Treasurer. 



I have examined the books and accounts of the Treas- 
urer of the Town of Hatfield for the year ending December 
31, 1920, and find them correct. I find Selectmen's orders 
on file to the amount of Sixty-six thousand, eight hundred 
eighty-six dollars, and seventy-nine cents, ($66,886.79), 
with evidence of their payment by him, also, cancelled notes 
and receipts for County and State Taxes, and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of Two thousand, three 
hundred and seventy-eight dollars and twenty-four cents, 

($2,378.24). 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 
January 7, 1921. 



29 

PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY FUNDS 



Fund Inc. '20 


Exp. '20 


Bal. '20 


H. W. Smith, $12.00 


$10.00 


$30.38 


Augusta Wells, 14.71 


10.00 


347.76 


Oliver Warner, 2.15 


2.00 


50.34 


J. H. Sanderson, 4.34 


4.00 


102.30 


Luman M. Moore, 9.14 


8.00 


214.72 


Abby Dickinson, 3.96 


3.50 


93.15 


Lucy L. Morton, 10.10 


4.00 


241.53 


Charles Smith, 4.47 


4.00 


105.27 


L. B. Field, 4.47 


4.00 


104.86 


Rufus H. Cowles, 4.61 


4.00 


106.14 


C. E. Hubbard, 4.68 


4.00 


109.76 


Alpheus Cowles, 4.38 


4.00 


103.20 


James Porter, 4.33 


4.00 


101.72 


Daniel W. Allis, 6.57 


5.00 


155.16 


J. H. Howard, 4.30 


4.00 


100.68 


Fannie M. Burke, 4.38 


4.00 


102.50 


C. S. Shattuck, 6.38 


4.00 


102.38 


S. W. Kingsley, 




100.00 


E. S. Warner, 




200.00 


Reuben Belden, 




100.00 


Edward C. Billings, 25.00 


25.00 


500.00 


C. G. Wilkin, for Library, 




1,938.13 



REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

We have the following amounts deposited to the credit 
of the Sinking Fund: — 

Haydenville Savings Bank $1,663.10 

Easthampton Savings Bank 1,044.11 

Northampton Institution for Savings 943.46 

Amherst Savings Bank 158.00 

Nonotuck Savings Bank 1,685.36 



30 

Union Trust Co., Springfield 2,890.93 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank 1,336.94 

Springfield Institution for Savings 1,317.04 

Florence Savings Bank 1,078.91 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Holyoke 1,418.82 

Springfield St. Railway Bonds 1,000.00 

B. & M. R. R. Bonds 3,000.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Bonds 2,000.00 

U. S. Liberty Bonds , 2,000.00 

U. S. Victory Bonds 2,000.00 

Town of Hatfield Water Bonds 7,000.00 

B. & M. R. R. Co., Coupons 540.00 



$31,076.67 



M. J. RYAN, 

JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

ERCENT E. GODIN, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the vouchers and securities of 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 
January 14, 1921. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for the 
year 1920 are as follows : — 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 

No. Males Females 

January, 10 6 4 

February 7 3 4 

March 8 5 3 

April 11 8 3 

May 5 1 4 

June I 7 5 2 

July 4 3 1 

August 6 2 4 

September 11 4 7 

October 5 2 3 

November 3 1 2 

December 7 7 



84 40 

BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 

Father 

Born in United States 16 

Born in Poland 56 

Born in Austro-Hungary 3 

Born in Canada 1 

Born in Czecho-Slovakia 6 

Born in Newfoundland 1 

Born in Scotland 

83 



44 



Mother 
19 

54 
4 

6 

1 



84 



32 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



15 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


92 


122 


101 


90 


98 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

January 

February . . 1 

March 

April 3 

May 

June 1 

July 1 

August 2 

September 

October 1 

November 7 

December 1 

17 

First marriage of both parties 12 

Second of groom, first of bride . 3 

Second of groom, second of bride 2 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 43 and 23 years of 
age, respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 40 and 17 years of age, 
respectively. 



33 

BIRTHPLACES OF PERSONS MARRIED 

Groom Bride 

Born in the United States 11 13 

Born in Poland 5 3 

Born in Czecho-Slovakia 1 1 



17 17 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


38 


29 


28 


14 


26 



DEATHS BY MONTHS 

No. Males Females 

January 3 

February 1 

March 5 

April . 2 

May 

June 2 

July i 

August 1 

September 4 

October 1 

November 3 

December 3 

26 13 13 






3 


1 





1 


4 


1 


1 








1 


1 


1 





1 





3 


1 


1 





2 


1 


1 


2 



34 

No. 

Under 1 year of age 13 

Between 1 and 10 years 

Between 10 and 20 years 

Between 20 and 30 years 1 

Between 30 and 40 years 3 

Between 40 and 50 years 1 

Between 50 and 60 years 2 

Between 60 and 70 years 1 

Between 70 and 80 years 3 

Between 80 and 90 years 1 

Between 90 and 100 years .... 1 



Males 


Females 


8 


5 

















1 


1 


2 


1 








2 





1 


2 


1 





1 


1 






26 13 13 

AGE OF OLDEST PERSON DECEASED 
(Male) 92 years, 5 months, 11 days. 

NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 

Chester Kugler Delia T. Healey 

John Warkiewicz Mary C. Saloas 

George C. Zwigaitis Thurville Dugal 

John Duga Cornelius Murphy 

Joseph Szarmette Martha D. Graves 

Mary Rose Balin Alfred E. Breor 

Margaret Louise Shea Sarah R. Wright 

Elizabeth Zima Louis Murry 

Ruth E. Billings Susan H. Graves 

George Pasek Chester M. Barton 

Edith Niquette William O. Graves 

Henry E. Bardwell Frank E. Bardwell 



35 

DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending 
November 30, 1920, with the receipts and settlements of the 
account with the Treasurer, is as follows: — 

85 Male dogs at $2.00 each $170.00 

5 Female dogs at $5.00 each 25.00 

$195.00 
Less fees, 90 dogs at 20 cents each 18.00 

Paid to County Treasurer $177.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Town Clerk. 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed personal estate $448,036 

Value of assessed real estate 1,984,789 

Total value of assessed estate, $2,432,825 

Value of assessed buildings $1,011,413 

Value of assessed land 973,376 

$1,984,789 

Number of polls assessed 631 

Residents assessed on property 423 

Non-residents assessed on property 70 

Number of persons assessed on property 493 

For poll tax only 317 

Rate of tax per $1,000 $27 

Number of horses assessed 420 

Number of cows 237 

Number of neat cattle 41 

Number of fowls 140 

Number of dwelling houses 431 

Acres of land 9,218 

State tax $6,300.00 

State highway tax 708.00 

State special tax 297.00 

County tax 4,240.10 

Town tax 54,524.00 

Overlayings 2,772.16 



$68,841.26 



37 

Estimated bank and corporation tax $1,000.00 

State income tax 4,000.00 

Addition to warrant 64.67 

Value of property exempt from taxation under 
Chapter 409, Acts of 1909 : 

Literary institutions 71,036.00 

Church property $46,200.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 
H. E. GRAVES, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



Report of Library Trustees 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The report of the librarian, covering the work of the 
library for the past year is herewith submitted. 

MARGARET A. MULLANY, 
PETER L. BALISE, 

Library Trustees. 



Report of the Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library: 

During the year 1920, 373 books have been added to 
the library, 215 for adults and 158 in the juvenile depart- 
ment. The circulation of books and magazines during the 
year has been 5352 in the juvenile department and 4213 in 
the adult, a total circulation of 9565. 

I hope that the community will make more use of the 
library during the coming year, and that our circulation 
may be materially increased. Now it averages between three 
and four books to each inhabitant of the town. In a neigh- 
boring city the average is ten books. 

Books have been circulated in Bradstreet, West Hat- 
field and North Hatfield as usual, in charge of Mrs. Laura 
Belden, Miss Carrie Cutter and Mr. G. H. Danforth. 

Miss Margaret P. Ryan assists Tuesday afternoons and 
Saturday evenings. 

The library is open on Tuesdays from 3 to 5 P. M. and 
on Saturdays from 3 to 5 P. M. and 7 to 9 P. M. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

Balance from fines of 1919, 
Fines of 1920, 
Sale of old papers, 


$4.88 

16.00 

3.92 



$24.80 



40 



Postage, express, supplies, 


$10.08 


Books, 


14.16 




$24.24 


Balance on hand, 


.56 


ELLEN A. WAITE, 




Librarian. 


BOOKS ENTERED DURING 1920 


Fiction 


Wanted : A Husband 


Sam'l Hopkins Adams 


The Unspeakable Perk 


Sam'l Hopkins Adams 


The Cross of Fire 


Robert G. Anderson 


Lightnin' 


Frank Bacon 


The Trumpeter Swan 


Temple Bailey 


Ruth of the U. S. A. 


Edwin Balmer 


A Wild Goose Chase 


Edwin Balmer 


The Bargain True 


Nalbro Bartley 


Paradise Auction 


Nalbro Bartley 


The Wall Between 


Sara W T are Bassett 


Partners of the Out Trail 


Harold Bindloss 


Up, the Rebels 


G. A. Birmingham 


The Winds of Chance 


Rex Beach 


The Great Desire 


Alexander Black 


The Fortieth Door 


Mary Hastings Bradley 


The Gringos 


B. M. Bower 


Jane Eyre 


Charlotte Bronte 


That Affair at St. Peters 


Edna A. Brown 


Marriage While You Wait 


J. E. Buckrose 


A Pagan of the Hills 


Charles Neville Buck 


The Tempering 


Charles Neville Buck 


The Matchmakers 


J. E. Buckrose 



41 



Tarzan of the Apes 

The Return of Tarzan 

The Branding Iron 

Hidden Creek 

The Escape of Mr. Trimm 

Simon 

Sunny Ducrow 

The Threshold 

The Clutch of Circumstance 

Bambi 

The Giirl Who Lived in the Woods 

The Crimson Alibi 

The Vindication 

Joyce of the North Woods 

The Land They Loved 

Some of us are Married 

Back to God's Country 

Kazan 

Baree, son of Kazan 

Philip Steel 

The Courage of Marge O'Doone 

The Valley of Silent Men 

All Wool Morrison 

The Little House 

An Old Chester Secret 

The Top of the World 

The Farmer of Roaring Run 

Whispers 

Hands Off 

The Man from Ashaluna 

The Foolish Lovers 

The Money Moon 

Black Bartlemy's Treasure 

The Fur Bringers 

Erskine Dale, pioneer 

Youth in Harley 



Edgar Rice Burroughs 

Edgar Rice Burroughs 

Katherine Newlin Burt 

Katherine Newlin Burt 

Irvin S. Cobb 

J. Storer Clouston 

Henry St. John Cooper 

Marjorie Benton Cooke 

Marjorie Benton Cooke 

Marjorie Benton Cooke 

Marjorie Benton Cooke 

Octavus Roy Cohen 

Harriet T. Comstock 

Harriet T. Comstock 

G. D. Cummins 

Mary Stewart Cutting 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

Holman Day 

Coningsby Dawson 

Margaret Deland 

Ethel M. Dell 

Mary Dillon 

Louis Dodge 

Beulah Marie Dix 

Henry Payson Dowst 

St. John E. Ervine 

JefFery Farnol 

Jeffery Farnol 

Hurlbert Footner 

John Fox, Jr. 

G. H. Gerould 



42 



Judith of Blue Lake Ranch 

The Joyous Troublemaker 

Six Feet Four 

The Mysterious Rider 

Heritage of the Desert 

Riders of the Purple Sage 

Desert Gold 

The Man of the Forest 

Midnight of the Ranges 

The Man Nobody Knew 

The Melwood Mystery 

Mrs. Marsden 

The Way Out 

The Man from Tall Timber 

A Mysterious Disappearance 

The House Around the Corner 

Leave it to Doris 

The Thirteenth Commandment 

Loudwater Mystery 

The House of Whispers 

The Mystery in the Ritzmore 

The Wings of Youth 

The Golden Block 

The Thread of Flame 

Overland Red 

Lost Farm Camp 

The Ridin' Kid from Powder River 

Stephen March's Way 

Kindred of the Dust 

Love Time in Picardy 

The Man with the Lamp 

The Chinese Coat 

Main Street 

Free Air 

The Mystery of the Yellow Room 

The White Cipher 



Jackson Gregory 
Jackson Gregory 
Jackson Gregory 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
Zane Grey 
George Gilbert 
Holworthy Hall 
James Hay, Jr. 
Robert Hichens 
Emerson Hough 
Thorn. K. Holmes 
Gordon Holmes 
Gorden Holmes 
Ethel Hueston 
Rupert Hughes 
Edgar Jepson 
William Johnston 
William Johnston 
Elizabeth Jordan 
Sophie Ken- 
Basil King 
Henry Herbert Knibbs 
Henry Herbert Knibbs 
Henry Herbert Knibbs 
Henry Herbert Knibbs 
Peter Kyne 
W^m. Addison Lathrop 
Janet Laing 
Jeannette Lee 
Sinclair Lewis 
Sinclair Lewis 
Gaston Leroux 
Henry Leverage 



43 



The Portygee 

Mary Gusla 

The House of Baltazar 

The Witness 

The Best Man 

The Girl, a Horse and a Dog 

Winning the Wilderness 

A Fool and His Money 

Sherry 

The Alternative 

The Exploits of Bilge and Ma 

The Man with Three Names 

Pidgin Island 

The Yellow Typhoon 

Poor Relations 

Mildew Manse 

Sir Henry 

The Honor of the Clintons 

The Worldlings 

Kathleen 

Harriet and the Piper 

The Purple Heights 

A Woman Named Smith 

Slippy McGee 

Stafford's Island 

The Wicked Marquis 

The Great Impersonation 

A Maker of History 

Lord Tony's Wife 

The Man in Gray 

From Now On 

Further Adventures of Jimmy 

The Miracle Man 

No Defense 

Miser's Money 

Mary, Marie 



Joseph C. Lincoln 

Joseph C. Lincoln 

Wm. J. Locke 

Grace L. H. Lutz 

Grace L. H. Lutz 

Francis Lynde 

Margaret Hill McCarter 

Geo. Barr McCutcheon 

Geo. Barr McCutcheon 

Geo. Barr McCutcheon 

Peter Clark McFarlane 

Harold MacGrath 

Harold MacGrath 

Harold McGrath 

Compton Mackenzie 

Belle K. Maniates 

Archibald Marshall 

Archibald Marshall 

Leonard Merrick 

Christopher Morley 

Kathleen Norris 

Marie Conway Oemler 

Marie Conway Oemler 

Marie Conway Oemler 

Florence Olmstead 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

Baroness Orczy 

Baroness Orczy 

Frank L. Packard 

Dale Frank L. Packard 

Frank L. Packard 

Sir Gilbert Parker 

Eden Phillpotts 

Eleanor H. Porter 



44 



A Man Four Square 

Wyoming 

The Dream Doctor 

The Lonely Stronghold 

Under the Country Sky 

The Twenty-fourth of June 

Red Pepper Burns 

The Light Above the Crossroads 

The Poor Wise Man 

Duds 

A Land Girl's Love Story 

Ivanhoe 

Poor Man's Rock 

"Firebrand" Trevison 

Basil Everman 

The Adventurous Lady 

The Sailor 

Rebecca's Promise 

The Man who Couldn't Sleep 

Ramsey Milholland 

Barbara of Baltimore 

Cecilia of the Pink Roses 

Bruce of Circle A 

Joanna Builds a Nest 

The Middle Passasge 

Number Seventeen 

The Bartlett Mystery 

The Silent Barrier 

The Soul of Susan Yellam 

Peace of Roaring River 

Fairfax and his Pride 

Growing Up 

Harvest 

Helena 

An American Family 

Jeremy 



Wm. McLeod Raine 

Wm. McLeod Raine 

Arthur B. Reeves 

Mrs. Baillie Reynolds 

Grace S. Richmond 

Grace S. Richmond 

Grace S. Richmond 

Mrs. Victor Rickard 

Mary Roberts Rinehart 

Henry C. Rowland 

Berta Ruck 

Sir Walter Scott 

Bertrand W. Sinclair 

Charles Alden Seltzer 

Elsie Singmaster 

J. C. Snaith 

J. C. Snaith 

Frances R. Sterrett 

Arthur Stringer 

Booth Tarkington 

Katherine H. Taylor 

Katherine H. Taylor 

Harold Titus 

Juliet Wilbor Tompkins 

L. Frank Tooker 

Louis Tracy 

Louis Tracy 

Louis Tracy 

Horace A. Vachell 

George Van Schaick 

Marie Van Vorst 

Mary Heaton Vorse 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

Henry Kitchell Webster 

Hugh Walpole 



45 



Wang the Ninth 

Faulkner's Folly 

The Soul of a Bishop 

Mary Minds Her Business 

The Age of Innocence 

The Call of the North 

The Westerner 

The Forbidden Trail 

The Great Accident 

The Second Latchkey C. 

A Damsel in Distress 

The Winning of Barbara Worth 



Putnam Weale 

Carolyn Wells 

H. G. Wells 

George Weston 

Edith Wharton 

Stewart Edward White 

Stewart Edward White 

Honore Willise 

Ben Ames Williams 

N. and A. M. Williamson 

P. G. Wodehouse 

Harold Bell Wright 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Theodore Roosevelt Wm. Roscoe Thayer 

Robert E. Lee and the Southern Confederacy 

A Labrador Doctor Wilfred T. Grenfell 

Life of Leonard Wood John G. Holme (presented) 

Leonard Wood on National issues (presented) 

Have Faith in Massachusetts Calvin Coolidge 

Life of Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson Nellie V. Sanchez 

The Graves Family John Card Graves (presented) 

Alexander Hamilton Henry Jones Ford 

Andrew Carnegie, an autobiography 

Abraham Lincoln, a play John Drinkwater 

The Americanization of Edward Bok, autobiography 



Buffalo Bill's Life Story 
Now it can be told 
'That Damn Y" 
War in the Garden of Eden 
Story of the Great War 
The Battle of the Nations 
Fighting the Flying Circus 
Seven Years in Vienna 
Caught by the Turks 



W. F. Cody 

Philip Gibbs 

Katherine Mayo 

Kermit Roosevelt 

Roland G. Usher 

Frederick A. Kummer 

Edward Rickenbacker 

Francis Yeats Brown 



46 

Tales from a Dugout Arthur Guy Empey 

High Adventure James Norman Hall 

Winged Warfare Maj. W. A. Bishop 

Old Virginia and her Neighbors, 2 vols. John Fiske 

Up the Mazaruni for Diamonds Wm. J. La Varre 

Cuba Past and Present A. Hyatt Verrill 

Ireland and England Edward R. Turner (presented) 

The Glories of Ireland 

Joseph Dunn and P. J. Lennox (presented) 
An Era of Progress and Promise (The Negro) 

W. N. Hartshorn (presented) 
The Women who Came in the Maj^flower 
Presidents and Pies Mrs. Larz Anderson 

Our Neighborhood — Good citizenship John F. Smith 

Alaska Man's Luck Hjalmar Rutzebeck 

Roaming through the West Indies Harry A. Franck 

Bradford's History of Plymouth from the original manu- 
script 
A Straight Deal or the Ancient Grudge Owen Wister 

JUVENILE DEPARTMENT 

The Free Rangers Joseph A. Altsheler 

The Scouts of the Valley Joseph A. Altsheler 

The Riflemen of the Ohio Joseph A. Altsheler 

The Rulers of the Lake Joseph A. Altsheler 

The Hunters of the Hills Joseph A. Altsheler 

The Texan Scouts Joseph A. Altsheler 

The Keeper of the Trail Joseph A. Altsheler 

The Forest Runners Joseph A. Altsheler 

The Lost Dirigible Ralph Henry Barbour 

Left-end Edwards Ralph Henry Barbour 

Sailing the Seas James Baldwin 

Short Stories from American History Blaisdell & Ball 

Forest Castaways Frederick Orin Bartlett 

Bob Thorpe, Sky Fighter Austin Bishop 



47 



True Story of the United States E. S. Brooks 

Two College Girls Helen Dawes Brown 

Little Miss Phoebe Gay Helen Dawes Brown 

Our Beginnings in Europe and America Burnham 

The Spy James Fennimore Cooper 

Little Maid of Bunker Hill Alice T. Curtis 

Grandpa's Little Girls Grown Up Alice T. Curtis 

Katrina Ellen Douglas Deland 



Kay Danforth's Camp 

The Gunner Aboard the Yankee 

Doodles 

Adventures in Beaver Stream Camp 

Blind Trails 

Our Town and Civic Duty 

Polly Page's Yacht Club 

Polly Page's Ranch Club 

Biography of a Prairie Girl 

Grimm's Fairy Tales 

The Wolf Hunters 

Rosemary Greenaway 

The Village Shield, story of Mexico 

Treasure Flower, a Child of Japan 

Helen and the Find-out Club 

A Son of the Desert 

The Young Marooners 



Marie Dix 

Russell Doubleday 

Emma C. Dowd 

Maj. Dugmore 

Clayton H. Ernst 

Jane E. Fryer 

Izola L. Forrester 

Izola L. Forrester 

Eleanor Gates 

George Bird Grinnell 

Joslyn Gray 

Ruth Gaines 

Ruth Gaines 

Beth B. Gilchrist 

Bradley Gilman 

F. R. Goulding 

Rupert S. Holland 



Blackbeard's Island 

King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table 

Rupert S. Holland 



Joan of Juniper Inn 

Joan's Jolly Vacation 

Blue Bonnet's Ranch Party 

Smuggler's Island 

A Mayflower Maid 

The Garden Book 

Marjorie's Quest 

Martin Hyde, the Duke's Messenger 



Caroline E. Jacobs 

Caroline E. Jacobs 

Caroline E. Jacobs 

Clarissa A. Kneeland 

E. B. and A. A. Knipe 

Alice Lounsberry 

Jeanie Gould Lincoln 

John Masefield 



48 



Life of a Bee 

Tom Strong, Lincoln's Scout 

The Cart of Many Colors 

The Pool of Stars 

Master Simon's Garden 

Further Chronicles of Avonleae 

The Steam Shovel Man 

The Young Ice Whalers 

The Voyage of the Hoppergrass 

King Tom and the Runaways 

The Hilltop Troop 

Sylvia of the Hilltop 

Sylvia Arden Decides 

Pollyanna 

Watty and Co. 

Blue Bonnet, Debutante 

Blue Bonnet of the Seven Stars 

The Boy with the U. S. Explorers 

Opening the Iron Trail 

Boy Scouts in the Wilderness 

Rising Wolf 

The Slipper-point Mystery 

When Sarah Saved the Day 



Maurice Maeterlinck 

Alfred B. Mason 

Nannine LaV. Meiklejohn 

Cornelia Meigs 

Cornelia Meigs 

L. M. Montgomery 

Ralph D. Paine 

Winthrop Packard 

Edmund L. Pearson 

Louis Pendleton 

Arthur Stanwood Pier 

Margaret R. Piper 

Margaret R. Piper 

Eleanor H. Porter 

Edward H. Putnam 

Lela H. Richards 

Lela H. Richards 

Rolt-Wheeler 

Edwin L. Sabin 

Samuel Scoville 

James Willard Schultz 

Augusta H. Seaman 

Elsie Singmaster 

Elsie Singmaster 



When Sarah Went to School 

Young and Old Puritans of Hatfield Mary P. Wells Smith 

Young Puritans in King Philip's War Mary P. Wells Smith 

Boy Captive in Canada Mary P. Wells Smith 

Boys of the Border Mary P. Wells Smith 

Jolly Good Times Mary P. Wells Smith 

Jolly Good Times at Hackmatack Mary P. Wells Smith 

Captain Chap 

Treasure Island 

Kidnapped 

A Pilgrim Maid 

The Little Gray House 



Frank R. Stockton 
Rob't Louis Stevenson 
Rob't Louis Stevenson 
Marion Ames Taggart 
Marion Ames Taggart 



Bob Cook and the German Air Fleet 



P. G, Tomlinson 



49 



Chained Lightning Ralph Graham Taylor 

Morgan's Men John Preston True 

My Country, Civics and Patriotism G. A. Tarkington 



Scouting for Washington 
Peggy of Roundabout Lane 
Ranch Girls at Rainbow Lodge 
The Magic Forest 
The Ragged Inlet Guards 



John Preston True 

Edna Turpin 

Margaret Vandercook 

Stewart Edward White 

Dillon Wallace 



Our Little Czecho-Slovak Cousin Clara Vostrovsky Winlow 



Rebecca of Sunny Brook Farm 

New Chronicles of Rebecca 

Magic Casements 

Tales of Wonder 

Tales of Laughter 

Winona's Way 

Just Patty 

Redney McGaw 

Fairy Stories 

Tale of Timothy Turtle 

Tale of Major Monkey 

Once Upon a Time Stories 

Hero Stories 

Cherry Tree Children 

Polly and Dolly 

Pretty Polly Flinders 

Twilight Town 

Browne Readers Books I, II, III 

The Wonderful Chair 

Adventures of Sammy Jay 

Adventures of Grandfather Frog 

Adventures of Buster Bear 

Adventures of Reddy Fox 

Adventures of Peter Cottontail 

Adventures of Prickley Porky 

Old Mother West Wind 



Kate Douglas Wiggin 
Kate Douglas Wiggin 
Kate Douglas Wiggin 
Kate Douglas Wiggin 
Kate Douglas Wiggin 
Margaret Widdemer 
Jean Webster 

Hans Christian Anderson 

Arthur S. Bailey 

Arthur S. Bailey 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Mary Frances Blaisdell 

Mary Frances Blaisdell 

Mary Frances Blaisdell 

Mary Frances Blaisdell 

Frances Browne 
Thornton W. Burgess 
Thornton W. Burgess 
Thornton W. Burgess 
Thornton W. Burgess 
Thornton W. Burgess 
Thornton W. Burgess 
Thornton W. Burgess 



50 



Stories of Brave Dogs 

Cat Stones 

Brownie Primer 

So-fat and Mew-Mew 

The Monkey that Would not Kill 

Fox Third Reader 

Kittens and Cats 

The Overall Boys in Switzerland 

Folk Lore Readers I, II, III 

Bobbsey Twins in Washington 

Bobbsey Twins in the Great West 

Bunny Brown Giving a Show 

Bunny Brown at Christmas Cove 

Bunny Brown at Aunt Lu's 

Kindergarten Story Book 

About Harriet 

Cinderella 

Dick Whittington 

The Sleeping Beauty 

Green Fairy Book 

Rhymes and Stories 

Fairy Tales Books I, II and III 

Marjorie's Quest 

Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know 

Magee Readers I, II and III 

Mother Goose Rhymes 

The Dutch Twins Primer 

The Scotch Twins 

Three Little Millers 

The Millers at Pencroft 

Elizabeth Bess 

Nursery Tales from Many Lands 

Heidi " 

Little Curly Head 

Wade and Sylvester Primer 



M. C. Carter 

M. C. Carter 

Palmer Cox 

Georgina M. Crack 

Henry Drummond 

Eulalie Osgood Grover 

Eulalie Osgood Grover 

Eulalie Osgood Grover 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Laura Lee Hope 

Jane L. Hoxie 

Clara W. Hunt 

Andrew Lang 

Andrew Lang 

Andrew Lang 

Andrew Lang 

Marion F. Lansing 

Marion F. Lansing 

Jeanie Gould Lincoln 

H. W. Mabie 



Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Clara D. Pierson 

Clara D. Pierson 

E. C Scott 

E. L. and A. M. Skinner 

Johanna Spyri 

Johanna Spyri 



51 

Wade and Sylvester First and Second Readers 
Adventures of Molly, Waddy and Tony Paul Waitt 

Marjorie's Busy Days Carolyn Wells 

Story of a Donkey, adapted by Charles Welsh 

Sled, the Indian Clara Andrews Williams 

MAGAZINES AND PERIODICALS 

Harper's Magazine 
American Magazine 
Everybody's Magazine 
Good Housekeeping 
National Geographic 
Popular Mechanics 
World's Work 
Review of Reviews 
Saint Nicholas 
Boys' Life 
The American Boy 
John Martin's 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the Twenty- 
fifth Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows : 

Balance on deposit from last year's acct $1,219.19 

Certificate of Deposit 1,800.00 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

One Victory Bond 1,000.00 

Cash from Collection of Water Rates 5,306.88 

Sale of Lumber 100.00 

Interest on Certificate 63.00 

$10,489.07 

We have paid the past year as follows : 

Town of Hatfield, . . $2,900.00 

Salaries of Water Commissioners 125.00 

L. W. Kingsley, labor and supplies 68.15 

W. H. Riley & Co., supplies 86.51 

Norwood Engineering Co., supplies 62.25 

W. Heath, welding 18.00 

E. W. Strong, Coll. water rates, labor and 

cash paid out 481.47 

$3,741.38 



53 

Balance in Treasury : 

Cash on deposit $2,947.69 

Certificate of Deposit 1,800.00 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

One Victory Bond 1,000.00 



$10,489.07 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. KILEY, 
ROSWELL G. BILLINGS, 
L. A. DEINLEIN. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the town of Hat- 
field and find them correct with vouchers on file for all pay- 
ments made, and a balance in the Treasury of $6,747.69. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

January 17, 1921. Auditor. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THK 



School Committee 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1920 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Oscar E. Belden, Term expires 1921 

Adam J. Smith, Term expires 1922 

Thomas B. Cunningham, Term expires 1923 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Norman J. Bond, Northampton, Mass. 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1921 
Term opens January 3, 1921, closes February 25, 1921. 
Term opens March 7, 1921, closes April 29, 1921. 
Term opens May 9, 1921, closes June 22, 1921. 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield schools) 

C. A. Byrne, M. D., Hill, Bradstreet and West Hatfield 
schools). 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Henry L. Pelham. 



Report of School Committee 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

Our schools have maintained their high standard of ef- 
ficiency during the past year. Mr. T. W. King, superintend- 
ent, resigned Feb. 1, 1920, his successor being Mr. Norman 
J. Bond. After some months of service Mr. Bond resigned 
Jan. 1, 1921 ; continuing, however, to give a portion of his 
time to the schools until his successor shall take control. In 
December last Mr. Clinton J. Richards was elected super- 
intendent to assume office July 1, 1921. For many years 
Mr. Richards had charge of our schools and we are fortu- 
nate in again having his services. 

The salaries of teachers have increased during the 
year. Comparing Hatfield with neighboring towns of equal 
and greater population, of equal and greater valuation, we 
find that our teachers' salaries are higher than theirs. 

For the year 1919-1920 Hatfield had a school tax of 
$6.05 per $1000 valuation and expended for teachers' sal- 
aries $5.08 per $1000 valuation. 

In 1916 the average salary was $449. Jan. 1, 1920, the 
average salary was $826. Dec. 31, 1920, that had increased 
to nearly $1000, an increase in four years of nearly 125 per 
cent. 

The school buildings are in good condition except the 
one in West Hatfield. Minor repairs were made during the 
past summer. At the Hill school the heating apparatus broke 
down during the past month. If the repairs made are not 
adequate, a new heating plant should be installed. 



59 

The special committee appointed by the last town 
meeting to bring in plans and specifications for a new school 
building at West Hatfield have held several meetings and 
will present plans prepared by Mr. Putnam of SNorthamp- 
ton. The need of a new building is immediate. State au- 
thorities say of the present building "the absenec of modern 
sanitary conditions, adequate lighting, proper ventilation 
and general interior and exterior attractiveness, are such as 
to make the abandonment of this building almost impera- 
tive." 

THOS. B. CUNNINGHAM, 
ADAM J. SMITH, 
OSCAR E. BELDEN. 



Financial Statement 



For Fiscal Year Ending Dec. 31, 1920 

RESOURCES 

From State : 

Superintendent of Schools $525.78 

Income Tax 2,800.00 

General School Fund 1,310.52 

Tuition : 

Whately tuition $253.00 

Town appropriation 18,000.00 

Tickets 298.27 

Dog fund 59.62 



EXPENDITURES 

Salaries : 

Teachers $14,855.78 

Janitors 2,323.28 

Supervisors 300.00 

Superintendent of Schools 1,040.00 

Books and supplies $2,553.52 

Fuel 2,677.11 

Repairs 310.24 

Transportation 180.00 

Miscellaneous 1,331.87 



$23,247.19 



Total expenditures $25,571.80 



Report of the 

Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee of the Town of Hatfield : 
Gentlemen : 

It is a pleasure to present to you and to the people of 
Hatfield a short report of certain conditions of the public 
schools. 

HOUSING 

With the exception of the West Hatfield school house 
the material conditions of the school houses of the town is 
rather above the average. Of course the Center building is 
excellent. As a special committee is considering plans for a 
new building in West Hatfield little need be stated here in 
regard to the present building which was strongly objected 
to by an agent of the state department of education. The 
contemplated building will provide for the children an at- 
tractive school house adapted to their educational needs and 
will moreover meet the requirements of safety and health. 
The school houses not mentioned above meet nearly all the 
minimum requirements of modern school buildings in re- 
spect to educational needs, hygiene and health. These 
buildings do not require immediate attention except minor 
repairs which can be made with little cost. 

SPECIAL CLASSES 

Last April in compliance with the law pupils were ex- 
amined with reference to their mental ability. The law 
requires special classes for pupils retarded three years or 
more in mental development. These cases have been deter- 



62 

mined according to regulations prescribed by the state de- 
partment of education. In addition to the few pupils three 
years or more retarded there are a considerable number of 
pupils who are unable to do the regular work of their 
grades. There has been no place for these backward children 
and there is not yet any ungraded class which 1 could accom- 
modate these pupils. Pupils assigned to the proposed un- 
graded classes are not subject to promotion until they give 
evidence of being able to do the work of the regular grade. 
The ungraded pupils may be transferred at any time to the 
regular grades when they show that they can do the work. 
In this connection it may be stated that the standard of the 
grades cannot be lowered to meet the abilities of the lag- 
gards for the work of the grades is based on a' course of 
study that meets only the minimum educational require- 
ments of organized society. The benefits to be derived from 
the operation of ungraded classes are very great indeed, not 
only for the laggards but also for the pupils of usual and of 
exceptional abilities. Much of the criticism about the inabil- 
ity of the public school pupils to do simple reasoning prob- 
lems is no doubt due to the fact that the pupils have not 
been carefully graded and that the teachers have not been 
required to meet standards of accomplishment. Ungraded 
classes should be formed immediately quite independently 
of the law for classes for pupils retarded three years or 
more in mental development. If it is just for the pupils of 
usual abilities to be segregated from the slow ones then it 
follows that pupils of exceptional abilities should be segre- 
gated in an ideal school system in order to permit them to 
advance more rapidly than the other boys and girls. The 
number of such pupils is small compared with the number 
of backward children and therefore their consideration is 
not quite so important. However no modern school system 
is right that tends to retard even a small part of the school 
population. 



63 



The table below shows all the pupils distributed by age 
and grade. The table was prepared in April, 1920, soon after 
the change of superintendents. The diagonal represents the 
pupils of usual abilities. That is ,if a child enters the school 
system at six years of age and makes the usual progression 
he will finish the eighth grade when he is thirteen years of 
age. The pupils represented by numbers above the diagonal 
are accelerated and those represented by numbers below the 
diagonal are retarded and the degree of acceleration and re- 
tardation is indicated by the ages on the right and left sides 
of the table. 



Hatfield -all schools combined 



Grades 1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




5 


2 
















5 






6 


^8^ 


7 














6 






7 


35 


^ 


1 












7 






8 


8 


18 


S ^*s 


4 










8 






9 


3 


17 


17 


^ 


1 








9 




tf) 


10 




4 


19 


21 


^ 


6 






10 


> 


U 

o 

< 


11 




1 


11 


10 


17 


s* 


5 


1 


11 


O 
m 


12 






4 


7 


8 


10 


^K 


6 


12 


(A 




13 






1 


2 


10 


7 


9 


h ^K 


13 






14 












2 


5 


4 


14 






15 










1 




1 


2 


15 






16 


















16 






17 


















17 






18 


















18 




Totals 104 


90 


60 


62 


48 


40 


41 


28 




Grand Total 


473 



Showing the distribution of all the pupils by age and grade 
(Table prepared in April, 1920) 



64 

SCHOOL NURSE 

A competent school nurse would be of great assistance 
to the school system. The town as well as parents individ- 
ually is vitally interested in the health of the children. The 
number of children in the schools at present and the num- 
ber of little boys and girls who will soon be in the school 
system justify the expenditure of a sufficient amount of 
money to cover the salary and expense of a nurse. A sched- 
ule of inspection, nursing at the homes, and instruction of 
the teachers and pupils, could easily be made. I am confi- 
dent that a good nurse would more than pay the town for 
her salary. It is urgently recommended that the town au- 
thorize a competent nurse to look after the health of the 
school children. 

NEW COURSE OF STUDY BASED ON PSYCHOLOGY 

As a rule teachers do not agree as to the purpose of 
public schooling. There are almost as many different ideas 
in regard to this as there are teachers. This diversity ac- 
counts in some measure for the great waste of time and the 
great reduplication of the same mental activities. For these 
reasons the product of the elementary schools is mediocre 
compared with what it should be. Too often teachers regard 
education in terms of books covered or courses of study 
completed or in terms of the requirements of some higher 
educational institution. The new course of study which is 
only partly adopted is designed to challenge the best there 
is in our teeachers, and to put education on a scientific ba- 
sis. While it is true that the demands of society require cer- 
tain subjects from generation to generation it is also true 
that science has discovered when and how it is best to begin 
and to continue different studies and activities of the grow- 
ing children. It is urgently recommended that the new pro- 
gram of studies be more fully adopted not only in the ele- 
mentary schools but also in the Academy if the Academy 



65 

should become a part of the public school system of the 
town. The new program with the grading and health 
changes recommended will do much to improve educational 
conditions in Hatfield. The emphasis will be placed in all 
of these changes on how to secure the best development of 
all the powers of the school children. To try to develop the 
mental and physical abilities of the boys and girls is a far 
better aim that to try to cover a certain number of books 
and pages. 

"THE SEVEN OBJECTIVES OF EDUCATION" 

Mr. Clarence D. Kingsley of the State Department of 
Education has enunciated the following as the main objec- 
tives of education : 

1. Health 

2. Command of fundamental processes 

3. Worthy home membership 

4. Vocation 

5. Civic education 

6. Worthy use of leisure 

7. Ethical character 

The above list of objectives can probably be realized 
after completion from the high school, but it seems to me 
that they are rather unattainable for the elementary school, 
and for this reason I suggest the following for the ele- 
mentary schools : 

1. The elementary schools should provide for the in- 
dividual child : instruction in the common media of com- 
munication between his fellow beings. These are funda- 
mental subjects and are commonly known as the three R's. 
They are more, however, than reading, writing and arith- 
metic, for they should include literature, English composi- 



tion and concrete mathematics. Under concrete mathematics 
are elementary algebra and geometry of measurement and 
construction. 

2. Instruction concerning his own body, the functions 
of, and the care of the same. Under this heading should be 
included physiology, hygienne and sanitation. 

3. Instruction concerning the great past of his coun- 
try. History is included under this heading. Civics and cit- 
izenship are allied subjects and should be included here for 
the purpose of inculcating ideals of patriotism and good 
citizenship. 

4. Instruction concerning the elementary phenomena 
of nature. This includes an elementary explanation of the 
facts, laws and processes of the physical world about him. 
The studies which exemplify these are science and nature 
study. 

5. Instruction concerning the location and comparison 
of places both useful and interesting to man. Geography is 
the subject represented here. 

6. Instruction concerning his relationships to other 
people. The functions of and respect for public officials 
should be dwelt upon by the teachers. 

7. Instruction in an important modern language. At 
the present time French is a very popular modern language 
and also a very useful one. Furthermore, elementary 
schools should provide for the individual child. 

8. Means for discovering such special aptitudes as may 
exist in him and foster the formation of new ones in har- 
mony with them. Vocational guidance is indicated here. 

9. Activities and an environment suitable to his nor- 
mal, physical and mental development. 



67 

10. An environment which habituates him to right ac- 
tion. That the child may act automatically in the right way 
in response to the same stimulus under all conditions is the 
purpose of moral education. 

11. Lastly, the elementary school should develop with- 
in its own sphere an appreciation of the beautiful in com- 
mon things. Art, drawing and music are here to be consid- 
ered. 

It may be noted that the functions of the public school 
which I have just stated above make no mention of the re- 
ligious interests of the children. Of course, it is admitted 
that any child should be instructed in religion and the 
church exists for this purpose and the church should assume 
its responsibility, but much can be done toward establishing 
certain ideals which are neither contrary to the purpose of 
the school or of the church nor impossible of realization. 

By forming parent-teachers' associations and by visita- 
tion at the schools much can be done. 

THE PILGRIM TERCENTENNIAL 

During the year a considerable amount of time has 
been devoted to the study of the Pilgrims. A comprehensive 
course of study prepared by the State Department of Edu- 
cation has been placed in the hands of each teacher. It is 
hoped that parents will co-operate with the teachers in em- 
phasizing the importance of the celebration of the landing 
of the Pilgrims in order to emphasize the great ideals for 
which the Pilgrims stand. 

TEACHERS 

As in any other profession mediocrity prevails among 
the teachers. Teachers may for convenience be classified in 
the following divisions : Superior teachers, excellent teach- 



68 

ers, good teachers and tolerable teachers. Hatfield has a fair 
proportion of good and excellent teachers as compared with 
other towns under the present shortage of thoroughly ex- 
perienced teachers. 

ATTENDANCE 

With the exception of a week or so at the beginning of 
the school year the attendance at school has been good. It is 
urged that the parents co-operate with the teachers and at- 
tendance officers in maintaining regular and prompt attend- 
ance of all children attending school. There is a direct re- 
lation between failure in school work and habitual absence 
and tardiness. What is needed, however, is an aggressive 
truant officer to enforce the attendance of a few pupils who 
attempt to evade the attendance law T s. In many cases when 
children stay out of school because of alleged sickness the 
services of a school nurse would be very valuable indeed. If 
the sickness were trivial and of such a nature as not to be 
harmful to the other children the nurse could notify the at- 
tendance officer and the child could be brought into school. 
There is a constant and persistent effort on the part of cer- 
tain parents and others to minimize the importance of reg- 
ular and punctual attendance at school. The co-operation of 
the public with the school officials in the enforcement of the 
law is greatly needed to secure the best results. 

CONCLUSION 

Space does not permit of a detailed discussion of many 
other conditions and problems of the public schools. The 
schools are far from a failure and they are also far from 
that very high degree of success which a more efficient 
organization and a greater knowledge of education will 
eventually produce. It is certain that the progressive school 
system of the future will consider more and more the indi- 
vidual capacities and abilities of the children and will differ- 



69 

entiate far more than ever before. Undoubtedly we are en- 
tering a period of educational reform, and it has been a 
source of gratification to the superintendent to have had 
something to do with the beginning of this reform in the 
Hatfield public schools. 

Finally, the superintendent wishes to express his appre- 
ciation of the co-operation which he has had on all sides in 
the administration of the public schools, since April last. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NORMAN J. BOND. 
Hatfield, Mass., Jan. 10, 1921. 



Report of 

Supervisor of Music 



What place has music in the life of our nation ? Do we 
realize the multitude of purposes music serves in our home, 
church and social life, and what its place was in our recent 
world war? Consider these things and we will realize the 
value of a course in music in the public school life of our 
children. 

No subject in the entire school curriculum has as broad 
an educational value as music. It includes English in its 
word singing and written work, arithmetic in its time prob- 
lems, and physical culture in its breathing exercises and tone 
placing. It can be correlated with history, art, geography 
and literature. It requires concentration and develops 
confidence and self-expression. 

Music is not for a few but for all, therefore our aim is to 
give each child a technical training to enable him to inter- 
pret good music intelligently, and that those who wish to 
study further will have a good foundation to work upon. 

The technical training includes a knowledge of the bass 
and treble clefs, the major and minor scales and their key 
signatures, chromatic tones, their representations with note 
values and rests, common and compound time, different 
rhythms, terms of tempo and expression, syllable and word 
readings. The child in the primary grades acquires a tonal 
vocabulary, develops good tone quality, rythm and oral ex- 
pression thro their repertoire of rote songs pleasing to child 
nature. 



71 

The duty of the supervisor of music is to visit each of 
the sixteen rooms weekly. It is a source of pleasure and in- 
spiration in my visits to each grade to meet the hearty co- 
operation of the teachers and I wish to take this opportunity 
to thank them for their sincere efforts in the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



72 






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Mrs. David Mullaney 
Sarah V. Kiely 
Mrs. James Bardwell 
Dorothy Woods 
Mrs. Mary B. Powers 
Lena H. Proulx 
Margaret H. Lovett 
M. Elizabeth Boyle 
Anna C. Murphy 
Cecile K. LaFleur 
Rhena M. Horton 
Grace H. O'Brien 
Helen K. Breor 
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ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR TJHI-: 



Year Ending December 31, 1921 



The Metcalf Printing Co. 

northampton", mass. 
1922 



Finance Committee 



Your Finance Committee recommend the following 
Appropriations : — 

Ninth payment and interest Center Schoolhouse 

loan $ 3,035 

West Hatfield Schoolhouse loan 5,000 

Article 5 — Highways : 

Ordinary repairs highways and bridges, and 

patching, oiling and repairs Stone roads, 7,000 
Article 6 — Necessary town expenses : 

Bonds — Town officers 100 

Memorial Hall — care of 150 

Tree Warden . .<. 200 

Inspection of Animals 200 

Fire Department 800 

Insurance 300 

Contingencies v 1,500 

Poor — care of 1,500 

Interest 2,000 

Salaries — Town officers 2,200 

Schools — Maintenance of 30,000 

Article 7 — Memorial Day 120 

Article 10 — Care of Cemeteries 100 

Article 11 — Public Library 750 

Article 13 — School Physicians 100 

Article 14 — Hampshire Trustees for County Aid. 150 

Article 15 — Smith Industrial School 200 

Article 18— Street Lights 4,300 

$ 59,705 



4 

The f6llowing appropriations for stone roads and side- 
walk construction are not recommended by your Finance 
Committee, who believe in "Economy" as our slogan in 1922. 

However, these projects have been suggested to us and. 
recognizing the benefits of good roads, these articles have 
our approval. 

The voters must decide how far they will go in the direc- 
tion of these permanent. improvements. 
Article 22 — Stone, road for underpasses — West 

Hatfield $ 2,500 

Article 23 — Extending Stone road in Bradstreet 5,000 

Article 24— Stone road, North Street 5,000 

Article 25— Cement Walk, Main Street 1,000 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
Wm. L. BELDEN, 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Warrant 

For Town Meeting, February 6, 1922 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Hampshire, ss. 

To L. H. Kingsley, one of the Constables of the town of 
Hatfield, in said County, Greeting : — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
town of Hatfield, qualified to vote in elections and town 
affairs, to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, 
the 6th day of February, next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 
then and there to act on the following named articles, to wit :■ — 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2 To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; one Assessor 
for three years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee for 
three years; one Water Commissioner for three years; one 
Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years; one Trustee 
Public Library for three years; Auditor; Tree Warden; 
Elector, — under the Will, of Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; 
Director of Hampshire Trustees for County Aid to Agricul- 
ture; six Constables; and to vote on the question — "Yes" or 
" No ' ' — Shall License be granted for the sale of Certain Non- 
Intoxicating Beverages in this Town ? 
All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 
and be kept open at least four hours, and for such longer time 



as the majority of the voters present shall direct, but in no 
case shall they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock 
in the evening. 

Article 3. To hear the reports of the various town 
officers and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5. To take action in relation to maintenance 
and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year, and 
raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6 To take action in relation to raising money 
and appropriating same to defray the necessary expenses of 
the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7. To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8. To take action in relation to support of the 
poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appropriate money 
for the same. 

Article 9. To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 

Article 10. To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money in anticipation of revenue of the current financial year. 

Article .13. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the employment of one or more School 
Physicians, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 502, 
Acts of 1906. 



Article 14. To see if the town will appropriate $150 
for the support of the Hampshire Trustees for County Aid to 
Agriculture ,and elect a director of that organization who will 
be the official town representative for said Trustees as per 
Chap. 273 of the Acts of 1918. 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children 
attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for supplies and maintenance of the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for Tree Warden and Gypsy and Brown Tail 
Moth Work. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of Money for Street Lights, and authorize 
the Selectmen to make a one-year contract with the Amherst 
Cias Company. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to accept Sec- 
tion 25A, of Chapter 41, of the General Laws, "An Act to 
authorize assessors in towns to appoint assistant assessors." 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote authorizing 
John Borowski to fill up, grade, and improve the town land 
front of his residence at Riverside. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
relocation and establishing of the boundaries of the road from 
residence of E. N. Dickinson, Westerly to bars of George B. 
McClennan's pasture at Chestnut Mt. Also, road in Indian 
Field. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,500 for constructing and draining a 
stone road under and between the two Railroad underpasses at 
West Hatfield, or act anything thereon. 



Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 — together with a like amount 
received from the State — to be expended in extending the 
stone road in Bradstreet — North or South, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 in building a stone road on 
North Street, or act anything thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to extend the 
cement walk near residence of David Billings Southerly, and 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000 for same, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for police protection for the ensu- 
ing year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 27. To see if the town will authorize the Select- 
men to add to its present By-Laws by establishing certain by- 
laws for regulating the construction and situation of build- 
ings erected in the future, according to the provisions of 
Section 25, Chap. 40 General Laws. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote giving the 
Water Commissioners authority to purchase two tracts of land 
owned by Joseph Sadoski and Charles Keszontsk, so as to pre- 
vent all further danger of contamination of Hatfield's Water 
supply. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : — 

In accordance with the requirements of the Statutes of 

Massachusetts, the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1921, is respectfully submitted. 

STATE AID 

State Aid paid to one person $ 48.00 

POOR EXPENDITURES 

City of Northampton $ 864.00 

Fan-en Memorial Hospital 307.72 

Dickinson Hospital 37.00 

Eye & Ear Infirmary 212.30 

Beaven-Kelley Home 54.67 

Providence Hospital 31.25 

Dr. Chas. A. Byrne, medical attendance 9.00 

Dr. Geo. A. Cook, medical attendance 36.00 

Dr. P. E. Dow, medical attendance 6.00 

Dr. A. G. MinshalL medical attendance 3.00 

Mrs. "W. H. Dickinson, medical attendance 21.42 

M. J. Ryan, sup 57.66 

A. W. Stone, tickets to Poland 144.50 

Scott Harris, trans 10.00 

Carrie A. Gauthier, trans 4.45 

J. S. Bardwell, digging grave 5.00 



$ 1,803.97 



Hampshire County Sanatorium $ 94.50 



10 
OLD BILLS 

Smith Academy $ 1,000.00 

0. E. Belden, salary, 1920 50.00 

Thos. B. Cunningham, salary, 1920 75.00 

Adam J. Smith, salary, 1920 * 60.00 

H. W. Wolfram, labor, orcl 15.00 

S. W. Kingsley, labor ord 26.00 

J. T. Powers, labor, ord 8.00 

H. L. Stoddard, labor, ord 21.00 

W. C. Tannart, bal. cement walk . 400.00 

L. H. Kingsley, recording births, marriages and 

deaths 134.50 

Leon Zaskey, labor, ord. . 12.00 

Andrew Klekut, sand 7.50 

George Fusek, sand 3.00 

M. J. Walsh, cement . , 7.50 

F. L. Betsold, labor, ord 31.55 

M. J. Ryan, sup. ord 40.34 



$ 1,891.39 

TOWN OFFICERS 

Chas. E. Warner, auditor, 1920 $ 10.00 

S. W. Kingsley, police 16.00 

Marian C. Billings, ballot clerk 5.00 

Chas. J. Stowell, ballot clerk 5.00 

Dennis E. Holley, ballot clerk • 5.00 

Joseph E. Godin, ballot clerk 5.00 

Robert J. McGrath, ballot clerk 5.00 

Mary R. McGlynn, ballot clerk 5.00 

John R. McGrath, assessor 253.75 

L. H. Kingsley, assessor 283.50 

Wm. H. Dickinson, selectman 150.00 

Edw. A. Breor, selectman 75.00 

Scott Harris, selectman 75.00 

A. R. Breor, police duty. 122.00 



11 

Peter L. Baline, sealer's salary 150.00 

S. M. Boundon, police duty 5.00 

Joseph Godouski, police duty 21.00 

George Eberlein, police duty 1.00 

L. H .Kingsley, Town Clerk and clerk of Board of 

Selectmen 500.00 

L. H. Kingsley, treasurer and registrar of voters. 310.00 

Thos. W. Ryan, registrar of voters 10.00 

L. A. Billings, registrar of voters 10.00 

R, W. Weber, registrar of voters 10.00 



$ 2,032.25 

VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY 

F. H. Bardwell, treasurer $ 100.00 

TREE WARDEN 

Amherst Gas Co., labor $ 22.98 

Geo. Eberlein, labor 3.25 

J. S. Bardwell, labor 81.50 

J. S. Butler, labor 16.00 

W. Birmingham, labor 7.50 

Chester Simkofski, labor 22.50 

John J. Breor, labor 2.80 

Foster-Farrar Co., supplies 19.83 

F. J. Saffer, filing saws 3.00 



$ 179.36 

CONTINGENCIES 

Chas. A. Byrne, return of births $ 1.50 

Amherst Gas Co., town hall 35.24 

John J. Small, care town hall 20.00 

Herald Job Print, town reports and ballots 440.00 

H. D. Smith, coal 103.15 

M. C. Bailey, shingles 18.00 



12 



W. L. Graves, plumbing 

Est. A. L. Strong, wood 

P. R. Mullany, envelopes, stamps, etc 

P. B. Murphy, posters 

John J. Bestold, wood 

A. E. Breor, police dut y 

F. G. Vollinger, transportation 

C. H. Chase, transfers 

Foster-Farrar Co., supplies 

Cook & Hickey, law 

Hammond & Hammond, law 

J. E. Hickey, agency 

Library Bureau, filing cabinet 

P. S. O'DonnelL police 

H. L. Pellam. clock, janitor work 

W. L. Chilson, sealer's supplies 

Johnson's Bookstore, tax book 

E. M. McGrath. rep. slate 

C. J. Stowell, Wilkie plot 

E. E. Davis, surveying 

C. T. Bagnall, printing 

P. H. Chew, binding 

Overland Garage, ambulance 

Geo. H. Newman, police 

H. S. Gere & Sons, advertising 

Wm. P. Boyle, glass and putty, town hall 

J. J. Moriarty, chairs, town hall 

L. H. Kingsley. serving warrants, ex. and sup.. 

Ohas. Eberlein, rep. water tanks 

August Chandler, forest fire * 

M. H. Dwigrht. forest fire 



91.21 


10.00 


15.23 


1.25 


61.00 


15 00 


6.00 


10.20 


42.45 


15.00 


5.00 


83.16 


110.22 


5.00 


103.75 


6.00 


2.25 


11.50 




94.75 


11.66 


1.50 


10.00 


9.00 


12.65 


9.75 


7.00 


13.16 


10.00 


3.00 


3.00 


$ 1.465.18 



13 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 

Norman J. Bond, as superintendent $ 335.59 

Constance C. Mullany, as teacher 5.00 

Grace H. O'Brien, as teacher 541.50 

Catharine B. Brace, as teacher 963.00 

Nellie E. Salvas, as teacher 950.00 

Rhena M. Horton, as teacher.' 950.00 

Helen K. Breor, as teacher 570.50 

Cecile E. LaFleur, as teacher 761.44 

M. Elizabeth Boyle, as teacher 921.50 

Anna C. Murphy, as teacher 570.00 

Dorothy Woods, as teacher 541.50 

Margaret A. Ryan, as teacher 1,000.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, as teacher 975.00 

Clinton J. Richards, as superintendent 1,206.95 

Mary B. Powers, as teacher 1,100.00 

Grace W. Bardwell, as teacher 963.96 

Margaret P. Ryan, as teacher 89.00 

Cecilia Ryan, as teacher. . . .* 12.50 

Lena H. Proulx, as teacher 990.00 

Margaret Mullany, as teacher 1,000.00 

Maude E. Boyle, music 667.00 

Margaret H. Lovett, as teacher 391.88 

Marian C. Billings, as teacher 132.50 

Marion Brennan, as teacher 172.50 

Mary D. Donelson, as teacher. 90.00 

Lina K. Belden, as teacher 15.00 

Joseph T. Ryan, as teacher 5.00 

Harold C. Wilcox, as principal 1,027.19 

Hannah G. Wilcox, as teacher 268.00 

H. E. Gaskill, as teacher 507.00 

Elsie V. Duberg, as teacher 418.00 

Mary E. Ryan, as teacher 475.00 

Cora King Graves, as teacher 475.00 

D. Webster Belcher, as teacher 247.50 

Richard B. Barlow, as teacher 171.00 

L. H. Bailey, as teacher 322.50 



14 

Alexandra J. Smith, as teacher 361.00 

Elizabeth P. Wickles, as teacher 361.00 

Rachel J. Palmer, as teacher 361.00 

Frances M. Wood, as teacher 361.00 

Mabel G. Chittim, as teacher 361.00 

Elizabeth Halloran, as teacher 16.86 

Mrs. Geo. A. Deinlein, as teacher 17.50 

Teachers' Retirement Board. . ; 753.93 

Frank Brehm, janitor 1,191.52 

Geo. D. Kingsley, janitor 364.20 

John Salvas, janitor 255.20 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor 197.05 

John T. Slattery, janitor 172.63 

Mrs. John K. Holt, janitor 129.35 

Alice Holt, janitor ' 7.75 

H. L. Pellam, janitor and truants 112.50 

H. D. Smith, coal 2,293.52 

H. W. Wolfram, coal 652.13 

John J. Bestold, wood ) 110.00 

Amherst Gas Co., light ' . . 38.77 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone. 48.47 

Chas. Eberlein, repairs 5.45 

W. H. Riley & Co., plumbing repairs . 513.74 

W. L. Graves, plumbing repairs 10.45 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting repairs 501.76 

Clarence Hawkes, books 26.25 

O. Belden & Sons, care lawn 30.00 

O. E. Belden, transportation tickets 7.50 

Iroquois Pub. Co., books 20.98 

Silver, Burdette & Co., books 16.79 

Wright & Potter ,supplies 5.04 

J. B. Lippincott Co., books 33.45 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies 295.60 

Northampton Commercial College, printing 88.26 

Milton Bradley Co., supplies 73.25 

Foster-Farrar Co., supplies 28.75 

H. K. White, music 1.85 



15 

LaFleur Bros., supplies 1.60 

American Book Co., books . 69.73 

J. W .Heffernan, books 311.71 

Consolidated Dry Goods Co., supplies 31.65 

The Macmillan Co., books. , 69.60 

McKinley Publishing Co., books .82 

Oliver Ditson Co., music 22.18 

F. M. Crittenden, printing 20.75 

A. F. Foote, boiler inspection 4.00 

Sinclair Refining Co., oil 35.63 

Ginn & Company, books 190.88 

Merrick Lumber Co 108.97 

Little Brown & Co., books 11.03 

Rand, McNally & Co., maps 8.42 

Allyn & Bacon, books 32.41 

Gazette Printing Co., printing 29.50 

Bernice Cutter, census 19.00 

A. H. Beers, survey 3.00 

Coburn & Graves, supplies 11.91 

World Book Co., books 17.75 

D. C. Heath & Co., books 81.81 

B. & M. Road, freight 28.04 

Kingsbury Box Co., printing 6.25 

C. N. Fitts, supplies 328.00 

C. B. Dolge Co., supplies 57.60 

A. N. Palmer Co., supplies 31.50 

E. J. Gare & Son, clocks. 9.00 

Webster Box Co., transportation 18.00 

E. E. Babb & Co., books 51.65 

Wm. Lesczczyeski, sewer 16.50 

John Selinski, sewer 16.50 

Chester Semkofski, sewer 12.00 

Jacob Geis, sewer 45.50 

J. S. Bardwell, sewer 76.50 

F. T. Bardwell, sewer 8.00 

John Koblinski, sewer 16.75 

John J. Breor, sewer , 22.75 



16 

Stanley Hader, sewer 17.75 

John L. Boyle, sewer 46.23 

John Zapka, sewer 5.75 

F. G. Howard, supplies 10.99 

P. L. Balise, wiring 111.53 

J. W. O'Connor, repairs 36.37 

F. J. Harris & Son, repairs 94.52 

L. E. Knott Ap. Co., books 88.81 

Orange Judd Pub. Co., magazines. . . . 22.34 

Newson & Co., books 202.98 

The Parker Co., books 12.75 

Doubleday, Page & Co., books 7.50 

John C. Winston & Co., books 40.46 

Modern Pub. Co., books .75 

Webb Publishing Co., books 5.25 

John Wiley & Sons, books 6.49 

Scott, Fosseman & Co., books 9.57 

Arthur P. Schmidt Co., books 8.36 

Russell & Erwin, key 1.64 

Chemical Rubber Co., supplies 2.86 

D. Appleton & Co., supplies 3.06 

David Shea, piano 7.00 

Smith Academy 2,722.28 

$ 34,960.14 
NEW SCHOOLHOUSE— WEST HATFIELD 

Karl S. Putnam, architect $ 775.00 

Edw. R. Connelly, Contractor . 10,632.61 

Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co 2,315.76 

Kenney Bros. & Walkins, furniture 867.30 

C. N. Fitts, supplies 62.60 

J. A. Sullivan, cement 38.70 

Michael Dulaski, walk 8.00 

A. B. Wolfram, painting and oiling 14.50 

Wm. B. Boyle, labor, painting 23.72 

Joseph Goller, sale of land 300.00 

$ 15,038.19 



17 



BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 



Boyle & McGlynn, for Treasurer $ 40.00 

Boyle & McGlynn, for water commissioner 12.00 

Boyle ■& McGlynn, for tax collector 50.00 



$ 102.00 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY FARM BUREAU 

Farm Bureau, treasurer $ 150.00 

ORDINARY REPAIRS— HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 

James S. Bardwell, as superintendent and team. .$ 483.50 

Thomas J. Ryan, labor, snow work 225.00 

Wm. P. Boyle, repairs 10.10 

B. & M. road, freight, snow plow 11.55 

New England Road Machine Co., snow plow. . . . 105.00 

N. Y. N. H. & H. Road, freight on stone 12.54 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 432.00 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 440.00 

Edw. A. Breor, truck and labor . 42.50 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team and labor. . 12.00 

James L. Boyle, team and labor 24.00 

C. H. Crafts, team -and labor 20.00 

Geo. Eberlein, repairs 9.65 

C. J. Eberlein, painting water cart 25.00 

Thos. M. Day, team and labor 14.00 

B. Fralick, team and labor 32.00 

F. G. Vollinger, team and labor 16.00 

James S. Butler, labor 30.00 

Frank Johnson, labor 30.00 

W. Birmingham, labor 48.00 

Mike Swistek, labor 9.00 

John J. Breor, labor 11.2.75 

Chester Semkofski, labor 88.50 

Ed. S. Dickinson, labor 12.75 

Stan Rogalewski, labor 42.00 



18 

Alex Rogalewski, labor 31.50 

Jacob Geir, labor 91 .50 

Barney Nyzio, labor 77.25 

Daniel Slmnce, labor 6.00 

Anthony Jandowsky, labor 15.00 

John Koblinski, labor , 25.50 

M. W. Boyle, care common 25.00 

C. J. Stowell, care common 50.00 

Mike Yarrows, labor 4.00 

E. W. Strong,' plank 629.87 

M. C. Bailey, 2x6 68.38 

P. F. O'Leary, signs 32.00 

F. G. Howard, supplies 14.03 

H. W. Wolfram, labor. .' 32.00 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co., culvert 28.50 

W. L. Graves, repairs, water tank 10.40 

C. A. Mavnard Co., shovels 17.00 



$ 3,445.77 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS— SLAUGHTERING 
Fred T. Bardwell $ 117.60 


E. Seward Warner 


302.00 


$ 

INSURANCE 
H. L. Howard $ 


419.60 

513.77 


Boyle & McGlynn 


134.00 



$ 647.77 

SMITH'S AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 
Tuition , $ 412.50 



19 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Sherwood Co., books $ 343.27 

Library Book House, books , 26.36 

Hampshire Bookshop, books 4.01 

Ginn & Co., books 24.95 

Gaylord Bros., books 19.35 

Amherst Gas Co., 15.85 

Carrie C. Cutter, magazines and labor 40.25 

Gazette Printing Co., cards 12.00 

Milton Bradley Co., supplies 6.76 

H. R. Huntting Co., books 9.25 

Hall & McCreary Co., books 5.13 

Ellen A. Waite, librarian 200.00 

Margaret P. Ryan, librarian's assistant 63.60 



$ 770.78 

MEMORIAL HALL 

Est. A. L. Strong, wood $ 20.00 

W. L. Graves, repairs, furnace 11.80 

H. D. Smith, coal 124.55 



$ 156.35 



SEWERS— NORTH STREET 

W. S. Simpson, tile $ 509.95 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile 315.59 

Howes Brick Co., brick 20.00 

H. D. Smith, cement 22.50 

Mike Swistek, labor "' 42.00 

Mike Dulaski, labor 23.25 

Stanley Rogalewski, labor 45.00 

Alex. Rogalewski, labor 48.00 

Jacob Geis, labor 15.00 

John Koblinski, labor 9.00 

J. S. Bardwell, labor 55.00 



20 

Stanley Garboski, labor 30.00 

Chester Semkofski, labor 10.50 

Joseph Zimbeski, labor 15.00 

Lawrence Waskiewicz, labor 6.00 

Roman Stryzko, labor .9.00 

Anthony Jandinski, labor 45.00 

$ 1,220.79 

Bills for tile and entrance paid and due 782.36 

STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Company $ 4,340.75 

VALLEY STREET STONE ROAD 

The Barrett Co., T. X. A. Tarvia $ 343.80 

John S. Lane & Son, stone 136.14 

Hebert Bros. Coal Co., coal 18.32 

N. Y. N. H. & H. Road, freight on stone 121.29 

Bissell, oil. 4.00 

Jacob Geis, labor. 33.00 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 40.00 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor 41.00 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 175.00 

E. A. Breor, truck and labor 60.00 

H. L. Stoddard, engineering 30.00 

$ 1.002.55 

REPAIRS, PATCHING AND OILING STONE ROADS 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor. $ 298.00 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 64.50 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 48.00 

James S. Butler, labor 7.50 

"W. Birmingham, labor 7.50 

Frank Johnson, labor 12.00 

John Koblinski, labor 76.50 



21 



E. A. Breor, labor 8.00 

Chester Senikofski, labor 70.50 

Stanley Rogalewski, labor 51.00 

John J. Breor, labor 132.00 

Barney Nazyio, labor 48.00 

Carlson & Barger, iron 7.40 

Arthur R. Breor, labor 12.00 

Michael Gogel, labor 7.50 

Paul Micka, labor 6.00 

¥m. Greenough, labor 1.50 

John Zapka, labor 7.50 

Thos. Karpenski, labor 6.00 

John Silenski, labor 6.00 

Jacob Geis, labor 63.00 

Anthony Giminski, labor 6.00 

Anthony W. Jandinsky, labor 87.00 

Daniel Shmutz, labor 24.00 

The Barrett Co., tarvia 3,177.32 

John S. Lane & Son, pea and dust 281.71 

B. & M. Road, freight on stone and tar 315.68 

N. Y. N. H. & H. Road, freight on tar 105.59 



MEMORIAL DAY 



C. K. Morton '. 

Webster Box Co., transportation 



$ 4,937.70 



124.90 
12.50 



$ 137.40 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

John F. O'Shea ,labor and cash $ 2.50 

John H. Marlow, fire chief, Northampton 25.00 

Wm. J. Shea, labor at fires 5.00 

H. L. Pellam, labor at fires 5.00 

Herald Job Print, printing for muster 33.50 

Muster Day, band and prizes 158.00 



22 



Edward H. Latham, baseball 

U. S. Rubber Co., 600 feet hose 

Geo. H. Newman, labor at fires 

Northampton Com. Body Co., painting h. wagon 

Fred Wentzel, hose wagon and fires 

John J. Betsold, hose wagon 

Thomas M. Day, hose wagon 

H. W. Marsh, hose wagon 

Kate Mullins, hose wagon 

C. H. Crafts, hose wagon 

Robert J. Graves, labor, fires 



SPECIAL REPAIRS 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor 

John L. Boyle, team and labor 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team and labor 

John F. O'Dea, team and labor 

Wm. C. Kingsley, team and labor. 

Thomas M. Day, team and labor 

Michael Dulaski, c. basin 

L. H. Kingsley, sand 

Howes Brick Co 

C. E. Warner, cement 

John Koblinski, labor 

Jacob Geis, labor 

John J. Breor, labor 

Chester Semkofski, labor 

Stanley Rogalewski, labor 

Stanley Hader, labor 

Peter Zagrodnik, labor 

D. P. Sheehan, truck and labor 



2,012.97 



23 

RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 

State Aid $ 48.00 

Hampshire County Sanatorium .- 94.50 

Poor— care of 1,803.97 

Old Bills 1,891.39 

Schools — Maintenances 34,960.14 

New School Building 15,038.19 

Town Officers 2,032.25 

Ordinary — Highways and Bridges. 3.445.77 

Contingencies •. 1,465.18 

Public Library 770.78 

Tree Warden 179.36 

Inspector of Animals 419.60 

Insurance 647.77 

Memorial Hall 156.35 

Street Lights 4,340.75 

Sewers 1,220.79 

Valley Street Road 1,002.55 

Repairing and patching stone roads 4,937.70 

Memorial Day 137.40 

Bonds— Town Officers 102.00 

Hampshire County Farm Bureau 150.00 

Smith's Industrial School 412.50 

Fire. Department 970.00 

Special 2,012.97 

Village Improvement Society 100.00 

Total ■ $ 78,339.91 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD R. BREOR, 
G. R. BILLINGS, 
JOHNF. O'DEA, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 

I have this day examined the books of the Selectmen and 
find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 9, 1922. 



24 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD— 1922 



Balise, Paul N. 
Bardwell, Fred T., 
Billings, Roswell G., 
Betsold, Frank L., 
Burke, William H., 
Crafts, Caryll M., 
Dickinson, William H., 
Dickinson, Edward N., 
Field, Samuel H., 
Graves, Murray B., 
Day, Edward J., 
Howard, Harry L., 
Morton, Gilbert E., 
Slattery, Charles F., 
Strong, Edson W., 
Smith, Herbert D., 
Smith, Adam J., 
Ryan, Edward A., 
Ryan, Matthew J., 
Wight, Leland H., 
Bardwell, Arthur C, 
Thomas, Mullany, 
Stowell, Charles J., 
Graves, Edwin L., 
Carl, Henry W., 
Chandler, Joseph F., 
Connelly, William P., 
Harris, Scott, 
Proulx, M. Larkin, 
Fitzgerald, David L., 



Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Insurance 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Merchant ■ 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Tax Collector 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in Account with the Town of 

Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To Balance in Treasury, $ 2,378.24 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1918) . . . 359.79 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1919. . . 1,278.50 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1920) . . . 16,405.85 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1921) . . . 40,482.28 

Treasurer Water Commissioners, 2,900.00 

District Court Fines, . 192.00 

Pool, slaughter, and auctioneers ' licenses 10.00 

Junk, fruit and State licenses 42.00 

Sealer's receipts 67.44 

Rent of Town Hall— janitor 118.25 

Rent of Smith Academy Hall 5.00 

Interest on deposits 369.56 

J. E. Porter, removing stump 6.00 

M. C. Wackerhagen, labor 3.00 

N. Y. N. H. Road, refund on freight 21.59 

Michael Dulaski, bag of cement 1.00 

W. H. Hadley, labor and gravel . . . 2.00 

A. R. Breor, proceeds of dance 52.00 

Hugh McLeod, labor, gravel and sand 14.64 

Roman Waskiewicz, wood sold 5.00 

H. L. Pellam, cemetery plot No. 124 .50 

Lawrence Waskiewicz, sewer entrance and tile. . 58.90 

Michael Yanos, sewer entrance and tile 65.90 

Thos. Karpenskie, sewer entrance and tile 60.30 

Stanley Oliesmki, sewer entrance and tile 59.60 



26 

John F. O'Dea, tile 13.64 

H. E. Graves, sewer entrance 33.00 

Clara L. Dickinson, sewer entrance and tile 171.98 

John H. Day, sewer entrance 33.00 

James L. Day, catch basin and rent schoolhouse. . 192.00 

Roswell Hubbard, labor on sewer 14.30 

Town of Whately, labor on roads 5.00 

County Treasurer, dog fund 158.26 

Town of Whately, tuition 1,215.00 

City of Northampton, tuition 469.00 

State— Mass. School Fund 1,432.94 

Income Tax — General School Fund 3,768.75 

City of Boston 71.25 

Inspection of animals 81.00 

Income tax 2,911.15 

Corporation tax 1.167.75 

Street Railway tax 46.54 

National Bank tax 785.48 

State aid 78.00 

Vocational education 165.74 

Subsidy— T. B. Cases 137.86 

From Smith Academy treasurer 2,722.28 

Cash from temporary loans : 

Northampton National Bank, note No. 4 40,000.00 

Northampton National Bank, note No. 5 30,000.00 

Northampton National Bank, note No. 6 and 7. . . 10,000.00 



$160,633.26 

Cr. 

By cash paid Selectmen's orders $ 78,339.91 

Interest on water bonds 2,000.00 

District Court fees 10^.94 

Director of accounts 8.00 

County tax 4,686.94 

State tax 6,300.00 

State Special tax 297.00 



'27 

State Highway tax 158.19 

Soldiers' exemption 6.30 

Civiliar war poll tax 2,181.00 

Treasurer sinking fund 918.00 

Interest on notes 1,935.00 

Balance in treasury 2,567.98 

Memorial Town Hall fund 3,000.00 

By cash paid outstanding notes : 

S. N. Bond & Co., note No. 3 25,000.00 

Northampton National Bank, note No. 5 30,000.00 

8th note and interest — New Schoolhouse 3,125.00 



$160,633.26 

TN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1918 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received $ 359.79 

Uncollected taxes 385.94 $ 745.73 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes $ 703.58 

Interest collected 42.15 745.73 

(1919 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received $1,278.50 

Uncollected taxes . 492.31 1,770.81 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes $1,672.45 

Interest collected 98.36 1,770.81 



28 

(1920 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $16,405.85 

Uncollected taxes 5,941.81 22,347.66 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes $22,039.35 

Interest collected 308.31 22,347.66 

(1921 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received $40,482.28 

Uncollected taxes 25,277.07 65,759.35 

Cr. 

By Assessors' warrant $65,669.45 

Addition to warrant 37.75 

Interest collected 52.15 65,759.35 

I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector, and 
find that he has been credited by the Treasurer with the 
amounts of $359.79 of the taxes of 1918,— $1,278.50 of the 
taxes of 1919,— $16,405.85 of the taxes of 1920, and $40,- 
482.28 of the taxes of 1921. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 9, 1922. 



WATER SINKING FUND. 

To thirty years four per cent. Water Bonds, $50,000.00 

By Sinking Fund 33,120.39 



29 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT. 

To Temporary note No. 4, due May, 1922 $40,000.00 

By uncollected taxes, (1918 385.94 

Uncollected taxes, (1919) 492.31 

Uncollected taxes, (1920) 5,941.81 

Uncollected taxes, (1921) 25,277.07 

Due from State aid 48.00 

Smith Industrial School 206.25 

Due from State subsidy 47.25 

Bills due 454.36 

Balance in Treasury 2,567.98 

Deposited in Savings Bank — Memorial Hall fund, 3,000.00 

Balance against the town 1,579.03 

$ 40,000.00 
Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer. 



I have examined the books and accounts of the Treas- 
urer of tlie town of Hatfield for the year ending December 
31, 1921, and find them correct. I find Selectmen's orders on 
file to the amount of Seventy-eight thousand, three hundred 
thirty-nine dollars, and ninety-one cents, — ($78,339.91) with 
evidence of their payment by him ; also, cancelled notes and 
receipts for County, and State Taxes, and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of Two Thousand, five 
hundred sixty-seven dollars and ninety-eight cents, — ($2,- 
567.98). Also, in savings Bank a deposit of ($3,000.00). 
January 9, 1922. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



30 

RESOURCES OF THE TOWN 

Real Estate 

Schoolhouse and site, School Street $6,000.00 

Tool House and site 1,500.00 

Sixty acres on "Rocks" 300.00 

Two acres Little Meadow Hollow 175.00 

Personal Property. 

Steam Roller $5,000.00 

Two road scrapers 125.00 

Water sprinkling cart . 250.00 

Road sweeper 250.00 

Two snow plows 150.00 

Spraying machine 25.00 

Tools, shovels, plows, etc 150.00 

3000 feet plank 120.00 

Mixed crushed stone 300.00 

Three bbls. K. P. Tarvia 100.00 

Metal culvert 50.00 

Outfit Sealers' Weights and Measures, 200.00 

Six fire' hose wagons 1,200.00 

Fire hose and ladders 600.00 

Four safes 500.00 



$ 7,975.00 









9,020.00 




$ 16,995.00 


PERPETUAL 


CARE CEMETERY FUNDS. 




Income 


Expense 


Balance 


Fund 


1921 


1921 


1921 


Hannah W. Smith, 


$12.00 


$10.00 


$32.38 


Augusta Wells, 


15.80 


30.00 


333.56 


Oliver Warner, 


2.28 


2.00 


50.62 


J. H. Sanderson, 


4.64 


4.00 


102.94 


Luman M. Moore, 


9.75 


8.00 


216.47 



31 



Abby Dickinson, 


4.23 


3.50 


93.88 


Lucy L. Morton, 


10.96 


4.00 


248.49 


Charles Smith, 


4.77 


4.00 


106.04 


Lemuel B. Field, 


4.75 


4.00 


105.61 


Rufus H. Cowles, 


4.82 


4.00 


106.86 


Chas. E. Hubbard, 


4.97 


4.00 


110.73 


Alpheus Cowles, 


4.68 


4.00 


103.88 


James Porter, 


4.33 


4.00 


102.05 


Daniel W. Allis, 


7.05 


5.00 


157.21 


J. H. Howard, 


4.55 


4.00 


101.23 


Fannie M. Burke, 


4.38 


4.00 


102.88 


C. S. Shattuck, 


4.38 


4.00 


102.76 


S. W. Kingsley, 


7.00 


4.00 


103.00 


E. S. Warner, 


7.57 


7.57 


200.00 


Reuben Belden, 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Theodore Porter, 


1.00 


1.00 


100.00 


Edward C. Billings, 


25.00 


25.00 


500.00 


C. Gr. Wilkie, for Library, 


175.18 




2,113.31 



REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

We have the following amounts deposited to the credit 
of the Sinking Fund : 

Amherst Savings Bank $ 1,223.31 

Easthampton Savings Bank 1,849.54 

Nonotuck Savings Bank 854.17 

Haydenville Savings Bank 1,305.65 

Florence Savings Bank 1,707.90 

Northampton Institution for Savings 984.85 

Springfield Institution for Savings 1,370.24 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank 1,390.92 

Union Trust Co., Springfield 2,997.69 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Holyoke 1,776.12 

N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. Bonds 2,000.00 

Springfield Street Railway Bonds 1,000.00 



32 

Boston & Maine Railroad Bonds 3,000.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad Coupons 660.00 

U. S. Liberty Bonds 2,000.00 

U. S. Victory Loan 2,000.00 

Hatfield Water Bonds . 7,000.00 



$ 33,120.39 

M. J. RYAN, 
ERCENT E. GODIN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

Sinking Fimd Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the vouchers and securities 
of the Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 9, 1922. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1921 are as follows : — 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 

No. Males Females 

January 10 ° 3 7 

February 11 7 4 

March 9 4 5 

April 10 7 3 

May 7 3 4 

June .10 7 3 

July 5 2 3 

August 5 2 3 

September 9 3 6 

October 4 3 1 

November 8 -7 1 

December 7 5 2 



95 53 

BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 

Father 

Born in United States 24 

Born in Poland 56 

Born in Austro-Hungary 5 

Born in Czecho-Slovakia 9 

Born in Newfoundland 1 

Born in Scotland 



42 



Mother 
27 
52 

5 
10 



1 



95 



95 



34 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1916 ' 1917 1918 1919 1920 

122 101 90 98 84 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 

January 2 

February 2 

March 

April 1 

May 2 

June ... - 3 

July 3 

August 

September 3 

October 1 

November # . 4 

December 1 

22 

First marriage of both parties 18 

Second of groom, first of bride 1 

Second of groom, second of bride 3 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 50 and 21 years of 

age, respectively. 
The oldest and youngest brides were 40 and 21 years of age, 

respectively. 

BIRTHPLACES OF PERSONS MARRIED 

Groom Bride 

Born in United States 9 13 

Born in Poland 12 9 

Born in New Brunswick 1 

22 22 



35 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1916 
29 



1917 

28 



1918 
14 



1919 
26 



1920 
17 



DEATHS BY MONTHS 

No. Males Females 

January 2 1 1 

February 1 1 

March 1 1 

April 5 4 1 

May 1 1 

June 1 1 

July 3 2 1 

August 3 3 

September 2 2 

October 3 2 1 

November 2 2 

December 5 3 2 



33 



19 



14 



No. 

Stillborn 9 

Under 1 year of age 1 

Between 1 and 10 years 5 

Between 10 and 20 years 2 

Between 20 and 30 years 1 

Between 30 and 40 years 3 

Between 40 and 50 years 

Between 50 and 60 years 2 

Between 60 and 70 years 5 

Between 70 and 80 years 2 

Between 80 and 90 years 3 



Males 


Fe 


males 


3 




6 







1 


4 




1 


1 




1 


1 







2 




1 










1 




1 


1 




4 


2 







2 




1 



33 



17 



16 



36 



AGE OF OLDEST PERSON DECEASED 

(Male) 86 years, 8 months, 8 days. 

NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



David Fitzgerald 
Jonathan E. Porter 
Maria J. Bardwell 
Emma M. Newman 
Rnfus H. Lamb 
Rose M. Atwood 
Angie B. Chase 
Sanford R. Sanderson 
George B. Steele 
Emma E. Belclen 
Nellie T. Waugh 
William F. Boyle 



Wojeich Bak 

Edwina Natorwicz 
Jean Atwood 
Frank Zagrodnik 
Edward Zirnehewicz 
Benjamin P. Dole 
Patrick R. Brennan 
Sigmond Michavoski 
Edward Vachula 
Walter H. Heiden 
Edward H. Billings 



DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending 
November 30, 1921, with the receipts and settlements of the 
accounts with the Treasurer, is a follows :— 

79 Male dogs at $2.00 each $ 158.00 

3 Female dogs at $5.00 each 15.00 

$ 173.00 
Less fees, 82 dogs at 20 cents each 16.40 

Paid to County Treasurer $ 156.60 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Town Clerk. 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed personal estate $ 433,553.00 

Value of assessed real estate . 2,047.825.00 

Total value of assessed estate $2,481,378.00 

Value of assessed buildings $1,074,793.00 

Value of assessed land 973,032.00 

$2,047,825.00 

Number of polls assessed. 727 

Residents assessed on property 438 

Non-residents assessed on property 72 

Number of persons assessed on property 510 

For poll tax only 408 

Rate of tax per $1,000.00 $25 

Number of horses assessed 392 

Number of cows 253 

Number of neat cattle 31 

Number of fowls 125 

Number of dwelling houses 431 

Acres of land 9220 

State tax $6,300.00 

State highway tax 158.19 

State special tax 297.00 

County tax 4,686.94 

Town tax 52,371.00 

Ovcrlayings 1,856.32 

$ 65,669.45 



38 

Estimated bank and corporation tax $ 1,300.00 

State income tax 5,000.00 

Addition to warrant 37.75 

Value of property exempt from taxation under 
Chapter 409, Acts of 1909 : 

Literary institutions $80,103.00 

Church property 46.200.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 

DEWEY J. RYAN, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



Report of Library Trustees 



The report of the librarian, covering the work of the 
library for the year is herewith submitted. 

MARGARET A. MULLANY, 
MARION BILLINGS, 
PETER L. BALISE, 

Library Trustees. 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library : 

This has beeu a year of increased activity in the Library. 
There has been a material gain in circulation both in the 
adult and in the juvenile departments. It is well to note 
that more books of non-fiction have been taken out than in 
previous years. 

The circulation for the year has been 12,882. Of these 
6,817 were juvenile books and magazines and 6,065 adult. 

In 1920 the total circulation was 9,565. 

We have added to the library 412 books; 400 by pur- 
chase and- 12 zy gift. Of these 195 were in the juvenile 
department. 

We are glad to cooperate with the public schools in 
every way possible in the interest of the pupils. Any sug- 
gestions by the teachers of books helpful in English or other 
studies are welcome. Mr. Richards has been most helpful 
in suggesting books for young children 

A new assignment of twenty-five books in the Polish 
language has just been received, loaned by the Department 
of Education. 

As usual, books have been circulated in Bradstreet in 
charge of Mrs. Laura Belden; in West Hatfield, in charge 
of Miss Carrie Cutter, and in North Hatfield in charge of 
Mr. G. H. Danforth. 

We have had the faithful, efficient assistance of Miss 
Margaret P. Ryan through the year. 

The library is open on Tuesdays from 3 to 5 P. M. and 
on Saturdays from 3 to 5 P. M. and 7 to 9 P. M. 



41 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

Balance from fines of 1920 $ .56 

Fines of 1921 17.10 

$ 

Supplies $ 2.93 

Books 10.63 

Postage, express, etc 3.95 

$ 

Balance on hand 

ELLEN A. WAITE, 

Librarian 



17.66 



17.51 
.15 



BOOKS ENTERED DURING 1921 



Fiction. 



The Mating of the Blades 

Success 

Sisters in Law 

The Gray Angels 

The Prodigal Village 

Rose o' the Sea 

Helen with the High Hand 

Flood Tide 

Harbor Road 

The Iron Trail 

Dodo Wonders 

Kit Musgrave's Luck 

Wilderness Mine 

Lister's Great Adventure 

Cow Country 

Journey's End 

The Girl in Fancy Dress 

House with Golden Windows 

The Son of Tarzan 



Achmed Abdullah 

Sam'l Hopkins Adams 

Gertrude Atherton 

Nalbro Bartley 

Irving Bacheller 

Countess Barcynska 

Arnold Bennett 

Sara Ware Bassett 

Sara Ware Bassett 

Rex Beach 

E. F. Benson 

Harold Bindloss 

Harold Bindloss 

Harold Bindloss 

B. M. Bower 

Edna A. Brown 

J. E. Buckrose 

J. E. Buckrose 

Edgar Rice Burroughs 



42 



The Shuttle 

The Jack-knife Man 

The Brimming Cup 

The Little Red Fool 

The Man Thou Gavest 

Mamselle Jo 

The Valley of Visions 

The Cricket 

Married 

The Flaming Forest 

The Golden Snare 

Nomads of the North 

The Gold Hunters 

The Grissley King 

Kenny 

Kingdom Around the Corner 

When Egypt Went Broke 

Greatheart 

The Hundredth Chance 

Bars of Iron 

The Tidal Wave 

The Obstacle Race 

The Moreton Mystery 

Far to Seek 

The Man in Gray 

The Book of Susan 

Tales of Sherlock Holmes 

The Mill on the Floss 

The Yellow Horde 

Martin Comsby's Vengeance 

This Side of Paradise 

Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come 

Dean Men's Money 

Miss Lulu Bett 

To Let 

Caliban 

Youth Triumphant 



Frances Hodgson Burnett 

Ellis Parker Butler 

Dorothy Canheld 

Robert W. Chambers 

Harriet Comstock 

Harriet Comstock 

Sarah Comstock 

Marjorie Benton Cooke 

Marjorie Benton Cooke 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

James Oliver Curwood 

Leona Dalrymple 

Coningsby Dawson 

Holman Day 

Ethel M. Dell 

Ethel M. Dell 

Ethel M. Dell 

Ethel M. Dell 

Ethel M. Dell 

Elizabeth Dejeans 

Maud Diver 

Thomas Dixon 

Lee Wilson Dodd 

A Conan Doyle 

George Eliot 

Hal G. Evarts 

Jeffery Farnol 

F. Scott Fitzgerald 

John Fox, Jr. 

J. S. Fletcher 

Zona Gale 

John Galsworthy 

W. L. George 

George Gibbs 



43 



The Vagrant Duke 

Beauty and Nick 

Desert Valley 

The Short Cut 

Man to Man 

The Desert of Wheat 

Wild Fire 

Betty Zane 

Light of the Western Stars 

The Rainbow Trail 

The U. P. Trail 

The Lone Star Ranger 

Allan Quart ermain 

Egan 

Through Mocking Bird Gap 

The Desert Fiddler 

Happily Married 

The Chivalry of Keith Leicester 

The Prisoner of Zenda 

Lucinda 

The Argyle Case 

Haffles 

If Winter Comes 

The Happy Warrior 

Seed of the Sun 

The Wasted Generation 

The Man Who Did the Right Thin{ 

The Girl in the Mirror 

Trouble-the-house 

The Blue Envelope 

Partners of Chance 

Cappy Ricks 

The Pride of Palomar 

Captain Scragg 

The Empty Sack 

Susan Claiborne 

Gahisha, the Magnificent 



George Gibbs 

Philip Gibbs 

Jackson Gregory 

Jackson Gregory 

Jackson Gregory 

Zane Grey 

Zane Grey 

Zane Grey 

Zane Grey 

Zane Grey 

Zane Grey 

Zane Grey 

H. Rider Haggard 

Halworthy Hall 

Jarvis Hall 

Wm. H. Hamby 

Corra Harris 

Rob't A. Hood 

Anthony Hope 

Anthony Hope 

Arthur Hornblow 

E. W. Hornung 

A. S. M. Hutchinson 

A. S. M. Hutchinson 

Wallace Trwin 

Owen Johnson 

Sir Harry Johnston 

Elizabeth Jordan 

Kate Jordan 

Sophie Kerr 

Henry Herbert Knibbs 

Peter B. Kyne 

Peter B. Kyne 

Peter B. Kyne 

Basil King 

Jennette Lee 

Joseph C. Lincoln 



44 



The Custard Cup 

The Mountebank 

The Tryst 

David Vallory 

The Fire Bringers 

Potterism 

Quill's Window 

The Drums of Jeopardy 

The Pagan Madonna 

The Crack in the Bell 

Penny of Tophill Trail 

The Hall and the Grange 

The Snowshoe Trail 

The Strength of the Pines 

Old Mam'selle's Secret 

Gold Elsie 

At the Villa Rose 

Yvette and Other Stories 

The Egoist 

Conrad in Quest of His Youth 

A Chair on the Boulevard 

Mary-Girl 

Manslaughter 

Through the Wall 

The Beloved Woman 

The Land of Last Chance 

Jacob's Ladder 

The Profiteers 

By the God's Beloved 

Pawned 

Wild Youth and Another 

The Mystery of the Silver Dagger 

The Hermit of Far End 

Beggar's Gold 

Sister Sue 

Just David 

A Girl of the Lumberlost 



Florence B. Livingston 

Win. J. Locke 

Grace Livingston Lutz 

Francis Lynde 

Francis Lynde 

Rose Macaulay 

Geo. Barr McCutcheon 

Harold MacGrath 

Harold MacGrath 

Peter Clark MacFarlane 

Belle K. Mania tes 

Archibald Marshall 

Edison Marshall 

Edison Marshall 

E. Marlitt 

E. Marlitt 

A. E. W. Mason 

Guy de Maupassant 

George Meredith 

Leonard Merrick 

Leonard Merrick 

Hope Merrick 

Alice Duer Miller 

Cleveland Moffett 

Kathleen Norris 

G. W. Ogden 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

E. Phillips Oppenheim 

Baroness Orczy 

Frank L. Packard 

Sir Gilbert Parker 

Randall Parrish 

Margaret Pedler 

Ernest Poole 

Eleanor H. Porter 

Eleanor H. Porter 

Gene Stratton Porter 



45 



Her Father's Daughter 

The Silent Bullet 

Green Valley 

Also Ran 

Quinn 

Smiles, a Rose of the Cumberland 

The Island 

The Silver Sixpence 

The Preacher of Cedar Mountain 

Ellen Levis 

The Time Spirit 

The Mountain Divide 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

The Prairie Mother 

Alice Adams 

Terry, a Tale of the Hill People 

Joanna Builds a Nest 

Adventures of Tom Sawyer 

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 

Tradition 

The Young Enchanted 

The Rose Dawn 

Ladies in "Waiting 

Goshen Street 

Benefits Forget 

The Enchanted Canyon 

The Wrong Twin 

The Little "Warrior 

The Indiscretions of Archie 

Helen of the Old House 

That Printer of Udells 

Children of Storm 

Rogues and Co. 

Miscellaneous 
The Happy Hunting Ground 
The New Europe 
An American's London 



Gene Stratton Porter 

Arthur B. Reeve 

Katharine Reynolds 

Mrs. Baillie Reynolds 

Alice Hegan Rice 

E. H. Robinson 

Bertha Runkle 

Ruth Sawyer 

Ernest Thomson Setan 

Elsie Singmaster 

J. C. Snaith 

Frank H. Spearman 

Harriet Beecher Stowe 

Arthur Stringer 

Booth Tarkington 

Chas. Goff Thomson 

Juliet W. Tompkins 

Mark Twain 

Mark Twain 

Marie Van Vorst 

Hugh Walpole 

Stewart Edward White 

Kate Douglas Wiggin 

Wayland W. Williams 

Honore Willsie 

Honore Willsie 

Harry Leon Wilson 

P. G. Wodehouse 

P. G. Wodehouse 

Harold Bell Wright 

Harold Bell Wright 

Ida A. R. Wylie 

Ida A. R. Wylie 

Kermit Roosevelt 

Nellie B. Allen 

Louise Closser Hale 



46 

United States of Our Own Times 1865-1920 Haworth 

The Peace Negotiations Rob't Lansing 

Le Petit Norcl Mrs. Wilfred Grenfell and Katie Spalding 
Adrift on an Ice Pan Wilfred T. Grenfell 

Classic Myths Charles Mills Gay ley 

Egypt, Greece and Rome Celia Richmond 

The Outline of History (2 vol.) H. G. Wells 

White Shadows in the South Seas Frederick O'Brien 

Working North from Patagonia Harry A. Franck 

Roosevelt in the Bad Lands Herman Hagedorn 

My Brother, Theodore Roosevelt 

Corrinne Roosevelt Robinson 
My Life Here and There 

Princess Cantacuzene nee Julia Grant 
The Making of an American Jacob Riis 

Crowding Memories Mrs. T. B. Aldrich 

Russell Conwell and His Work Agnes R. Burr 

Father Duffy's Story 

Francis P. Duffy, Chaplain of 165th Infantry 
Flying for France James R. McConnell 

Queen Victoria Lytton Strachey 

Great Modern American Stories Wm. Dean Howells 

Mirrors of Downing Street by a gentleman with a duster 
Mirrors of Washington 

People of Destiny Philip Gibbs 

Moral Education in School and Home J. 0. Engleman 

Education by Plays and Games Geo. E. Johnson 

Games for the Playground, School and Home 

Jessie H. Bancroft 
Elementary School Standards McMurry 

How to Study andTeaching How to Study McMurry 

Reaching the Children Henry C. Krebs 

Insects Injurious to the Household G. W. Herrick 

Four Years in the Underbrush 

God's Country James Oliver Curwood 

The Scarlet Letter Nathaniel Hawthorne 

Vanity Fair Wm. Makepeace Thackery 



47 



Gulliver's Travels Jonathan Swift 

Don Quixote (abridged) Cervantes 

Tales from Shakespeare Charles and Mary Lamb 

The Vicar of Wakefield . Oliver Goldsmith 

Paul and Virginia Bernardin de St. Pierre 

Dante's Divine Comedy 

The School for Scandal Richard B. Sheridan 

New England in France 26th Div. U. S. A. 

Taylor presented 
Songs from the Trenches 
Civics for New Americans 
The New Civics 

The Community and the Citizen 
American Social Problems 
American Citizenships 



H. A. Gibbons presented 
Mabel Hill presented 
R. S. Ashley presented 
A. W. Dunn presented 
Burch and Patterson presented 
Chas. A. Beard presented 
Productive Orcharding F. C. Sears, M. S. presented 

The Jews and American Ideals John Spargo presented 

The Next War Will Irwin presented 

Soldiers and Sailors of France in the war for Independence 

presented 
From Xylographs to Lead Molds A. D. 1440-A. D. 1921 

presented 



Juvenile Department 



The Guns of Europe 

The Border Watch 

The Forest Runners 

The Yonng Trailers 

The Eyes of the Woods 

Curly and the Aztic Gold 

Under Boy Scout Colors 

Marion Frear's Summer 

Left-tackle Thayer 

Three-base Benson 

Full-back Foster 

Hero Stories from Am. History 

The Boy Settlers 

Lost River 



Joseph A. Altsheler 

Joseph A. Altsheler 

Joseph A. Altsheler 

Joseph A. Altsheler 

Joseph A. Altsheler 

Joseph B. Ames 

Joseph B. Ames 

Margaret Ashmun 

Ralph H. Barbour 

Ralph H. Barbour 

Ralph H. Barbour 

Blaisdell & Ball 

Noah Brooks 

Allen Chaffee 



48 



The Deer Slayer James Fenimore Cooper 

Marjorie's Way Alice Turner Curtis 

Grandpa's Little Girls' Houseboat Party 

Alice Turner Curtis 
Grandpa's Little Girls at School ' Alice Turner Curtis 

Grandpa 's Little Girls and their Friends 

Alice Turner Curtis 



Stories of the Day's Work 




Davis & Getchell 


The Boy Scout 


Richard Harding Davis 


Polly of Lady Gay Cottage 




Emma C. Dowd 


The Secret Stairs 


Ellen Douglas Deland 


Real Stories from our History 




J. T. Faris 


Tom Slade on Mystery Trail 




Percy K. Fitzhugh 


The Poor Little Rich Girl 




Eleanor Gates 


Helen and the Fifth Cousin 




Beth B. Gilchrist 


Felicia 


Elizabeth Lincoln Gould 


Felicia's Friends 


Elizabeth Lincoln Gould 


Bouncing Bet 




Joslyn Grey 


The Young Lion Hunter 




Zane Grey 


The Young Forester 




Zane Grey 


Jack the Young Ranchman 




Geo. B. Grinnell 


The Mutineers 


Chas 


i. Boardman Hawes 


The Young Midshipman 




G. A. Henty 


The Young Colonist 




G. A. Henty 


By Dike and Dyke 




G. A. Henty 


Redskin and Cowboy 




G. A. Henty 


High Benton Worker 




Win. Heyliger 


Lessons for Junior Citizens 




Mabel Hill 


Tom Brown's Schooldays 




Thomas Hughes 


Bluebonnet Keeps House 




Jacobs & Richards 


The Litle Colonel at Boarding School 


Annie F. Johnston 


Stover at Yale 




Owen Johnson 


Our Bird Comrades 




Leander Keyser 


The Luck of Denewood 


E. 


B. & A. A. Knipe 


The Lucky Sixpence 


E. 


B. & A. A. Knipe 


Triumphs of Science 




M. A. L. Lane 


Story of Columbus and Magellan 




T. B. Lawler 



49 



Wood Folks at School 

Pitcher Pollock 

Sergeant Jane 

"When Oriole Came to Harbor Light 

The First Book of Birds 

Rilla of Ingleside 

Chronicles of Avonlea 

The Italian Twins 

The Dutch Twins 

The Belgian Twins 

Six Star Ranch 

The Backwoods Men 

King of the Golden River 

From Tenderfoot to Scout 

Three Sides of Paradise Green 

The Girl Next Door 

The Sapphire Signet 

Stories of the Ancient Greeks 

The Browns 

More Good Times at Hackmatack 

Jolly Good Times at School 

The Annes 

Letters from Colonial Children 

Betty Wales, Freshman 

Star Stories 

Young Skippers of the Great Lakes 

Marjorie's Vacation 

Marjorie's New Friend 

Best Short Stories 

Stories of Wakeland and Dreamland 

Stories of Great Adventure 

Folk Stories and Fables 

Once Upon a Time Stories 

Boys and Girls of Colonial Days 

Hiro Stories (two copies) 

Everyday Stories 

Three Little Pigs 



Wm. J. Long 

Christy Mathewson 

Margaret M. Matlock 

Amy B. Marlowe 

Olive Thome Miller 

L. M. Montgomerjr 

L. M. Montgomery 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 

Eleanor H. Porter 

Chas. G. D. Roberts 

John Ruskin 

A. C. Ruddy 

Augusta H. Seaman 

Augusta H. Seaman 

Augusta H. Seaman 

Chas. D. Shaw 

Mary P. Wells Smith 

Mary P. Wells Smith 

Mary P. Wells Smith 

Marion Ames Taggart 

Eva March Tappan 

Margaret Warde 

Gertrude C. Warner 

Hugh C. Weir 

Carolyn Wells 

Carolyn Wells 

Sam'l B.Allison 

Anne E. Allen 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Frances Beem 



50 



Thornton W. 
Thornton "W. 

M. 

M. 



Rhymes and Tales for Children Mary Frances Blaisdell 
Boy Blue and His Friends Mary Frances Blaisdell 

Nancy in the Woods Marion Bryce 

Mother Westwind's Animal Friends Thornton W. Burgess 
Mother "Westwind's Children Thornton W. 

Adventures of Johnny Chuck Thornton W. 

Adventures of Danny Meadow Mouse 

Thornton W 
Adventures of Johnny Skunk 
Old Granny Fox 
Panther Stories 
Stories of Brave Dogs 
Adventures of Grillo 
Twingley Eyes at Valley Farm 
Twingley Eyes and the Lone Lake Folks 
Little Folks in Many Lands 
Paddy Paws 

Going to School in Animal Land 
Tell it Again Stories 
Story of the Early Sea People 
Fairy Gold Series — (2 books) 
Colliery Jim 
The Kinderkins 

How the Animals Came to the Circus 
Rick and Ruddy 
Loraine and the Little People 
Loraine and the Little People of Spring 
Japanese Fairy Tales 
Cinderella 

Bobbsey Twins at Cedar Camp 
Bobbsey Twins on the Deep Blue Sea 
Quaint Old Stories 
Book of Romance 
The Sleeping Beauty 
Jack the Giant Killer 
Cinderella 
Little Wild Rose 



Burgess 
Burgess 

Burgess 

Burgess 

Burgess 

H. Carter 

H. Carter 

Ernest Candeze 

Allen Chaffee 

Allen Chaffee 

Lulu M. Chance 

Grace Coolidge 

Julia D. Cowles 

Dillingham & Emerson 

Katharine Dopp 



Nora J. Finch 
Frances M. Fox 
E. Gale 
Howard K. Garis 
Elizabeth Gordan 
Elizabeth Gordan 
Lafcadio Hearn 
Alice C. Henderson 
Laura Lee Hope 
Laura Lee Hope 
Marion F. Lansing 
Andrew Lang 
Andrew Lang- 
Andrew Lang- 
Andrew Lang- 
Andrew Lang 



51 



Beauty and the Beast 

Aladdin and Other Stories 

Nonsense A. B. C. 

Peter and Dolly in Spring 

Peter and Dolly in Summer 

Peter and Dolly in Autumn 

Peter and Dolly in Winter 

Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know 



Andrew Lang- 
Andrew Lang 
Edward Lear 
Rose Lucia 
Rose Lucia 
Rose Lucia 
Rose Lucia 
Hamilton Mabie 



Will o' the Wasp 

Ab. the Cave Man 

Wee Aim 

Turdy and Timothy 

Book of Legends 

Book of Fables 

Black Beauty 

Tommy Smith at the Zoo 

Tommy Smith Again at the Zoo 

Bobby Bubbles 

Hawk Eye 

Little Bear 

Seventeen Little Bears 

Bunny Bright Eyes 

Children's Favorite Stories 

The Golden Goose 

Adv. of Tommy Tad and Dolly Wog 

Easy Stories 

Nursery Tales 

War of the Wooden Soldiers 

Dotty Dollie's Teaparty 

By-lo Series (5 books) 

The Bear Family at Home 

The Goody, Naughty Book 

American Readers, books one, two, three 

Beacon Primer and second reader 

Blodgett's First, Second and Third Readers 

Browne Readers, books I, II, III 

Cyr's Primer; First Reader; Dramatic First 



Margaret W. Morley 

Adapted by Wm. L. Nida 

Ethel C. Phillips 

Bertha C. Porter 

Horace E. Scudder 

Horace E. Scudder 

Anna Sewell 

Edmund Selous 

Edmund Selous 

E. Hugh SherAvood 

Laura K. Smith 

Laura K. Smith 

Laura K. Smith 

Laura K. Smith 

Laura K. Smith 

Eva March Tappan 

E. H. Trick 

E. A. Turner 

L. L. Weedon 

M. L. & W. C. Wheeler 

M. L. & W. C. Wheeler 

Blanche Fisher Wright 

Curtis D. Wilbur 

Sarah C. Rippey 



52 

Eugene Field Reader 

The Fairy Reader James Baldwin 

Rob't Louis Stevenson Reader 

Robinson Brusoe Reader 

Folk Lore Readers I, II, III 

Hill Readers I, II, III 

Jones Readers I, II, III 

Story Hour Readers I, II, III 

Magee ReadersI and II 

Wade and Sylvester I and II 

Winston Readers I and II 

Magazines and Periodicals 
Harper's Magazine 
American Magazine 
Everybody's Magazine 
Good Housekeeping 
National Geographic 
Popular Mechanics 
World's Work 
Review of Reviews 
Saint Nicholas 
Boys' Life 
The American Boy 
John Martins 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the Twenty- 
Fifth Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows : — 

Balance on deposit from last year's account. ... $ 2,947.69 

Certificate of deposit 1,800.00 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

One Victory Bond 1,000.00 

Cash from collection of Water Rates 5,318.75 

Interest on deposits 127.82 

Interest on Victory and Liberty Bonds . . ., 180.00 

Interest from Savings Banks 48.75 

From F. G. Howard, hydrants, ipe, etc 403.25 

From Standard Oil Co., breaking hydrant 20.00 

$ 12,846.26 

We have paid out the past year as follows : — 

Town of Hatfield $ 2,900.00 

Salaries of Water Commissioners .... 100.00 

E. W. Strong, collections, labor and 

cash paid 408.81 

W. H. Riley & Co., labor and material. 127.33 

S. W. Kingsley, labor 43.50 

F. M. Crittenden, printing 12.00 

Norwood Eng. Co., service boxes 54.00 

Northampton W. Works, material and 

labor 443.12 

$ 4,088.76 



54 

Balance in Treasury : 

Cash on deposit $ 2,151.98 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

One Victory Bond 1,000.00 

Dep. Amherst Savings Bank 1,537.50 

Dep. Northampton Inst, for Savings. . 1,011.25 

Dep. Northampton Nat'l Bank 2,056.77 



,757.50 



$ 12,846.26 



Eespectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. KTLEY, 
ROSWELL G. BILLINOK. 
L. A. DEINLEIN, 

Water Com missioners. 

I have this day examined the hooks and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the town of Hat- 
field and find them correct, with vouchers on file for all 
payments made, and a balance in the Treasury of $8,757.50 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 17, 1922. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1921 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Rev. Thomas B. Cunningham, Chairman, Term expires 1923 
Adam J. Smith, Secretary, Term expires 1922 

Oscar E. Bel den. Term expires 1924 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
38 North Elm Street, Northampton Telephone 1202-R 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield schools) 
C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet, and West Hatfield 
schools). 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Arthur R. Breor 





SCHOOL CENSUS 








April ] 


L, 1921 










Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Between 5 and 7 




68 


73 


141 


Between 7 and 14 




240 


208 


448 


Between 14 and 16 




51 


42 


93 



Totals 359 323 682 



58 



SCHOOL CALENDARS 



Elementary School 



Fall Term — 15 weeks 
1st Winter Term — 7 weeks 
2nd Winter Term — 8 weeks 
Spring Term — 7 weeks 
Fall Term — 15 weeks 
First Winter Term 

Smith Academy 



Opens— September 12, 1921 
Closes— December 23, 1921 
Opens — January 3, 1922 
Closes— February 17, 1922 
Opens— February 27, 1922 
Closes— April 21, 1922 
Opens— May 1, 1922 
Closes— June 16, 1922 
Opens— September 11, 1922 
Closes— December 22, 1922 
Opens — January 2, 1923 



Fall Term — 15 weeks 
Winter Term — 12 weeks 
Sx>ring Term — 11 weeks 
Fall Term — 15 weeks 
Winter Term — 



Opens— September 12, 1921 
Closes— December 23, 1921 
Opens — January 3, 1922 
Closes— March 24, 1922 
Opens— April 3, 1922 
Closes— June 15, 1922 
Opens— September 11, 1922 
Closes— December 22, 1922 
Opens — January 2, 1923 



Report of School Committee 



During the past year much has been done to better our 
schools. 

Superintendent C. J. Richards, who took charge early 
in the year, has labored faithfully to bring about a very 
satisfactory condition, both as to system and morale. 

March 1st Smith Academy became the town High 
School. This change has worked to the advantage of our 
school system. By vote of the town a state-aided agricul- 
tural department was established in the High School. This 
department should appeal to many of our boys who other- 
wise would leave school after the eighth grade. 

Extensive repairs were made on the school building at 
North Hatfield. These repairs were imperative. Minor 
repairs were made at Bradstreet and the Hill. 

A committee, comprising the members of the School 
Board and Messrs. J. J. Bestold, "William Cutter and James 
Mullins, was commissioned by vote of the last town meeting 
to erect a new school building at West Hatfield for a sum 
not exceeding $15,000. This building has been erected and 
furnished within the appropriation. Additional play ground 
has been furnished by purchase of the land in the rear of 
the old property extending to the New Haven Railroad. 
We commend the civic spirit of those citizens of West Hat- 
field who graded the school grounds without expense to 
the town. 

THOS. B. CUNNINGHAM, 
ADAM J. SMITH, 
OSCAR E. BELDEN. 



Financial Statement 



For Fiscal Year Ending Dec. 31, 1921 
RECEIPTS 
From State : 

General School Fund $3,768.75 

Massachusetts School Fund 1,432.94 

■ ■$ 5,201.69 

Tuition : 

Northampton for 1920 and 1921 $ 469.00 

Whately for 1920 and 1921 1,215.00 

Boston City Wards 71.25 

1,755.25 

Town Appropriation 25,000.00 

Academy Trustees 2,722.28 

Dog Fund 158.26 



$ 34,837.48. 
EXPENDITURES 
Salaries : 

Teachers $ 22,464.07 

Janitors 2,426.00 

Supervisor 642.00 

Superintendent of Schools 1,278.75 

-$ 26,810.82 

Books and Supplies 1,953.95 

Fuel 3,215.24 

Repairs 1,791.59 

Transportation 106.30 

Miscellaneous 1,082.24 

$ 34.960.14 

Reimbursements amounting to more than $1,200.00 are 

clue from the State on the 1921 school account, This will 

provide for the payment of some unpaid bills carried over 

to 1922. 



REPORT OF 

Superintendent of Schools 



On resuming my duties in this District after an absence 
of about three years, I find some changes, and a variety of 
unfinished plans and new problems. Frequent changes in 
administration generally cause some confusion and loss, 
regardless of the quality of the service rendered. This has 
also been the period of reorganization and adjustment fol- 
lowing the great war, which has affected unfavorably the 
work of the schools as well as most other institutions and 
industries. 

Schools should be organized and carried on with refer- 
ence first and always to the welfare of the pupils. All 
school activities and surroundings should be judged by this 
standard, and on its acceptance and intelligent application 
will depend in large measure the successful operaticn of any 
school system. This should be the standard not only of the 
school officials, who are' directly responsible, but they must 
have the support and cooperation of all good citizens in their 
efforts. It is only because the people of Hatfield have given 
their loyal support to plans for school improvement that 
progress has been possible, and that there is hope for its 
continuance. 

BUILDINGS AND ENROLLMENT 

The new two-room building at West 11a I held was opened 
for use last September and is proving very satisfactory, lis 
attractive appearance and substantia] workmanship reflect 
much credit on the architect, contractor, and building com- 
mittee. 



62 

The situation in the North Hatfield schools during the 
school year ending June, 1921 was entirely unsatisfactory 
owing chiefly to the crowded conditions. About thirty 
Whately pupils were enrolled during the year. The school 
authorities of that town are now providing for the schooling 
of: these children in their own town. There now remain 
about sixty Hatfield children, which is nearly as many as 
the building can accommodate. 

The North Hatfield building has been repaired through- 
out and electric lights installed. The sanitary arrangements, 
however, are unsatisfactory. At some time in the future the 
town will need to consider plans for a radical alteration of 
this building or for a new one to replace it. 

By reference to the enrollment table it will be seen that 
there were at the Center building last October three hun- 
dred twenty children, or an average of forty for each room. 
No teacher can render her best service for more than thirty- 
five pupils. Unless there should be some unexpected de- 
crease in the population of the town, it is likely that next 
year there will be an increase of thirty or more in the num- 
ber of children of school age to attend the village schools. 
Both the Hill and Center schools are filled to their capacity. 
and some plan should be made for caring for the probable 
increase, unless we wish to repeat the experience of a few 
years ago, before the erection of the Center building, when 
the children of several grades were receiving only half-time 
instruction. 

If at any time the number of pupils in the Bradstreet 
school should increase beyond the capacity of the building 
it might be necessary to transport the older ones to the vil- 
lage schools. This possibility should also be taken into ac- 
count in making any plans for additional housing at the 
village. 



63 

SMITH ACADEMY 

On March first 1921, the Trustees of Smith Academy 
turned over the control of that institution to the town 
authorities, and it has been recognized by the State Depart- 
ment as the Public High School of Hatfield. Similar action 
lias been taken by the trustees of most of the old time acade- 
mies in the State, including such schools as Hopkins in 
Hadley, Arms in Shelburne Falls, Powers in Bernardston, 
and Sanderson in Ashfield. The movement represents a 
healthful tendency to place the education of our young 
people under public rather than private control. The owner- 
ship of the building and control of endowment funds still 
remain in the hands of the Academy Trustees, but they will 
contribute toward the support of the school and necessary 
repairs. 

Extensive changes and repairs have been made to pro- 
vide for the growth of the school and to furnish suitable 
quarters for the various departments needed for a modern 
high school. 

Excellent w r ork is being done by teachers in al! depart- 
ments under the direction of Principal Wilcox to whom 
much credit is due for the general improvement of the school. 

TEACHERS 

It cannot be emphasized too much nor too often [hat in 
building up and carrying on a successful school system, the 
one most important condition is to secure and retain trained 
and efficient teachers. Buildings, books, equipment, super- 
vision, and courses of study are necessary adjuncts, but are 
of secondary importance. A school may have all these and 
yet be a failure for lack of an efficient teacher. Recent state 
legislation for school improvement has recognized these 
facts, and has provided for considerably higher salaries than 
were formerly paid in the smaller towns, in order to retain 
capable teachers and to attract others into the profession 
who were being drawn into other lines of work by the larger 
salaries and apparently easier requirements. 



64 

Several teachers resigned at the end of the school year 
inm June, but their places hav been filled quite satisfactorily. 
All of our present force have had either successful experi- 
ence, or a full course of normal school training, or both, and 
are working faithfully with a good degree of intelligence 
and success. 

All educators agree that a part at least of the high 
school instructors should be men. It is nearly, if not quite. 
as important that men as well as women should be provided 
as teachers for the older boys and girls of the elementary 
schools. This policy is being carried out in part this year in 
the employment of a man as Principal of the Center school. 

Our greatest difficulty in securing and retaining de- 
sirable teachers from out of town consists in finding suitable 
boarding places at prices which the teachers can afford to 
pay. 

The following is quoted from the report of a super- 
intendent who has evidently had similar difficulties : 

"As a rule the people who have the most comfortable 
places for teachers will not board them. Last year one dis- 
trict under my supervision lost an excellent teacher because 
she had to board almost two miles from the school. In that 
same district there are three very comfortable homes within 
two-hundred yards of the school house, and in not one of 
the three could I engage accommodations for a teacher just 
because the people didn't 'want to bother'. I had another 
case where a teacher resigned a position and accepted one 
in another town that paid a much smaller salary for the 
simple reason that the school building and boarding place 
in my district were much inferior to the accommodations in 
the other town. Now in order to have a good rural school 
someone in the precinct must be public spirited enough to 
do something for the good of the school. The school com- 
mittee and superintendent cannot do it all." 

Without doubt all who have had experience in looking 
up boarding places for teachers will heartily agree with this 



65 

superintendent's conclusions. The efficiency of a teacher 
depends so largely on having comfortable and homelike 
surroundings, that one of the most helpful things the people 
of any community can do for their schools is to assist in pro- 
viding desirable boarding places for their teachers. 

INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 

Any system of instruction is defective which does not 
provide special instruction for the exceptional child, or for 
the one who on account of absence or other causes is falling 
behind in his work. A teacher of unusual ability who 
understands children and is familiar with the subjects 
taught in the different grades is needed for this work, and 
we are fortunate in securing Mrs. Mary B. Powers who, in 
addition to her duties as Assistant Principal of the Center 
school, is giving special instruction as needed to individuals 
and groups. 

This special or individual help is given not only to those 
pupils who have failed to grasp some part of the regular 
class instruction, but also to the smaller number of children 
who can learn more readily than the average, and who, with 
a litle extra instruction, could be advanced a grade without 
omitting any essential subject. In either case the pupil 
saves a year's time, and does not feel the discouragement 
and lack of interest that come when one is retarded, or when 
he is not working on a plane with his maturity and natural 
ability. 

Even from a financial point of view, the employment of 
such a teacher for full time would be justifiable if through 
her efforts twenty-five children were each year saved a year's 
time in the completion of the elementary school course, 
since this would be the equivalent of the work of a regular 
teacher. The larger values, however, of this work with spec- 
ial pupils or classes, are to be found in the improvement of 
the individuals and the more satisfactory work that can be 
done by all pupils in the classrooms of the regular teachers 



66 

when the causes of retardation and discouragement are be- 
ing removed. 

SUPERVISORS 

The need of special teachers or supervisors of music, 
drawing, and handwriting is generally recognized. The im- 
portance of these subjects in all courses of study is univer- 
sally conceded, but it has been found that most teachers do 
not teach them satisfactorily without the help of expert 
supervision. 

Because of Miss Boyle's local interests we have been 
able to retain for several years the services of an efficient 
supervisor of music, but we have not been so fortunate in 
regard to drawing and handwriting. Competent supervisors 
for towns of the size of Hatfield can usually be secured only 
by union with other towns. We have so far this year been 
unable to make such a combination, but hope to have better 
success next year. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

All elementary school teachers have been given a re- 
vision in manuscript form of the Course of Study which was 
used as the basis of school work in this district from 1911 to 
1918. This also contains several pages of general sugges- 
tions and directions relating to organization and manage- 
ment. A textbook outline has also been prepared to accom- 
pany this course. 

Most high school teachers will agree that a thorough 
knowledge of those subjects usually taught in elementary 
schools gives a better preparation for high school than a 
smattering of several high school subjects. As far as prac- 
ticable, opportunity for "try-outs" in language, manual 
training, domestic science, and gardening should be given, 
but these should be introduced not as substitutes for the 
regular subjects but as complementary to them. 



67 

The results of recent experiments seem to indicate that 
it is wiser to continue the study of the regular subjects 
throughout the elementary grades than to substitute others 
which are usually taught in the Jiigh school. It is neither 
psychological nor practical for a child in the grades to ex- 
change geography for French or Latin, nor to neglect the 
fundamentals of arithmetic for the formal study of algebra 
and geometry. Dougtless there is need in the upper grades 
of most elementary schools for modifications in subject mat- 
ter, including both eliminations and substitutions. But to 
"bridge the gap" between the grades and the high school 
depends more on the organization of the work and the meth- 
od of its presentation than on any radical changes in sub- 
jects. 

Instruction in Practical Arts should be encouraged. 
This includes work in gardening, care of animals, wood, 
metal, or paper construction, cooking, sewing, and other 
forms of handwork. These activities are valuable not only 
as a basis for instruction in the usual school subjects, but 
because they lead to a right attitude toward manual labor 
in the home and on the farm, and afford opportunities for 
the pupils to develop ingenuity and self-reliance. They also 
help pupils to "find themselves" — to discover their powers 
and aptitudes — and thus to select more wisely the studies 
and lines of work for which they are best fitted. 

Very creditable work has been done by several of our 
boys and girls in connection with the various practical arts 
clubs managed by the Agricultural Societies and the County 
Farm Bureau. These clubs, however, are confined to a limit- 
ed number. Other opportunities for practical work in home 
and school should be afforded that would be used by a larger 
number of pupils. Home and school gardening seems to ap- 
peal to most normal children of the elementary school age, 
and when properly supervised and carried on, has social and 
economic as well as educational values. 



68 

TEXTBOOKS 

Books are essential tools in the educational process, and 
should be the best obtainable. They not only furnish much 
of the material for the pupils' daily tasks, but help in the 
formation of his habits and tastes. It has been found neces- 
sary to buy a large number of books during the past year in 
order to supply the deficiency in essential subjects; and a 
considerable number must also be bought this year if flic 
schools are to be adequately supplied. 

Frye's New Geographies have been introduced in all 
grammar grades throughout the town. Our recent national 
experiences have shown us the need of a knowledge of other 
lands and peoples as well as our own. Geography is recog- 
nized as one of the most interesting and practical of subjects. 
The text adopted emphasizes the rational method of teach- 
ing, and depends less upon the memory and more upon the 
judgment, than was the case with the geographies formerly 
used. 

The MeFadden Language books are being introduced in 
the middle grades, and the Horn-Ashbaugh speller in all 
grades above the second. ■ 

The Aldine Eevised Readers are being gradually sub- 
stituted for the old series as these need replacing. 

There should be a change in the histories now in use, 
and more physiologies, arithmetics, and primary reading- 
books are needed. 

HEALTH 

Good health is fundamental to success in any field of 
effort. Its importance is becoming more generally recog- 
nized, and the public schools are required to teach its essen- 
tials. It involves not merely freedom from sickness, but a 
reserve force of strength and energy to meet any emergen- 
cies that may arise. The conditions surrounding children 



69 

while in school should be such as to assist in building up this 
reserve of bodily vigor, at the same time that they are gain- 
ing in knowledge and mental discipline. 

Annual medical examinations of all pupils are now 
required. A more frequent inspection would be desirable. 
This should involve not only medical inspection of pupils, 
but also an examination as to the healthfulness of their sur- 
roundings, and suggestions for improvement. 

The Legislature of 1921 passed a law requiring towns 
to employ school nurses. There is no question as to the 
wisdom of this requirement and the advantages that will 
result from its operation. The law also provides that towns 
may unite in the employment of a school nurse. This matter 
will .be brought before the Joint Committee of this District, 
and it is hoped that favorable action will be taken. 

Comparatively few persons realize the large number of 
serious defects and illnesses which may be directly traced to 
defective teeth. Many towns have found that an annual 
dental inspection of all pupils, followed by recommendations 
to parents as to treatment needed, has resulted in the correc- 
tion of most of the defects. The town of Hadley has pursued 
this method for several years with excellent results. The 
school nurse in that town also follows up any serious cases 
and explains the need of treatment to parents. A Red Cross 
fund sufficient to pay one-half of the expense for the first 
year is now available for this work in Hatfield. 

Physical training in some form is now among the sub- 
jects in which instruction is required in all public schools. 
All our teachers have been requested to give physical exer- 
cises daily, including deep breathing and setting-up exer- 
cises. Especially good work along this line is being done by 
Mr. Bailey, Principal of the Center school. 

Our main reliance in promoting the health of school 
children is the regular instruction which is given in alf 
grades in the principles and practice of hygienic living. Oral 



70 

instruction is given in the lower grades, and this is supple- 
mented in the middle and upper grades by the use of appro- 
priate textbooks. 

CONCLUSION 

Maine's motto is "Dirigo" — -"I lead." This slate is 
now leading in a movement to enrich and uplift country life 
through better schools. Following are some significant 
items in Maine's educational program: 

"At least eighty per cent of the pupils through the 
elementary schools, and sixty per cent through the high 
school." 

"A complete system of local supervision by means of 
supervisors and visiting teachers." 

"The country school must be made as good as the- city 
school." 

"There should be a well-prepared teacher for every 
school." 

"A minimum salary of $1,200 for all prepared teachers. " 

"A diversified course of study, and proper buildings and 
equipment for all schools, with special appeal to as large a 
number of pupils as possible." 

"Through instruction in the essentials of an English 
education, including proper instruction in citizenship." 

"A square deal for the teacher, and more sympathetic 
consideration for her welfare." 

This program recognizes that education is the greatest 
resource of any state or community. It is the only means by 
which we can reach every child and impart not only useful 
knowledge, but what is more important, those principles and 
ideals which make for good citizenship. 

Is this program too ambitious for the consideration of 
any progressive and prosperous Massachusetts town? 

CLINTON J. RICHARDS. 



REPORT OF 

Principal of Smith Academy 



1 herewith submit my first report as Principal of Smith 
Academy which will also be the first report of Smith 
Academy as the High School of the Toavii of Hatfield. 

Iu June, 1921, the Academy graduated a class of eight, 
six girls and two boys. Of this number two have entered 
college and five more are continuing their studies at various 
institutions of learning. The school has been put in class 
"A" among schools having certificate privilege to the 
normal schools of the state and has also received the certifi- 
cate privilege for another year from the New England Col- 
lege Entrance Board which allows a student who has been 
doing good work in the high school to enter certain colleges 
without taking the regular college entrance examinations. 
Among the colleges belonging to this bo'ard are the follow- 
ing : Amherst, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Bowdoin, 
Tufts, Wesleyan, Middlebury, Brown, Colby, Williams and 
Bates. Thus the school is recognized by college and state 
authorities as preparing for advanced schools and it rests 
with the individual pupil to avail himself to the fullest ex- 
tent of these privileges and to do work in the Academy 
which will be somewhat above the average if he wishes to 
enter these schools upon our recommendation. 

During the summer extensive improvements were made 
in the Academy building. A portion of the girls' basement 
was partitioned off and has been fitted up as a kitchen for 
the Household Arts work. A coal range was installed here 
so that the girls can now cook under conditions such as they 
would have at home. Another part of the first floor, for- 
merly used as a chemistry laboratory, was renovated and 



72 

remodeled for use as the Agricultural room aud has proved 
to be very satisfactory. On the main floor a partition be- 
tween two small rooms was removed, thus making a large 
room which will accommodate our classes which are rapid!;, 
increasing in size. This last room has been planned as a 
Physics laboratory and is proving to be very well adapted 
to this purpose in this course which has been re-established 
this year. On the third floor two small rooms, formerly used 
only for storage purposes, have this year been put to use 
and are serving as a principal's office and supply room. In 
the fall it was found that the heating system would have to 
be thoroughly overhauled and more radiation added. This 
was done and as result the rooms are much warmer al- 
though there is still a chance for some improvement in this 
direction. 

In September the Academy opened its doors for its first 
year as the High School of the town with an enrollment of 
eighty pupils which was an increase of eighteen from the 
September enrollment of the previous year. With a small 
graduating class this year and a large entering class from 
the grammar school it seems altogether likely that the enroll- 
ment for September 1922 will approach one hundred. This 
will severely tax the seating capacity of our recitation rooms, 
in which case it may be found necessary to use the Assembly 
Hall for a recitation room and will mean that this room will 
have to be heated the entire year. 

The course of studies has been somewhat remodeled to 
conform with college entrance requirements and also to offer 
as much vocational work as possible. An outline of the 
course of studies has been printed and is available for dis- 
tribution to any who are interested. The Vocational work 
as present consists of Household Arts work for the girls and 
Agriculture for the boys. In the Household Arts course the 
girls devote one half of their time to work in the kitchen 
while the other half is given up to regular academic work, 
English being required of every student together with some 
other subject such as Biology, History or Civics. In the 



73 . 

kitchen approximately one half of their time is devoted to 
cooking and one half to sewing. In the cooking the work is 
centered upon the preparation and serving of three simple 
meals a day. In the sewing, the work aims to prepare the 
girls to solve their own individual clothing problems. The 
new Agricultural course has already proved its value. The 
boys devote one half of their time to the regular academic 
studies and one half to the vocational agricultural work. 
Each boy has a project such as the raising of a steer to com- 
pete in the baby beef contests at the Eastern States Exposi- 
tion or keeps poultry, a cow or a pig. In the spring some 
may adopt field projects such as the entire management of 
a small field of onions. The boys have shown themselves to 
be vitally interested in this work and where a certain type 
of boy is apt to just drift along from day to day if he is 
taking entirely academic studies, this same type becomes 
alert and wide awake and makes rapid strides forward in 
vocational work. Generally the boy can also see the value 
of his English, Mathematics and Science as applied to his 
project work and will do much better in these academic 
studies than he ever did before. The Agricultural Course 
brings the school into contact with the Agricultural College 
and with other state authorities which is a valuable thing 
for the town as a whole. An advisory committee for the 
Agricultural Department has been appointed consisting of 
seven men taken from various parts of the town. This com- 
mittee has had one meeting and meetings are planned to be 
held in the future every two months. 

* The school carries on many activities aside from the 
regular school routine, which are valuable and tend to make 
better citizens of our boys and girls. Athletics occupy a 
very important place in any school and physical training is 
now required by state law. The boys are engaged in some 
form of sport at all times of the year : soccer, track, basket- 
ball and baseball all find a place in our school calendar. We 
are competing continually with larger schools but still are 
able to give a good account of ourselves and last year the 



74 i 

basketball team brought honor to the school by winning the 
cup of the Hampshire League. We endeavor to interest as 
many boys as possible in athletics and last fall every boy in 
school played soccer or engaged in track work, while basket- 
ball is bringing out about 80% of the boys. Athletics for 
the girls is rather a difficult proposition because we have 
such limited gymnasium facilities, but we have made a start 
in this direction and one afternoon a week is given to the 
girls for basketball practice at the Town Hall. The Academy 
is publishing a school paper, "The Purple and White," for 
the first time this year and the first issue appeared in 
December. It is planned to publish this paper every other 
month and the cooperation of the townspeople in this ven- 
ture will be very much appreciated. Debates, school plays, 
prize speaking and chorus work all help to round out the 
outside activities of the school. 

I believe the Academy is very fortunate in possessing 
the teaching personnel that it has. The teachers have al- 
ways had in mind the good of Smith Academy and the 
town, and have devoted themselves whole-heartedly, not 
only to their teaching, but to such additional work as coach- 
ing of plays, prize speaking, supervising the publication of 
the school paper, etc. I wish to express to the teachers my 
appreciation of the earnest cooperation which they have 
given me at all times and it is by means of such spirit as 
this that the work of the Academy has, I believe, been put- 
on a firm foundation. 

I wish also to take this opportunity to thank the towns- 
people for the interest and cooperation they have shown in 
Academy affairs since I have been connected with the school. 
In particular the Academy is indebted to Mr. Henry Carl, 
Mr. Fred Howard, Mr. Harry Howard and Mr. C. E. Cowan 
for transportation which they have furnished the athletic 
teams and to Mr. Wm. H. Burke for umpiring at baseball 
games. 

HAROLD C. WILCOX. 






Report of Supervisor of Music 



The course of school music of today is not merely the 
singing of songs, but we must train the children to listen 
intelligently as well as to perform. 

The outline of the course which involves the technical 
and aesthetic phases of music, is practically the same as in 
former reports. 

All the buildings, with the exception of the Hill school 
and North Hatfield have a victrola. These are of great 
assistance in the course of music appreciation. 

National Song Week was observed during the week of 
February twenty-second, by singing the old and national 
songs. The children were very much interested in the stories 
and incidents pertaining to these. 

For the development of rhythm, we have formed a so- 
called "kindergarten orchestra*' in the second grade. This 
is composed of instruments of percussion, namely, triangulas, 
tambourines, sandpaper blocks, clappers and drums. It not 
only trains the children in ideal rhythmic work but the mem- 
ory is being trained, it is an excellent exercise in concentra- 
tion, and the enthusiasm shown by the children is very 
gratifying. We have been assisted in this by our grammar 
school orchestra consisting of three violins, two drums and 
piano. 

This year I have taken charge of the music in Smith 
Academy. A four-part chorus and girls glee club have been 
formed. One forty-five minute period a week is assigned 



76 

for chorus work and the glee club meets after school hours. 
We are planning to form a high school orchestra to take part 
in all school functions. 

The kindly spirit and co-operation of our teachers and 
officials make the work of the supervisor one of great 
pleasure. 

MAUD E. BOYLE. 



Report of School Physicians 



The work of medical inspection really involves much 
more than inspection of school children. We seek the en- 
forcement of the State Board of Health's requirement of 
vaccination of all school children. 

On the appearance of a case of infectious disease in a 
child of school age, measures are taken to prevent the infec- 
tion of other children, and every effort is made to find the 
source of the disease. This involves the expenditure of 
considerable time; and while we meet with better coopera- 
tion than formerly, we feel that if we had the assistance- of 
a competent school nurse to follow up and ascertain the rea- 
son for a child's absence from school, undoubtedly the source 
of many contagious diseases would be revealed before the 
invasion of schools. 

To illustrate : Diphtheria is one of the most treacherous 
of diseases that we have to contend with. This is due to its 
insidious onset, and the fact that very young children are 
more susceptible than older ones. A child under school age 
may be attacked, and before the diagnosis is made older chil- 
dren may be absent from school for a day or two with a 
mild sore throat, in no way resembling diphtheria, due 
nevertheless to the germs of diphtheria and capable of 
transmitting it to other children. These children in turn 
may not be very sick, but carry the disease home to a 
younger child whose chances of surviving are very small. 

If the school nurse visited the home of the first patient, 
found the infant sick, and notified the Board of Health, 
proper measures would be enforced to prevent the spread "f 
the disease. 



78 

The same statement would apply to scarlet fever — a 
disease prone to variations in its severity — also whooping 
cough and measles, in which the lateness of diagnosis by 
parents is responsible to great extent for the epidemic form 
of these diseases. 

"While much more could be said in favor of employing 
a school nurse, the practice has become so general that it 
hardly seems necessary to enter into any further arguments 
to justify her employment. 

We have been particularly fortunate this year to have 
no serious epidemics. "We would like at this time to recom- 
mend the use of toxin-antitoxin for prevention of diphtheria ; 
and would emphasize that children of pre-school age need 
this treatment even more than older children. 

A good rule to follow would be that every child up to 
fifteen years of age should be inoculated against diphtheria; 
and more especially those whose resistance is so weak that 
they contract all the diseases present in the locality. 

C. A. BYRNE, M. D. 

A. J. BONNEVILLE, M. D. 



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ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1922 



Metcalf Printing Company 
Northampton, Mass. 



Finance Committee 



Your Finance Committee recommend the 
Appropriations : 

Tenth payment and interest Center Schoolhouse 

loan, 
West Hatfield Schoolhouse loan (last note), 

Article 5 — Highways : 

Ordinary repairs highways and bridges, and 
patching, oiling and repairs stone roads, 

Article 6 — Necessary town expenses: 
Bonds — Town officers, 
Memorial Hall — care of, 
Tree Warden and gypsy moth work, 
Inspection of animals, 
Fire department, 
Insurance, 
Contingencies, 
Poor — care of, 
Interest, 

Salaries — Town officers, 
Schools — Maintenance, 

Article 7 — Memorial Day, 

Article 10 — Care of cemeteries, 

Article 11 — Public Library, 

Article 13 — School Physicians, 

Article 14 — Hampshire Trustees for County Aid 

Article 15 — Smith Industrial School, 

Article 18— Street Lights, 



following 



2.945 
5,000 



7,000 

100 

150 

500 

200 

'700 

300 

1,500 

1,500 

2,500 

2,300 

36,000 

120 

100 

850 

100 

150 

200 

4,339 



Article 20— Cement Walk (School Street), 1,000 

Article 23 — For finishing stone road (underpass) 

at depot, g 1,000 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
Wm. L. BELDEN, 

Finance Committee. 



$68,554 



Articles in the Warrant 

For Town Meeting, February 6, 1922 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To L. H. Kingsley, one of the Constables of the town of 
Hatfield, in said County, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town of Hatfield, qualified to vote in elections and town af- 
fairs, to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, 
the 5th day of February, next, at ten o 'clock in the forenoon, 
then and there to act on the following named articles, to wit : — 

Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2 — To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; one Assessor 
for three years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee for 
three years; one Water Commissioner for three years; one 
Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years; one Trustee 
Public Library for three years; Auditor; Tree Warden; 
Elector, under the Will of Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; 
Director of Hampshire Trustees for County Aid to Agricul- 
ture; six Constables; and to vote on the questions — "Yes" or 
"No" — Shall licenses be granted for the sale of certain non- 
intoxicating beverages in this town ? — and shall the Town of 
Hatfield petition for the installation of an Accounting System 
by the Commonwealth? 
All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 
and be kept open at least four hours, and for such longer 



time as the majority of the voters present shall direct, but 
in no case shall they be kept open after the hour of eight 
o'clock in the evening. 

Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various town 
officers and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5 — To take action in relation to maintenance 
and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year, and 
raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising money 
and appropriating same to defray the necessary expenses of 
the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8 — To take action in relation to support of the 
poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appropriate money 
for the same. 

Article 9 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 12 — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money in anticipation of the revenue of the current financial 
year. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the employment of one or more School 
Physicians, in accordance with the provisions of Chap. 502, 
Acts of 1906. 



Article 14 — To see if the town will appropriate $150 
for the support of the Hampshire Trustees for County Aid 
to Agriculture and elect a director of that organization who 
will be the official town representative for said Trustees as 
per Chap. 273 of the Acts of 1918. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield scholars 
attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 16 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for supplies and maintenance of the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for Tree Warden and Gypsy and Brown 
Tail Moth work. 

Article 18 — To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for Street Lights. 

Article 19 — To see if the town will vote (on account of 
mischievous pranks of some persons) to take up and remove 
the water tank opposite Howard's store. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will vote to extend its 
system of cement walks on any part of "around square," so- 
called, and raise and appropriate money for same. 

Article 21 — To see if the town care to vote — or discuss 
pro and con — the matter of giving a permit to the Consumers 
Service Stations, to locate 2-20,000 gals, gasoline tanks on 
B. & M. property, Dwight Street. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to rescind any 
vote previously passed, thereby giving control of the old 
schoolhouse and grounds on School street, to the Selectmen — 
and that control of said property be with the School Com- 
mittee. Or act anything in relation thereto. 



8 

Article 23 — To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriated sum of money in connection with the County 
and the K. R. Cos. for finishing the road near underpasses 

at West Hatfield. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : — 

In accordance with the requirements of the Statutes of 

Massachusetts, the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1922, is respectfully submitted: 

POOR EXPENDITURES 

Ahearn & Co., $ 74.00 

C. A. Byrne, medical attendance, 20.00 

Nicholas Raifa, supplies, 3.24 

M. J. Ryan, supplies, . 231.97 

City of Northampton, 836.22 

Poor aided, 3.52 



$ 1,168.95 



CEMENT WALK 

M. J. Walsh, $ 975.00 

Mrs. Frank Saffer, 25.00 



$ 1,000.00 



MEMORIAL DAY 

J. W. Heffernan, flags, $ 44.00 

Band, 69.60 

S. W. Kingsley, wreaths, 12.00 

Webster Box Company, truck, 10.00 

$ 135.60 



10 



OLD BILLS 

Fred T. Bar dwell, snow work, $ 16.00 

F. Zagrodnik, ordinary, 8.00 

North Hatfield Grain Co., cement, 4.80 

Northampton Iron Works, catch basin, 48.00 

F. J. Saffer, filing saw, 4.00 

L. H. Kingsley, rec. birds, marriages and deaths, 135.50 

B. Bernstein, repair highway, 4.25 

W. H. Riley, furnace door, 7.85 



$ 228.40 



TREE WARDEN 



James S. Bar dwell, 
Foster-Farrar, ladder, 
J. J. Breor, labor, 
IL Stoddard, labor, 
Chester Semkowski, labor, 
Peter Zagrodnik, labor, 
John Kobolinski, labor, 
Frank Johnson, labor, 
Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 



78.00 

17.50 

3.00 

5.00 

27.00 

17.50 

22.50 

21.00 

7.00 



$ 198.50 



STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Company, $ 4,339.00 

CONTINGENCIES 

Wm. Bifford, $ 3.40 

Wm. P. Boyle, paint, Town Hall, 12.75 

A. R. Breor, police, 40.00 

J. S. Bardwell, 146.00 

H. C. Wickles, sawing wood, 9.00 

O'Dea Bros., Dist. T. reports, 7.20 

Metcalf Printing Co., T. Reports, order books, 341.35 

W. & L. E. Gnrley, sealer's supplies, 11.89 



11 



Merrick Lumber Co., repairs, Town Hall, 

C. A. Byrne, births, medical assistance, 

W. L. Graves, repairs, Town Hall, 

P. R. Mullany, stamps, 

Shaw, Hickey & Cook, counsel, 

H. D. Smith, coal, 

J. J. Betsold, wood, 

J. A. Sullivan, Co., supplies, 

Amherst Gas Company, lights, 

A. J. Bonneville, births, 
David T. Shea, tuning piano, 

Davol Printing House, assessors' supplies, 

C. H. Chase, assessors' supplies, 

Auto List Publishing Co., 

Buffalo Roller Co., supplies, 

Northampton Commercial College, supplies, 

Dover Stamping Mfg. Co., supplies, 

Johnson's Book Store, supplies, 

H. S. Gere & Sons, advertising, 

George H. Newman, police, 

C. T. Bagnall, tax bills, 

Cave Auto Repair Shop, 

Hobbs & Warren, collector 's book, 

C. D. Ruse, badges, 

H. L. Pellam, mowing lawn, 

F. Brehm, care of clock, 

Lester Keyes, care of cemetery, 

Office Equipment Co., B. K, 

B. M. McGrath repair, Town Hall, 
J. J. Moriarty, furniture, 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



18.35 


39.25 


15.05 


24.82 


135.20 


37.88 


53.00 


5.50 


56.83 


11.75 


4.00 


4.25 


10.60 


5.00 


3.45 


9.65 


16.17 


2.06 


9.15 


5.00 


10.62 


28.00 


4.63 


5.51 


4.50 


25.00 


4.00 


5.00 


4.00 


11.50 



1,141.31 



Wm. Bifford, $ 9.00 

J. M. Hardy, supplies, 76.20 

G, Cruiekshank, labor, 11.50 



12 

Combination Ladder Co., 6.19 

No. Commercial Body Co., 5.00 

J. B. Bitner, repair Hose house, 75.29 

E. W. Boyle, painting 3 wagons, 153.00 

Robert J. Graves, fires , 30.50 

Alfred E. Breor, fires, 19.00 

H. L. Howard, fire ex., 30.00 

S. M. Bourdon, labor, 3.00 

P. F. O'Leary, signs, 2.00 

A. R. Breor, 426.80 

Herald Job Print, 27.50 

M. B. Graves, * 15.00 

James L. Day, 15.00 

John J. Betsold, 15.00 

H. W. Marsh, 15.00 

C. H. Crafts, 15.00 
Win. E. Boyle, 15.00 

'$964.98 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 

Harold C. Wilcox, as principal, $ 2,473.64 

Hannah G. Wilcox, as teacher, 391.25 

D. Webster Belcher, as teacher, 2,049.98 
Cora King Graves, as teacher, 1,060.25 
Mary E. Ryan, as teacher, 1,359.00 
Elsie V. Duburg, as teacher, 627.00 
L. H. Bailey, as teacher, 855.00 
Ellen E. Silkirk, as teacher, 494.00 
Clinton J. Richards, as superintendent 1,708.58 
Edward O. Shea, as teacher, 90.00 
Raymond G. Gettill, as teacher, 15.00 
Jos. T. Ryan, as teacher. 5.00 
Albert W. Smith, as teacher, 570.00 
Irvin D. Reade, as teacher, 774.00 
Marian C. Billings, as teacher, 204.50 
Mary B. Powers, as teacher, 1,140.00 



13 

Margaret A. Ryan, as teacher, 975.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, as teacher, 975.00 

Grace W. Bardwell, as teacher, 1,000.00 

Lena H. Proulx, as teacher, 985.00 

Margaret A. Mullany, as teacher, 632.10 

Mabel G. Chittim, as teacher, 90.25 

Harold D. Chittim as teacher, L028.03 

Elizabeth P. Wickles, as teacher, 921.50 

Alexandra J. Smith, as teacher, 958.50 

Rachel J. Palmer, as teacher, 948.50 

M. Elizabeth Boyle, as teacher, 950.00 

Frances H. Burt, as teacher, 456.00 

Frances M. Wood, as teacher, 896.50 

Rhena M. Horton, as teacher, 950.00 

Cecile E. LaFleur, as teacher, 837.00 

Catherine B. Brace, as teacher, 950.00 

Marion P. Breman, as teacher, 297.50 

Eleanor R. Whalen, as teacher, 342.00 

Nellie E. Salvas, as teacher, 950.00 

Maude E. Boyle, music, 750.00 

Bernice Bradley, 281.25 

Mary E. Yarrows, nurse, 300.00 

Dorothy Warner, as teacher, 28.00 

Elizabeth Holloran, as teacher, 22.48 

Margaret P. Ryan, as teacher, 10.00 

Maude Morton, as teacher, 2.50 

Mildred Boyle, as teacher, , 10.00 

Mrs. Geo. A. Deinlin, as teacher, 30.00 

Teacher's Retirement Board, 1,189.75 

Frank A. Brehm, as janitor, 1,653.21 

The Penn Publishing Co., 3.25 

American Seating Co., .64 

C. B. Dodge Co., 21.00 

American Educational Association, 11.90 

Gazette Printing Co., 10.25 

E. E. Babb & Co., 60.70 

American Book Co ; , 84.29 



14 

A. P. Schmidt Co., 9.68 

Schaar & Co., • 16.95 

Dentist & Surgeon Supply Co., 15.00 

A. N. Palmer Co., 33.12 

University Publishing Co., 8.23 

J. H. Quinn, 306.90 

Frank C. Johnson, 14.25 

Longmans Green & Co., 87.50 

John C. "Winston Co., 76.25 

F. I. Webster-Steam Hd. C(o, .65 

Emil Ascher, 8.32 

H. W. Wolfram Coal Co, 174.14 

L. E. Knott, apparatus, 17.90 

Educational Music Bureau, 9.00 

S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co, 12.20 

F. H. Bardwell, 30.00 

Edson S. Crafts, 14.00 

Standard Scientific Co, 201.99 

J. E. Lambie & Co., 9.68 

F. M. Crittenden Co, 32.00 

Peter L. Balise, 10.50 

The Baker & Taylor Co, 12.97 

Wright & Potter Printing Co, 22.25 

Independent Grain Co, 61.30 

Levitre Bros, . 39.75 

Texas Oil Co, oil, 8.84 

F. H. Howard, 112.09 

Oscar Belden & Sons, 50.00 

Webster Box Co, coal, 463.49 

Theodor Kundtz Co, supplies, 490.20 

D. C. Heath & Co, 22.48 

E. M. McGrath, repairs, 11.50 
M. J. Walsh, 34.65 
J. J. Bestold, labor, 68.25 
A. F. Foote, boiler, 4.00 
Merrick Lumber Co, 27.97 
library Bureau, 3.61 



15 

F. P. Jones, right of way, 50.00 

Bernice Cutter, census, 22.00 

A. R. Breor, truants, 101.00 

J. H. Day, lawn mowers, 2.00 

J. A. Sullivan & Co., 20.95 

Oliver Ditson Co., 16.38 

Fuller Brush Co., 1.00 

Northampton Commercial College, 5.50 

Benjamin H. Sanborn & Co., 1.51 

Webb Publishing Co., 1.78 

Broadhurst & Pomeroy, 1.75 

S. W. Kingsley, truants, 10.00 

Iroquois Publishing Co., 17.18 

Allyn & Bacon, 45.92 

C. C. Birchard & Co., 8.58 

Gaylord Bros., 5.85 

C. J. Eberlein, 26.55 

J. B. Lippincott Co., 194.41 

J. W. Heffernan, 76.52 

Ginn & Co., 231.54 

Chas. Scribners Sons, 47.03 

Scott Furman & Co., 9.45 

Houghton Mifflin Co, 104.46 

Morgan Envelope Co, 6.75 

Wm. R. Cutter, wood, 12.00 

C. N. Fitts, 46.00 

T. B. Cunningham, 125.00 

Amherst Gas Co, 130.10 

John C. Dettra & Co, flags, 11.13 

W. M. Welch, Mfg. Co, 29.70 

The Maxmillan Co, 66.52 

Milton Bradley Co, 18.45 

The A. N. Palmer Co, 21.46 

College Ex. Board, .75 

Modern Publishing Co, 1.50 

J. E. Lambie & Co, 5.55 

P. Blakiston Son & Co., 1.72 



16 

The Boston Music Co., , 2.80 

F. M. Ambrose & Co., 34.52 

McKinley Publishing Co., 21.62 

Benj. H. Sanborn & Co., 17.81 

Consolidated Dry Goods Co., 379.30 

Rand McNally Co., 166.41 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies, 685.97 

The Arlo Publishing Co., 82.05 

W. H. Riley & Co., 797.60 

J. B. Bitner, 90.94 

Foster-Farrar Co., 75.31 

O. E. Belden, 50.00 

E. N. Dickinson, 12.60 

B. & M. Railroad Co., 2.49 

H. D. Smith, 1,734.82 

A. J. Smith, 62.50 

Coburn & Graves, 98.84 

The D. L. Auld Co., 11.81 

Webb Publishing Co., 22.64 

Lyons & Carnahan, 1.36 

Beckley Candy Co., flags, 2.65 

Hill Smith & Co., 3.12 

Eastern States Brush Co., 6.15 

Kenney Bros & Walkins, supplies, 7.50 

E. J. Gare & Son, 2 clocks, 15.00 

W. L. Graves, repairs, 23.55 

Singer Mfg. Co., sewing machine, 46.80 

North Hatfield Grain Co., 2.40 

John Salvas, 262.00 

Mrs. John K. Holt, 255.00 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, 260.00 

George Dick Kingsley, 375.65 

Stephan Vachula, 121.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., 45.10 

Wm. P. Boyle, 330.62 

$ 43,541.57 



17 

INSPECTIONS 

Fred T. Bardwell, $ 151.20 

E. S. Warner, 234.00 



$ 385.20 



TOWN OFFICERS 

C. E. Warner, Auditor, $ 10.00 

C. I. Stowell, ballot clerk, 16.00 

Joseph E. Godin, ballot clerk, 16.00 

Robert J. McGrath, ballot clerk, 10.00 

Marion C. Billings, ballot clerk, 16.00 

Chas. W. Ryan, ballot clerk, 4.00 

Mary- R. McGlynn, ballot clerk, 11.00 

E. A. Breor, selectman, 150.00 

J. F. O'Dea, selectman, 75.00 

G. R. Billings, selectman, 75.00 

L. H. Kingsley, assessor, 329.00 

John R. McGrath, assessor, 270.75 

Dewey J. Ryan, assessor, 105.00 

E. L. Graves, collector, 300.00 

Joseph Goclowski, police, 16.00 

S. B. Bourdon, police, 12.00 

S. W. Kingsley, police, 10.00 

Peter L. Balise, salary, sealer, 108.07 

John McHugh, elector, 10.00 

Thos. W. Ryan, registrar, 13.00 

R. W. Weber, registrar, 13.00 

L. A. Billings, registrar, 13.00 

$ 1,582.82 

SMITH AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 

Tuition, $ 560.00 



18 

ORDINARY REPAIRS, PATCHING AND OILING 
STONE ROADS 

Michael Brennan, sand, $ 5.95 

E. W. Strong, gravel, 15.00 

E. N. Dickinson, gravel, 12.00 

S. W. Kingsley, sand, 6.00 

J. T. Fitzgibbons, sand, 19.30 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co., 451.92 

Frank S. Parsons, truck, 319.00 

B. & M. R. R., freight, 315.07 
Standard Oil Co., oil, 10.00 
Good Roads Machinery Co., 10.00 

C. A. Maynard Co., 18.00 
Hatfield Garage, gas and oil, 36.65 
The Barrett Co., Tarvia, 3,075.06 
John S. Lane & Son, 263.35 
J. A. Sullivan Co., 3.50 
C. B. Dickinson, plank, 133.70 

E. A. Breor, truck, storage, labor and exp., 37.40 
No. Hatfield Grain Co., coal, 39.58 
James S. Bardwell, 905.07 
Fred T. BardwelL 324.56 
Win. Bifford, repairs, 14.65 
Chas. Eberlein, printing signs, 10.50 
W. L. Graves, repairs, 245 
Peter Zagrodnik, labor, 63.00 
John L. Boyle, 241.50 
J. J. Breor, 52.50 
Jacob Geir, 141.50 
Henry Stoddard, 147.50 
Chester Senikofski, 110.25 
Henry Pellam, 90.25 
M. W. Boyle, 25.00 
George M. Franklin, 97.50 

F. GrVollinger. 48.00 
John J. Betsold, 30.50 
A. W. Morton, 21.00 



19 

Anthony W. Jandzinski, 46.25 

Michael Mageski, 111.25 

Alex Zamwill, 16.25 

John Vachula, 25.75 

Anthony Novak, 52.75 

Alex Little, 18.75 

Thos. Kostek, 7.50 

Joseph Mageski, 39.00 

B. Fralick, 35.00 

Andrew Klekut, 5.00 

Clifton Johnson, 3.00 

Lewis Murry, 59.50 

Lester Keyes, 40.00 

M. J. Walsh, 6.25 

John T. Powers, 7.00 







$ 7,570.46 


Cr. by outside labor and material, 


503.02 


POLICE- 


-EAIDS— CONSTABLES 




F. A. Brehm, 




$ 5.00 


A. E. Breor, 




232.00 


H. J. Sargeant, 




5.00 


L. J. Lavalle, 




5.00 


Fred Wentzel, 




5.00 


S. W. Kingsley, 




4.00 


Joseph Goclowski, 




28.00 



$ 284.00 

VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY 

F. H. Bardwell, treasurer, $ 100.00 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Albert Whitman & Co., $ 12.98 

Carrie C. Cutter, 46.90 

J. L. Hammett Co., books. 37.66 



20 

Margaret P. Ryan, 78.00 

The Sherwood Co., 301.58 

Hampshire Book Shop, 9.79 

Gaylord Bros., 8.80 

Amherst Gas Co., 25.62 

Ginn & Co., 6.91 

Rand McNalley & Co., 2.50 

Bridgman & Lyman, 42.67 

Ellen A. Waite, 225.00 

H. R. Huntting Co., , 16.54 

J. B. Bitner, 2 book cases, 16.00 

Hochschild Kohn & Co., • ' 12.75 

Library Bureau, 3.30 



$ 847.00 
MEMORIAL HALL 

E. W. Strong, wood, $ 20.00 

H. D. Smith, coal and wood, 72.75 

Francis Gogalinski, cleaning, 2.35 

Webster Box Co., coal, 19.08 





$ 


114.18 


SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 






C. A. Byrne, 


$ 


50.00 


A. J. Bonneville, 




50.00 



$ 100.00 
BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 

Boyle & McGlynn, water com. and town treasurer $ 52.00 

HAMPSHIRE TRUSTEES— AID TO AGRICULTURE 

W. King, treasurer, $ 150.00 

FOREST FIRES 

Fred T. Bardwell, $ 43.70 

J. J. Stenglein, 7.95 

$ 51.65 



21 

INSURANCE 
H. L. Howard, $ 270.36 

BRADSTREET STONE ROAD 

Standard Oil Company, oil, $ 15.74 

Hebert Bros. Coal Co., coal, 50.77 

M. C. Bailey & Co., 24.00 

Foster-Farrar Co., 18.10 

John L. Boyle, 370.31 

Fred T. Bardwell, 544.12 

J. S. Bardwell, 661.00 

Michael Mageski, 208.50 

H. L. Stoddard, 220.00 

Jacob Geis, 187.17 

Chester Semkofski, 100.17 

H. L. Pellam, 128.67 

Peter Zagrodniki, 154.50 

Joseph Mageski, 181.17 

Anthony Novak, 181.17 

Alex Zamwill, 31.25 

Anthony Szott, 181.17 

John Decomsey, 156.67 

George M. Franklin, 184.17 

Anthony Yandzinski, 17.50 

New England Metal Culvert Co., 93.50 

Frank Kruliski, 105.67 

Margaret D. Graves, 148.56 

John Vachula, 141.56 

E. N. Dickinson, gravel, 78.90 
Hatfield Garage, " 92.22 
Frank S. Parsons, truck, 474.00 
B. Fralick, 150.50 

F. P. Jones, 203.56 
James L. Day, 42.00 
A. W. Morton, 40.25 
Joseph Kozash, 85.56 
John T. Powers, 56.00 



22 



Northampton Water Works, 

Holyoke Street Railway Co., stone, 

Michael J. Brennan, sand, 

Charles Morrell, 

No. Hatfield Grain Co, 

Cave Auto Repair Shop, 

M. J. Walsh, 

The Barrett Co, Tarvia, 

C. E. Hodgkins, 

W. L. Graves, 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co, 

Howes Brick Co, 

W. H. Riley, 

Charles Eberlein, repairs, 



DEPOT ROAD 



Prank S. Parsons, truck, 
S. W. Kingsley, sand, 
James S. Bardwell, 
F. T. Bardwell, 
John L. Boyle, 
Wm. R. Cutter, 
Merrill C. Strong, 
Edson W. Strong, 
John T. Powers, 
Chas. Morrill, 
Jacob Geis, 
Geo. M. Franklin, 
Frank Johnson, 
Anthony Novak, 
Anthony Szott, 
Chester Semkowski, 
Winifred Kobolinski, 
Michael Magesky, 
Joseph Magesky, 



33.00 


2,547.56 


137.55 


10.00 


89.47 


6.25 


8.00 


1,760.00 


3.00 


6,48 


7.48 


4.50 


11.13 


1.50 


$ 9,954.35 


$ 158.00 


7.50 


214.00 


115.50 


91.00 


56.00 


35.00 


26.25 


77.00 


95.00 


51.00 


45.67 


33.00 


48.00 


30.00 


57.00 


60.00 


55.25 


45.00 



Frank Kruliski, 45.00 

Lewis Murry, 43.50 

Peter Dubiel, 21.00 

John Kobolinski, 39.00 

Joseph Sadoski, 27.00 

No. Hatfield Grain Co., coal, 45.50 

Mary A. Denlein, sand, 9.00 

Hatfield Garage, repairs, 14.18 



$1 ,578.35 

Unpaid orders, tarvia X and stone, 922.00 

PROSPECT STREET STONE ROAD 

Wm. H. Dickinson, $ 105.00 

B. Fralick, 35.50 

Joseph Kozash, 84.00 

G. M. Franklin, 70.50 

Michael Magesky, 94.50 

Clifton Johnson, 45.00 

Joseph Magesky, 76.50 

Hatfield Garage 16.10 

Holyoke Street Railway Co., stone, 304.74 

A. H. Beers, grades, 11.50 

J. S. Bardwell, 250.00 

F. T. Bardwell, 133.00 
John L. Boyle, 133.00 
John T. Powers, 115.50 

G. R. Billings, 42.00 
Charles Morrell, 105.00 
JohnF. O'Dea, 35.00 
D. P. Sheehan, 21.00 
Jacob Geis, 58.50 
Chester Semkowski, 58.50 
F. Johnson, 58.50 
James L. Boyle, 75.90 
Anthony Novak, 58.50 
Anthony Szott, 58.50 



24 



Stephen Karpenski, 
Winifred Kobolinski, 
Frank Kruliski, 
Joseph Bilda, 
Lewis Murry 
Roman Waskiewicz, 
John Kobolinski, 
Wm. Zdwill, 
Stan Rogaleski, 
Sebastian Blida, 
John Wesolowski, 
Frank Wesolowski, 
John Cernak, 
Peter Dubiel, 
Barney Nazio, 
No. Hatfield Grain Co. 
F. S. Parsons, truck, 
E. N. Dickinson, 



coal, 



24.00 

45.00 

34.50 

9.00 

57.00 

18.00 

37.50 

3.00 

12.00 

9.00 

9.00 

9.00 

3.00 

15.00 

9.00 

80.00 

158.00 

19.50 



Unpaid orders — tarvia X and stone, 



2,597.24 
1,403.00 



NORTH STREET STONE ROAD 



James S. Bardwell, 
Fred T. Bardwell, 
John L. Boyle, 
Jacob Geis, 
Geo. M. Franklin, 
John Decoursy, 
Anthony Novak, 
Chester Semkowski, 
Anthony Szott, 
Michael Majesky, 
Peter Zagrodnik, 
Frank Kruliski, 
Joseph Majesky, 
H. L. Pellam, 



380.00 
222.83 
107.33 
93.00 
73.50 
27.00 
88.50 
86.50 
96.00 
91.00 
55.50 
78.00 
67.50 
39.00 



25 

H. L. Stoddard, 37.50 

Frank Parsons, truck, 316.00 

Cave Auto Repair Shop, 3.00 

Howes Brick Co., 16.00 

Hatfield Garage, 49.92 

John T. Powers, 142.33 

Frank Johnson, 47.50 

Clifton Johnson, 29.50 

Lewis Murry, 39.00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, 177.13 

B. Fralick, 124.83 
J. F. O'Dea, 61.20 
L. H. Kingsley, 25.35 
W. H. Riley, 14.83 
Joseph Kozash, 35.00 
Peter Dubiel, 7.50 
Winifred Kobolinski, 36.00 
Wm. Zdwill, 15.00 
Stefan Karpenski, 27.00 
Fritz Backer, repairs, 3.75 
Holyoke Street Railway Co., stone, 1,200.90 
North Hatfield Grain Co., coal, 95.85 

C. A. Maynard, shovels, 9.75 
N. E. Metal Culvert Co., 104.00 
The Barrett Co., Tarvia, 827.48 
E. N. Dickinson, gravel, 30.00 
Charles Morrill, 77.50 



$ 5,059.48 



RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 

Poor— Care of $ 1,168.95 

Old Bills, 228.40 

Schools — Maintenance, 43,541.57 

Contingencies, 1,141.31 

Fire Department, 964.98 

Inspection, 385.20 



26 

Town Officers, 1,582.82 

Smith Industrial School, 560.00 

Ordinary Repairs and Patching, 7,570.46 

Public Library, 847.00 

Memorial Hall, 114.18 

School Physician, 100.00 

Insurance, 270.36 

Street Lights, 4,339.00 

Tree Warden, 198.50 

Bonds— T. O. 52.00 

Bradstreet Stone Road, 9,954.35 

Memorial Day, 135.60 

Forest Fires, 51.65 

Police, Constables and Raids, 284.00 

North Street Stone Road, 5,059.48 

Cement Walk, 1,000.00 

Hampshire Count Trustees, 150.00 

Prospect Street Stone Road, 2,597.24 

V. I. Society, 100.00 

Depot Stone Road, 1,578.35 



Total, $ 83,975.40 

Respectfully Submitted, 

EDWARD A. BREOR, 
G. RAYMOND BILLINGS, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



January 15, 1923. 

I have this day examined the books of the Selectmen and 
find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



27 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD— 1923. 



Bardwell, Fred T. 
Billings, Roswell G., 
Betsold, Frank L., 
Billings, George R., 
Breor, Edward A., 
Boyle, Michael W., 
Crafts, Caryll M., 
Carl, Henry W., 
Connelly, William P., 
Betsold, John J., 
Dickinson, William H., 
Dickinson, Edward N., 
Day, Edward J., 
Day, James L., 
Field, Samuel H., 
Graves, Murray B., 
Graves, Edwin L., 
Godin, William R., 
Howard, Harry L., 
Holley, Dennis E., 
McGrath, Robert J., 2nd. 
Proulx, M. Larkin, 
Ryan, Edward A., 
Ryan, Matthew J., 
Slattery, Charles F., 
Strong, Edson W., 
Smith, Herbert D., 
Smith, Adam J., 
Stowell, Charles I., 
Strong, Arthur H., 
Wight, Leland H., 
Weber, Rudolph W., 



Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Tax Collector 

Farmer 

Insurance 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Miller 

Farmer 

Watchman 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 

L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in Account with the Town of 

Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To Balance in Treasury, $ 2,567.98 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1919) 45.70 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1920) 4,080.87 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1921) 18,208.10 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1922) 47,837.24 

Treasurer Water Commissioners, 2,900.00 

District Court fines, 398.00 

Pool, slaughter, and garage licenses, 9.00 

Junk and fruit licenses, 38.00 

Sealer's receipts, 27.54 

Rent of Town Hall, 579.50 

H. L. Howard, refund of premium, 34.20 

H. L. Howard, labor on ditch and pipe, 16.38 

Fred G. Howard, labor on garage, 86.04 

F. H. Bardwell, No. 38 cemetery plot, .50 

Interest on deposits, 153.63 

H. C. Wickles, sewer entrance, 33.00 

Paul Zima, sewer entrance and tile, 70.10 

J. B. Bitmer, sewer entrance and tile, 55.94 

E. M. Graves, estate, entrance, 33.00 

J. S. Bardwell, sale of barrles, 6.00 

County Treasurer, Chap. 280, • 3,00 

V. E. Mitchell, labor, 10.50 

Alumni Association, labor, 8.00 

H. E. Graves, labor, 2.00 

D. F. Riley, credit on coal, 6.83 

J. L. Day, labor and material, 18.50 

28 



29 



Hatfield Water Works, labor and machine, 


346.60 


County Treasurer, dog refund, 


146.28 


P. T. Boyle, sale of stove, 


10.00 


Joseph Silo, 


141.00 


City of Northampton, tuition, 


330.00 


Town of Whately, labor on road, 


9.00 


State — School superintendency, 


805.56 


Income, Mass. School Fund, 


3,225.70 


High School, tuition, 


400.00 


Vocational education, 


24.25 


School Superintendency, 


926.02 


Department of education, 


97.75 


Income tax, general school fund, 


5,753.36 


Corporation tax, 


5,366.95 


Income tax, 


2,430.34 


Inspection of animals, 


117.00 


Subsidy, 


7.14 


Smith Agricultural Dept,, 


525.00 


Street Railway tax, 


13.83 


National bank tax, 


998.58 


State aid, 


48.00 


Highway commission, 


5,000.00 


Smith Academy, treasurer, 


1,375.00 


Town of Whately, seats, 


90.00 


Cash from temporary loans: 




Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 8 


40,000.00 


Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 9 


15,000.00 


Northampton Nat, Bank, Note No. 10 


9,000.00 


Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 12 


10,000.00 




$179,416.91 


Cr. 




By cash paid Selectmen's orders, 


$ 83,975.40 


Interest on water bonds, 


2,000.00 


District Court fees, 


187.67 


Director of Accounts, 


8.00 



30 

Interest on notes, 3,178.75 

County tax, 4,793.55 

State— State tax, 6,120.00 

Repairs, highways, 708.00 

Soldiers' exemptions, 3.00 

Civilian war poll tax, 2,142.00 

Treasurer sinking fund, 918.00 

Balance in treasury, 3,347.54 

By cash paid outstanding notes : 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 4 40,000.00 

Northampton Nat, Bank, Note No. 10 9,000.00 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 6 5,000.00 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 9 15,000.00 

9th note and interest, new school house, 3,035.00 



$179,416.91 

IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1918 Taxes) 

DR. 

To cash received, $ 000.00 

Orders of abatements, 505.94 $ 505.94 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, $ 385.94 

Addition to warrant, 120.00 $ 505.94 

(1919 Taxes) 

DR. 

To cash received, $ 45.70 

Orders of abatements, 560.31 $ 606.Q1 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, $ 492.31 

Interest collected, 11.70 

Addition to warrant, 102.00 $ 606.01 



31 



To cash received, 

Uncollected taxes, 



By uncollected taxes, 
Interest collected, 



To cash received, 

Uncollected taxes, 



By uncollected taxes, 
Interest collected, 



To cash received, 

Uncollected taxes, 



By Assessor's warrants 
Addition to warrant, 
Interest collected 



(1920 Taxes 
DR. 



Cr. 



4,080.87 
2,190.43 



6,271.30 





$ 5,941.81 




, 


329.49 


$ 6,271.30 


(1921 Taxes) 




DR. 


$ 18,208.10 






7,477.43 


$ 25,685.53 


Cr. 


$ 25,277.07 






408.46 


$ 25,685.53 


(1922 Taxes) 




DR. 


$ 47,837.24 






41,058.72 


$ 88,895.96 


Cr. 
it, 


$ 88,796.15 
48.32 






51.49 


$ 88,895.96 



I have examined the accounts of the Tax' Collector, and 
find that he has been credited by the Treasurer with the 
amounts of $45.70 of the taxes of 1919— $4,080.87 of the taxes 
of 1920— and $18,208.10 of the taxes of 1921— and $47,837.24 
of the taxes of 1922. 



CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 



January 15, 1922. 



32 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

To temporary Note No. 8, due May, 1923, $ 40,000.00 

Temporary Note No. 12, due July 1923, 10,000.00 

Unpaid Selectmen's orders, 3,218.88 



$ 53,218.88 



By uncollected taxes 1920) $ 2,190.43 

Uncollected taxes (1921) 7,477.43 

Uncollected taxes (1922) 41,058.72 

Smith Industrial School, 280.00 

Balance in Treasury, 3,347.54 



$ 54,354.12 
Balances in favor of the town, 1,135.24 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer. 



I have examined the books and accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Town of Hatfield, for the year ending December 31, 
1922, and find them correct. I find Selectmen's orders on file 
to the amount of eighty-three thousand, nine hundred seventy- 
five dollars and forty cents ($83,975.40), with evidence of 
their payment by him; also cancelled notes and receipts for 
County and State taxes, and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the treasury of three thousand, three 
hundred forty-seven dollars and fifty-four cents $3,347.54). 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 

January 15, 1923. 



33 
PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 





Income 


Expense 


Balance 


Fund 


1922 


1922 


1922 


Hannah W. Smith, 


$12.00 


$10.00 


$34.38 


Augusta Wells, 


15.16 


10.00 


338.72 


Oliver Warner, 


2.28 


2.28 


50.62 


J. H. Sanderson, 


4.66 


4.00 


103.60 


Luman M. Moore, 


9.83 


8.00 


218.30 


Abby Dickinson, 


4.23 


3.50 


94.61 


Lucy L. Morton, 


11.30 


4.00 


255.79 


Charles Smith, 


4.82 


4.00 


106.86 


Lemuel B. Field, 


4.77 


4.00 


106.36 


Rufus H. Cowles, 


4.84 


4.00 


107.70 


Charles E. Hubbard, 


5.02 


4.00 


111.75 


Alpheus Cowles, 


4.71 


4.00 


104.59 


James Porter, 


4.38 


4.00 


102.43 


Daniel W. Allis, 


7.13 


5.00 


159.34 


J. H. Howard, 


4.59 


4.00 


101.82 


Fannie M. Burke, 


4.40 


4.00 


103.28 


C. S. Shattuck, 


4.40 


4.00 


103.16 


S. W. Kingsley, 


4.38 


4.00 


102.38 


E. S. Warner, 


9.09 


7.00 


202.09 


Reuben Belden, 


4.29 


4.00 


100.29 


Theodore Porter, 


4.29 


4.00 


100.29 


Charles L. Graves, 


0.00 


0.00 


100.00 


Edward C. Billings, 


25.00 


5.00 


520.00 


Charlotte G. Wilkie, 


96.14 


0.00 


2,209,45 


Memorial Town Hall, 


111.20 


0.00 


3 111.20 



REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

We have the following amounts deposited to the credit of 
the Sinking Fund: 

Amherst Savings Bank, $ 1,274.89 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 1,969.78 

Easthampton Savings Bank, 1,924.32 



34 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,740.08 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 1,365.05 

Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,235.88 

Springfield Institution for Savings, 1,425.04 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 1,946.56 

Union Trust Co., Springfield, 3,117.59 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Holyoke, 1,847.87 

Northampton National Bank, Savings Dept,, 1,058.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. E. R. Co., bonds, 2,000.00 

Springfield Street Railway bonds, 1,000.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., bonds 3,000.00 

Boston & Maine R. R. coupons, 780.00 

U. S. Liberty Bonds, 2,000.00 

U. S. Victory Bonds, 1,000.00 
Hatfield Water Bonds, - 7,000.00 



$ 35,685.06 



M. J. RYAN, 
ERCENT E. GODIN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 



I have this day examined the vouchers and securities of 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 

January 10, 1923. 



Town Clerk's Report 

The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1922 are as follows : 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 

No. Male Female 

January, 9 4 5 

February, 3 12 

March, 13 5 8 

April, 6 3 3 

May, 7 2 5 

June, 5 3 2 

July, 3 12 

August, 8 2 6 

September, 10 5 5 

October, 5 3 2 

November, 9 6 3 

December, 5 3 2 

83 38 45 

BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 
Born in United States, 
Born in Poland, 
Born in Austro-Hungary, 
Born in Czecho-Slovakia, 
Born in Canada, 
Born in Germany, 
Born in Ireland, 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 
1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 

101 90 98 84 95 

35 



A 


25 


2 


49 


3 


3 


3 


3 





1 


1 


1 





1 



36 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

January 2 

February, 5 

March, 

April, 

May, 4 

June, 3 

July, 1 

August, 1 

September, 

October, 5 

November, 1 

December, 



22 

First marriage of both parties, 18 

Second of groom, first of bride, 3 

Second of groom, second of bride, 1 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 56 and 18 years of age, 
respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 54 and 17 years of age, 
respectively. 

BIRTHPLACES OF PERSONS MARRIED 



Born in United States, 
Born in Poland, 
Born in Austria, 
Born in Canada, 
Born in Hungary, 



22 22 

MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 
28 14 26 17 22 



Groom 


Bride 


12 


15 


9 


4 


1 


1 





1 





1 



37 
DEATHS BY MONTHS 







No. 


Males 


Females 


January, 




9 


4 


5 


February, 




4 


2 


2 


March, 




4 


4 





April, 




4 


3 


1 


May, 




4 


3 


1 


June, 




4 


2 


2 


July, 




1 





1 


August, 




5 


1 


4 


September, 













October, 




6 


3 


3 


November, 




1 





1 


December, 




2 





2 






44 


22 


22 






No. 


Males 


Females 


Under 1 year of ag( 


*} 


12 


7 


5 


Between 1 and 10 yea'rs, 


7 


3 


4 


Between 10 and 20 


years, 


4 


1 


• 3 


Between 20 and 30 


years, 


1 


1 





Between 30 and 40 


years 


3 


1 


2 


Between 40 and 50 


years, 


4 


2 


2 


Between 50 and 60 


years, 


2 





2 


Between 60 and 70 


years, 


1 


1 





Between 70 and 80 


years, 


4 


1 


3 


Between 80 and 90 


years, 


3 


3 





Between 90 and 100 years, 


1 


1 






42 



21 



21 



AGE OF OLDEST PEKSON DECEASED 

(Female) 92 years. 



38 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



Amelia Bajor 
David P. Billings 
Gena Pyeko 
Prank Sadowska 
Jacob Plaza 
Almira E. Moore 
Adella Kuluza 
Delvina M. Proulx 
Bridget M. Kiley 
Alex Yanzinski 
Joseph A. LeVitre 
Prank Jankowski 
Henry J. Woloss 
Alfred H. Graves 
Catherine Mataliz 
Joseph Pietrowski 
Daniel W. Wells 
Margaret A. Newman 
Leo Marcinowski 
Felix Adamczyk 
Anna H. B. Graves 



Mary E. Watson 
Jennie Jackson 
Susie Duda 
Prank J. Saffer 
Helen Bilieki 
Margaret R. Naylor 
Jennie Riziewicz 
Mary N. Karen 
Catherine Wanat 
JohnF. O'Dea 
Bernislaw Britzeski 
Paul LaMountain 
Annie Cunningham 
Anna C. Mullins 
Tessie Leboreski 
Alice Karwonska 
Mary A. B. Dickinson 
Clarence W. Daughtery 
Benjamin P. D wight 
Julia M. Hubbard 



DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending 

November 30, 1922, with the receipts and settlements of the 

accounts with the Treasurer, is as follows : 

99 male dogs at $2.00 each $ 198.00 

4 female dogs at $5.00 each, 20.00 



Less fees, 103 dogs at 20 cents each, 



$ 218.00 
20.60 



Paid County Treasurer, $ 197.40 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Town Clerk. 



Assessor's Report 

Value of assessed personal estate, $ 576,282.00 

Value of assessed real estate, 2,087,035.00 



Total value of assessed estate, 


$2,663,317.00 


Value of assessed buildings, 


$1,118,414.00 


Value of assessed land, 


968,621.00 




$2,087,035.00 


Number of polls assessed, 


714 


Residents assessed on property, 


465 


Non-residents assessed on property, 


75 


Number of persons assessed on property, 


540 


For poll tax only, 


351 


Rate of tax per $1,000, 


$32.00 


Number of horses assessed, 


375 


Number of cows, 


290 


Number of neat cattle, 


28 


Number of fowls, 


215 


Number of dwelling houses, 


442 


Acres of land, 


9195 


State tax, 


$ 6,120.00 


State highway tax, 


708.00 


County tax, 


4793.55 


Town tax, 


75,147.00 


Overlayings, 


2,027.60 



$ 88,796.15 
39 



40 

Addition to warrant $ 48.32 

Estimated bank and corporation tax, 1,000.00 

State income tax, 3,500.00 

Value of property exempt from taxation under 

Chap. 490, Acts of 1909 : 
Church property, $46,200.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 
DEWEY J. RYAN, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of H cut field. 



Water Commissioner's Report 

The following is respectfully submitted as the Twenty- 
Seventh Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows : — 

Balance on deposit from last year's account, $ 2,151.98 

One Victory Bond, 1,000.00 

One Liberty Bond, 1,000.00 

Deposit in Amherst Savings Bank, 1,537.50 

Deposit in Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,011.25 

Deposit in Northampton National Bank, 2,056.77 

Cash from Collection of water rents, 5,782.90 

Cash from two broken hydrants, 100.00 

Interest on Victory and Liberty Bonds, 90.00 

Interest on Deposit, First Nat. Bank, Northampton 91.36 

Interest on deposit, Amherst Savings Bank, 69.95 

Interest on deposit, Northampton National Bank, 80.93 

Interest on deposit, Northampton Inst, for Savings, 46.02 



$ 15,018.66 

We have paid the past year as follows: 

Town of Hatfield, $ 3,246.60 

Salaries of Water Commissioners, 100.00 

S. W. Kingsley, labor, 43.50 

Northampton Machine & Welding Co., 31.50 

W. H. Riley & Co., supplies, 77.07 

James R. Coffey, land, purchase, 314.95 

Charles Kuzontkowski, land, purchase, 162.33 
E. W. Strong, coll. of water rates, labor and cash paid, 488.73 
Harry L. Howard, labor and new pipe from street cock, 25.25 

H. S. Gere & Sons, printing advertisement, 1.05 

41 



42 

Norwood Engineering Co., supplies, 60.47 

W. L. Graves, labor and supplies, 19.39 

Vola Trading Corp., one transmotophone, 10.00 

E. E. Davis, survey and map of property, 15.25 

John W. Kiley, labor, 15.00 

Arthur R, Breor, labor, 10.00 



$ 4,621.09 



Balance in treasury: 

Cash on deposit, 1st Nat. Bank, Northampton, $ 3,595.15 

One Victory Bond. 1,000.00 

One Liberty Bond, 1,000.00 

Deposit, Amherst Savings Bank, 1,607.45 

Deposit, Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,057.27 

Deposit, Northampton National Bank, 2,137.70 



$ 15,018.66 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. KILEY, 
ROSWELL G. BILLINGS, 
L. A. DEINLEIN, 

Water Commissioners. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the Town of Hat- 
field and find them correct, with vouchers on file for all pay- 
ments, made, and a balance in the treasury of $10,397.57. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
January 18, 1923. 



Report of Library Trustees 



The report of the librarian covering the work of the li- 
brary for the past year is herewith submitted. 

MARGARET A. MULLANY, Term expires 1924 
MARIAN C. BILLINGS, Term expires 1923 
PETER L. BALISE, Term expires 1922 

Library Trustees. 



43 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library : 

It is satisfactory to note the larger place that the library 
seems to be making for itself in the community year by year. 
More books have been taken out by adults than in any previous 
year. The children's interest has been stimulated by the offer 
of a state certificate to any child who reads and reports on 
five books for his grade taken from the lists sent out by the 
Department of Education. 

Many pupils in the Center School are doing this read- 
ing and so a better class of books than usual is being called 
for. One of the great needs now is a children's room as the 
crowded condition on a Tuesday afternoon at about 3.40 
demonstrates. 

The circulation of books and magaiznes for the year has 
been 13,188 about equally divided between adults and juven- 
iles. 

124 books have been sent for circulation in Bradstreet, 
170 in West Hatfield and 122 in North Hatfield. As usual 
there has been a loan of 25 Polish books by the Department of 
Education, Boston. 

We have added to the library 451 books, 254 in the adult 
department and 197 in the juvenile. 6 of these books were 

gifts. 

We appreciate the faithful and efficient service of Miss 
Margaret Eyan, assistant. 

The library is open on Tuesdays from 3 to 5 P. M. and 
on Saturdays from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P. M. 

¥ 



45 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Balance from fines of 1921 

Fines 1922 

From sale of old paper 

Supplies 

Books 

Postage and express 

Balance on hand 



$ .15 




21.10 




1.60 




$ 


22.85 


$ 9.7v 




9.5S, 




3.45 




.11 




$ 


22.85 



ELLEN A. WAITE, Librarian 



BOOKS ENTERED DURING 1922 

Fiction 

Ames, Joseph B. Shoe-bar Stratton 

Author of Patricia Brent The Return of Alfred 

Bachiller, Irving In the Days of Poor Richard 

Bachiller, Irving A Man For the Ages 

Marrie, J. M. The Little Minister 

Bassett, Sara Ware The Taming of Zenas Henry 

Bassett, Sara Ware Granite and Clay 

Bartlet, Frederick Orin The Triflers 

Beach, Rex Flowing Gold 

Beach, Rex The Auction Block 

Beach, Rex The Ne'er-do-Well 

Bindloss, Harold The Man From the Wilds 

Bindloss, Harold Northwest 

Bottom, Phyllis The Kingfisher 

Bower, B. M. Casey Ryan 

Bower, B. M. The Flying U Ranch 

Bower, B. M. Chip of the Flying U 

Bower, B. M. Rim o' the World 

Bower, B. M. Trail of the White Mule 

Braley, Burton The Sheriff of Silver Bow 

Brownell, Agnes May The Thankful Spicers 



46 



Browne, Belmore 
Burnett, Frances Hodgson 
Burnett, Frances Hodgson 
Burroughs, Edgar Rice 
Burroughs, Edgar Rice 
Burroughs, Edgar Rice 
Burt, Kaiherine Mewlin 
Canfield, Dorothy 
Castle, Agnes and Egerton 
Carlyle, Anthony 
Cohen, 0. K. 
Comfort, Will Levington 
Connor, Ralph 
Cooper, Courtney R. 
Cooper, Henry St. John 
Cronin, Bernard 
Curwood, James Oliver 
Curwood, James Oliver 
Curwood, James Oliver 
Curwood, James Oliver 
Curwood, James Oliver 
Cutting, Mary Stewart 
Cutting, Mary Stewart 
Cutting, Mary Stewart 
Cutting, Mary Stewart 
Day, Holman 
Deland, Margaret 
Deland, Margaret 
Dell, Ethel M. 
Dillon, Mary 
Dumas, Alexandre 
Eggleson, Edward 
Eliot, George 
Evarts, Hal G. 
Farnot, Jeffery 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Fletcher, J. S. 



The Frozen Barrier 

Head of the House of Coombe 

Robin 

Tarzan of the Apes 

The Return of Tarzan 

The Beasts of Tarzan 

Q 

Rough-hewn 

Pamela Pounce 

The Fugitive Millionaire 

Midnight 

The Man's World 

To Him That Hath 

The Cross Cut 

James Bevenwood Bait 

Timber Wolves 

The Honor of the Big Snows 

The Danger Trail 

Steel of the Royal Mounted 

The Flower of the North 

The Country Beyond 

Little Stones of Courtship 

Little Stones of Marriel Life 

More Stones of Married Life 

Refractory Husbands 

Joan of Arc of the North Woods 

The Vehement Flame 

The Iron Woman 

Charles Rex 

The American 

Twenty Years After 

The Hoosier Schoolmaster 

Silas Marner 

The Settling of the Sage 

Peregrinis Progress 

The Borough Treasurer 

Scarhaven Keep 



47 



Footner, Hulbert 
Forman, Henry J. 
Fox, John Jr. 
Gerould, Katharine F. 
Gregory, Jackson 
Gregory, Jackson 
Gregory, Jackson 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grimshaw, Beatrice 
Hall, Holworthy 
Harker, L. Allen 
Harris, Corra 
Harrison, Henry Sidnor 
Hergesheimer, Joseph 
Hichens, Robert 
Hemon, Louis 
Hough, Emerson 
Hough, Emerson 
Hueston, Ethel 
Hutchinson, A. S. M. 
Hutchinson, A. S. M. 
Irwin, Will 
Johnston, William 
Jordan, Elizabeth 
Jenkins, Herbert 
Kaye-Smith, Sheila 
Kelland, Clarence B. 
Keyes, Francis Parkinson 
King, Basil 
King, Basil 
King, Basil 
Kyne, Peter B. 
Lewis, Sinclair 
Lindsey, William 
Lincoln, Joseph C. 
Locke, William J. 



The Woman Outside 

The Man Who Lived in a Shoe 

The Trail of the Lonesome Pine 

Lost Valley 

Under Handicap 

The Everlasting Whisper 

The Bells of San Juan 

To the Last Man 

The Day of the Beast 

Conn of the Coral Seas 

Rope 

The Bridge Across 

The Eyes of Love 

St. Teresa 

Gold and Iron 

December Love 

Marie Chapdelaine 

The Sage Brusher 

The Covered Wagon 

Eve to the Rescue 

This Freedom 

The Clean Heart 

Columbine Time 

The Tragedy at the Beach Club 

The Flue Circle 

Malcolm Sage Detective 

Joanna Godden 

Conflict 

The Career of David Noble 

The Dust Flower 

The Inner Shrine 

The Wild Olive 

Cappy Kicks Retires 

Babbitt 

The Backsliders 

Fair Harbor 

The Tale of Triona 



48 



Locke, William J. 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lucas, E. V. 
Lynde, Francis 
MacClung, Nellie L. 
McCutcheon, George Barr 
McCutcheon, George Barr 
MacGowan, Alice 
MacGrath, Harold 
MacGrath, Harold 
MacGrath, Harold 
Marshall, Archibald 
Marshall, Archibald 
Marshall, Archibald 
Marshall, Edison 
Marshall, Edison 
Maniates, Belle K. 
Merrel, Conrordia 
Merrel, Concordia 
Merwin, Samuel 
Milne, A. A. 
Minnigerode, Meade 
Mitchell, Ruth Comfort 
Monroe, Annie S. 
Nicholson, Meredith 
Nicholson, Meredith 
Norris,. Kathleen 
Norris. Kathleen 
Norton, Brayton 
Oember, Marie Conway 
Ogden, Harriet 
Oppenheim, E. Phillips 
Oppenheim, E. Phillips 
Orizy, Baroness 
Paine, Ralph D. 



The Wonderful Year 

The Enchanted Barn 

The Mystery of Mary 

The Red Signal 

Rose and. Rose 

Pirates Hope 

Purple Springs 

The Rose in the Ring 

Graustark 

The Million Dollar Suitcase 

The Ragged Edge 

The Million Dollar Mystery 

The Place of Honeymoons 

Peter Benney 

Big Peter 

Pippin 

The Skyline of Spruce 

Shepherds of the Wild 

Our Next Door Neighbor 

Love and Diana 

Julia Takes Her Chance 

Goldie Green 

The Red House Mystery 

Oh, Susanna 

Jane Journeys On 

Happy Valley 

Otherwise Phillis 

Black Sheep, Black Sheep 

Lucretia Lombard 

Certain People of Importance 

El Diablo 

Two Shall be Born 

Then Came Molly 

The Evil Shepherd 

The Great Prince Shaw 

The Laughing Cavalier 

First Down Kentucky 



49 



Pedler, Margaret 
Perochon, Ernest 
Porter, Gene Stratton 
Porter, Gene Stratton 
Quick, Herbert 
Quiller, Couch 
Raine, William McLeod 
Raine, William McLeod 
Raine, William McLeod 
Raine, William McLeod 
Reeve, Arthur B. 
Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie 
Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie 
Rhodes, Eugene M. 
Richmond, Grace 
Richmond, Grace 
Richmond, Grace 
Rideout, Henry Milner 
Rice, Alice Hegan 
Rmehart, Mary Roberts 
Rinehart, Mary Robert 
Richards, Laura E. 
Ruck, Berta 
Ruck, Bertha 
Sabatine, Rafael 
Sampson, Emma 
Sawyer, Ruth 
Sears, Clara E. 
Sedgwick, Anne Douglas 
Sinclair, May 
Singmaster, Elsie 
Sterrett, Frances R. 
Stowe, Harriet Beecher 
Street, Julian 
Stringer, Arthur 
Tarkington, Booth 
Tarkington, Booth 



The Moon Out of Reach 

Nene 

Michael 'Halloran 

Laddie 

Vandemark's Folly 

Foe Farrell 

The Fighting Edge 

The Big Town Round Up 

The Vision Splendid 

Maverick 

The Master Mystery 

A Castle to Let 

The King 's Widow 

Copper Streak Trail 

Strawberry Acres 

Foursquare 

The Second Violin 

The Winter Bell 

Turn About Tales 

The Breaking Point 

The After House 

In Blessed Cyrus 

The Wrong Mr. Right 

The Girls at His Billet 

Captain Blood 

Mammy's White Folks 

Leerie 

Romance of Fiddler's Green 

Adrienne Toner 

Mr. Waddington of Wyck 

Bennet Molin 

Three Young Rebels 

Cncle Tom's Cabin 

Rita Coventry 

The Prarie Child 

The Turmoil 

Gentle Julia 



50 



Taylor, Katherine H. 
Thayer, Lee 
Tracy, Louis 
Train, Arthur 
Vachell, Horace A. 
Van Vorst, Marie 
Van Vorst, Marie 
Walpole, Hugh 
Wells, Carolyn 
Webster, Jean 
Wells, H. G. 
Wemyss, Mary C. E. 
Weston, George 
Wharton, Edith 
White, Edward Lucas 
White, Stewart Edward 
White, Stewart Edward 
White, Stewart Edward 
Widdemer, Margaret 
Widdemer, Margaret 
Widdemer, Margaret 
Williamson, C. N. and A. M. 
Willsie, Honore 
Willsie, Honore 
Wilson, Harry Leon 
Wilson, Harry Leon 
Willson, Harry Leon 
Wister, Owen 
Wodehouse, P. G. 
Young, Elizabeth 



Yellow Soap 

QED 

Diana of the Moorland 

The Hermit of Turkey Hollow 

The Fourth Dimension 

Big Tremaine 

The Queen ot Karmania 

The Cathedral 

The Mystery Girl 

Jerry, Junior 

The Secret Places of the Heart 

Oranges and Lemons 

The Appletree Girl 

Glimpses of the Moon 

Anduvius Hedulio 

Simba 

On Tiptoe 

The Blazed Trail 

The Board Walk 

I've Married Marjorie 

A Minister of Grace 

The Lion 's Mouse 

Still Jim 

The Heart of the Desert. 

Ruggles of Red Gap 

Ma Pettingill 

Merton of the Movies 

The Virginian 

Three Men and a Maid 

Homestead Ranch 



Miscellaneous 



The Friendly Arctic 

The Cruise of the Kawa 

Western Hoboes 

14,000 Miles Through the Air 

The Edge of the Jungle 



Villyalmur Stefanson 

Walter E. Traprock 

Winifred H. Dixon 

Sir Ros Smith 

William Beebe 



51 

How the United States Became a Nation John Fiske 

Marooned in Moscow Marguerite E. Harrison 

Our Greatest Battle Frederick Palmer 

The Heart of the Anthracite Sir Ernest Shackleton 

Rivers and Their Mysteries A. Hyatt Verrill 

Tales of Lonely Trails Zane Grey 

Beatty, Jelluoi Sims and Rodman F. T. Hunter 

Dear old "K" K 101st Infantry presented 

Manchuria, Land of Opportunity presented 

An Artillery Officer oin Mexico presented 

Maj. Robt. Onderson and Ft. Sumter presented 

Forging the Sword, Story of Camp Devons 

William J. Robinson, presented 
Bomb Plotters in the United States Tunney, presented 

The New Industrial Unrest Ray Stannard Baker 

Pathfinders of the West A. C. Laut 

The Cornerstone of Philippine Independence 

Frances Burton Harrison 
Tramping With a Poet in the Rockies Stephen Graham 

Personal Experience of a Cub Reporter 

Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr. 
Memories of a Hostess, from the diary of Mr. James T. Field 
Life of George Westinghouse Henry G. Prent 

Mrs. Fiske, Her Views on the Stage Alex. Woolcott 

The Martyrdom of An Empress 

The Story Life of Napoleon Wayne Whipple 

Random Memories Ernest Wadsworth Longfellow 

My Memories of Eighty Years Chauncey M. Depew 

Conquests of Invention Mary R. Parkman 

William Atkinson, an autobiograph presented 

Artenius Ward 1727-1800 Charles Martyn, presented 

Under the Maples Stewart Edward White 

Boone of the Wilderness Daniel Henderson 

Heroes of Progress Eva March Tappan 

Labrador Days Wilfred T. Grenfell 

The Wi of the Wild Ernest Ingersoll 

Throttled, true detective stories 



52 



Letters of Travel 

From Pillar to Post 

My Unknown Chum 

Ben Hur 

Pilgrim's Progress 

Utopia 

Messer Marco Polo 

Poems 

The Lord of Misrule and Other 

Everyday Manners 

Winning Declamations and How 

Make Your Own Hats 

Trapping Wild Animals 

International Atlas 



Rudyard Kipling 
John Kendrick Bangs 

Lew Wallace 

John Bunyan 

Sir Thomas More 

Donn Byrne 

Algernon Charles Swinburne 

Poems Alfred Noyes 

Lucy L. W. Wilson 

to Speak Them 

Gene Allen Martin 

Charles Mayer 

Rand & McNally 



Juvenile Department 



Adams, Katharine 
Adams, Katharine 
Alcott, Louise M. 
Alcott, Louise M. 
Alcott, Louise M. 
Attshelie, Joseph A. 
Altshelie, Joseph A. 
Altshelie, Joseph A. 
Altshelie, Joseph A. 
Altshelie, Joseph A. 
Altshelie, Joseph A 
Altshelie, Joseph A. 
Altshelie, Joseph A. 
Altshelie, Joseph A. 
Ames, Joseph B. 
Ashmun, Margaret 
Barbour, Ralph Henry 
Barbour, Ralph Henry 
Blaisdell and Ball 
Bertelli Luigi 
Botsford, Capt. Charles 



Midsummer 

Mehitable 

Little Women 

Old Fashioned Girl 

Under the Lilacs 

The Sun of Quebec 

The Land of the Wild 

The Texas Star 

Apache Gold 

Horsemen of the Plains 

The Last of the Chiefs 

The Shadow of the North 

The Texas Triumph 

The Riflemen of the Ohio 

Torrance from Texas 

Including Mother 

For the Honor of the School 

The Adventure Club with the Fleet 

Log Cabin Days 

The Prince and His Auto 

A. At the Front 



53 



Botsford, Capt. Charles A. 

Young Heroes of Britain and Belgium 



Burks, Frances W 
Canfield, Flavia C. 
Cooper, James Fennimore 
Cooper, James Fennimore 
Curtis, Alice Turner 
Duganne, Phyllis 
Durell, Charles P. 
Eggleston, Edward 
Ellis, Edward S. 
Fitzpatrick, Percy K. 
Fryer, Jane Eayre 
Gates, Eleanor 
Gregor, Elmer Russell 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 

Grennell, George Bird 
Grennell, George Bird 
Hawksworth, Hallam 
Hartley, George Innis 



Barbara's Philippine Journey 

The Big Tent 

The Last of the Mohicans 

The Pioneers 

A Little Maid of Massachusetts Colony 

Ruthie 

The Skipper of the Cinthia B 

The Hoosier Schoolboy 

Life of Kit Carson 

j'ee-Wee Harris 

Our Home and Personal Duty 

The Rich Little Poor Boy 

The War Trail 

Last of the Plainsmen 

Buffalo Bill, Last of the Great Scouts 

Ken Ward in the Jungle 

Jack, the Young Ranchman 

Jack Among the Indians 

The Strange Adventures of a Pebble 



Boy Hunters in Demerara 
Hawthorne, Nathaniel A Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales 
Hendryx, James B. Connie Morgan in the Fur Country 
Henry, The Ransom o fRed Chief 

Holland, Rupert S. 

King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table 



Hueston, Ethel 
Hueston, Ethel 
Hunting, Gardner 
Jenks, Harriet S. 
Johnson, Constance 
Johnson, Owen 
Johnson, Annie Fellows 
Johnson,, Annie Fellows 
Johnston, Annie Fellows 



Prudence of the Parsonage 

Prudence Says So 

Their Friendly Enemy 

Song Echoes From Childland 

Mary in New Mexico 

Skippy Bedelle 

The Little Colonel Stories 

The Little Colonel's Hero 

The Little Colonel's Holiday 



54 



Johnston, Annie Fellows 

The Little Colonel's Knikht Comes Riding 
Judson ; Katharine B. Myths and Legends of the Miss Valley 

The Air Scout 

With Joffre on the Fighting Line 

Greek Heroes 



B. 



Kay, Ross 
Kay, Ross 
Kingsley, Charles 
Knipe, A. A. and E 
Lane, Martha A. L. 
Latham, Harold S. 
Long, William J. 
Long, William J. 
Major, Charles 
Manle, Mary K. 
Meigs, Cornelia 
Merick, George A. 
Rankin, Carroll W. 
Roberts, Charles G. D. 
Rolt, Wheeler Francis 
Rolt, Wheeler Francis 
Robinson, Mabel L. 
Roy, Lillian Elizabeth 
Roy, Lillian Elizabeth 
Schultz, James Willard 
Seawell, Molly Elliot 
Seton, Ernest Thompson 
Smith, Mary P .Wells 



Diantha's Quest 
The Arabian Nights 
Jimmy Quigg, Office Boy 
Secrets of the Woods 
A Little Brother to the Bear 
The Bears of Blue River 
The Bryne Girls 
The Kingdom of the Winding Road 
Home Life Around the World 
The Girls of Highland Hall 
Children of the Wild 
The Book of Cowboys 
In the Days Before Columbus 
Dr. Tarn O'Shanter 
Polly of the Pebbly Pit 
Polly in New York 
Lone Bull's Mistake 
The Imprisoned Midshipman 
The Biography of a Grizsley 
Boys and Girls of Seventy-Seven 
Smith, Mary P. Wells Young Puritans in King Phillips War 



Taggart, Marion Ames 
Taggart, Marion Ames 
Tarbell, Ida M. 
Tomlinson, Everett T. 
Tomlinson, Everett T. 
Tomlinson, Paul G. 
Tomlinson, Paul G. 
Turpin, Edna 
Wells, Carolyn 
Wells, Carol vn 



Captain Sylvia 

Who is Sylvia 

Boy Scouts' Life of Lincoln 

Carl Hall of Tait 

Jack Stone of Tait 

Bob Cook and the German Spy 

Bob Cook's Brother in the Trenches 

Happy Acres 

Dick and Dolly 

Dick's and Dolly's Adventures 



55 



Wells, Carolyn 
Wells, Carolyn 
Wells , Carolyn 
Wells, Carolyn 
Wells, Carolyn 
Wells, Carolyn 
Wilson, Bert 
Arnrud, Hans 
Abbott, Ethelyn 
Anderson, Robert G. 
Andreas, J. M. 
Bailey, Arthur Scott 
Bailey, Arthur Scott 
Bailey, Arthur Scott 
Baldwin, James 
Benson, Aljha B. 
Blaisdell, Mary Frances 
Blaisdell, Mary Frances 
Blaisdell, Mary Frances 
Blaisdell, Mary Frances 
Blaisdell, Mary Frances 



Blaisdell, Mary Frances 
Bigham, Madge A. 
Burgess, Thornton W. 
Burgess, Thornton W. 
Burgess, Thornton W. 
Burgess, Thornton W. 
Burgess, Thornton W. 
Burgess, Thornton W. 
Burgess. Thornton W. 
Chance, Lulu M. 
Cobb, Bertha and Ernest 
Cobb, Bertha and Ernest 
Collodi, C. 
Cory, David 
Defoe, Daniel 
Denton, Clara J. 



Two Little Women 

Two Little Women on a Holiday 

Two Little Women and Treasure House 

Marjorie 's May time 

Marjorie in Command 

Marjorie at Seacote 

Dad's Letters on a World Journey 

Lisbeth Longfrock 

Folk Tales From Grimm 

Seven O'clock Stories 

Rosy Cheeks and Strong Heart 

Tale of Timothy Turtle 

Tale of Nimble Deer 

Tale of Tommy Fox 

Fifty Famous Stories Retold 

The Pied Piper and Other Stories 

Boy Blue and His Friends 

Bunny Rabbit's Diary 

Cherry Tree Children 

Pretty Polly Flanders 

Polly and Dolly 

Rhyme and Story Reader 

Mother Goose Village 

Old Mother West Wind 

Mother West Wind's Children 

Mother West Wind 's Neighbors 

Mother West Wind 's Animal Friends 

Happy Jack 

Adventures of Bobby Coon 

Adventures of Unc Billy Possum 

Little Folks in Many Lands 

Clematis 

Arlo 

Pinocchio 

Little Jack Rabbitt 's Adventures 

Robinson Cruso ed by Louise Chappellc 

Real Out-door Stories 



56 



Dopp, Katharine E. 
Eggleston, Edward 
Pox, Frances M. 
Herford, Oliver 
Holbrook, Florence 
Holbrook, Florence 
Holton, Susan, 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Hope, Laura Lee 
Jones, May F. 
Lang, Andrew 
Lang, Andrew 
Lang, Andrew 
Lewis, Elizabeth 
MacDonald, George 
MacDonald, George 
Martin, Mary Isabel 
May Sophie 
Otis, James 
Page, Thomas Nelson 
Perkins. Lucy Fitch 
Perkins, Lucy Fitch 
■• B i wkiiwjf - L»e^~ Fitch 
Perkins, Lucy Fitch 
Porter, Bertha C. 
Porter, Bertha C. 
Pool, Maria L. 
Pratt, Mara L. 
Pratt, Mara L. 



The Early Cave Men 

Stories of Great Adventure 

Mary Anne's Little Indian 

The Herford 's Aesop 

Book of Nature Myths 

Hiawatha Primer 

Little Stories about Little Animals 

Bobbsey Twins at School 

Bobbsey Twins at Home 

Bobbsey Twins in a Houseboat 

Bobbsey Twins at Snow Lodge 

Bobbsey Twins in a Great City 

Bobbsey Twins in the Great West 

Bobbsey Twins at the Seashore 

Bobbsey Twins on Blueberry Island 

Bobbse yTwins at Cedar Camp 

Bobbsey Twins at the County Fair 

Keep Well Stories 

The Red Fairy Book 

My Own Fairy Book 

The Blue Fairy Book 

Wonderland Stories 

The Princess and the Goblin 

The Princess and Curdie 

The Little Princess 

Flaxy 's Frizzle 

Mary of Plymouth 

Tommy Trot's Visit to Santa Claus 

The Irish Twins 

The French Twins 

The Puritan Twins 

The Spartan Twins 

Trudy and Timothy and the Trees 

Trudy and Timothy Out-of-doors 

Boss and Other Dogs 

Stories of Colonial Children 

The Little Red Hen 



57 



Price, Lillian L. 
Pumphrey, Margaret 
Saunders, Marshall 
Schwatka, Frederick 
Serl, Emma 
Smith, Laura R. 
Smith, Laura R. 
Smith, Laura R. 
Smith, Laura R. 
Spyri, Johanna 
Sullivan, Alan 
Usher, Roland G. 
White, Eliza Oene 
"White, Eliza Oene 
Wright, Blanche 
Wilson, Gilbert L. 



Lads and Lassies of Other Days 

Pilgrim Stories 

beautiful Joe 

The Children of the Cold 

In Fableland 

The Circus Cottontail 

Bunny Cottontail, Jr. 

Bunny Boy and Grizzly Bear 

Jolly Polly 

Heidi 

Brother Eskimo 

Story of the Pilgrims 

A Little Girl of Long Ago 

Peggy in Her Blue Frock 

Bye-lo Series 

Myths of the Red Children 



Readers 

Elson, one two, three 

Easy Road, one ,two, three 

Edson-Laing, one ,two, three 

Edson-Laing, introductory 

Field Primer, First Reader 

Gordon, first, second, third, fourth 

Haliburton, first, second, third 

Heath, first, second, third 

Horace Mann, first, second 

Merrill, first, second, third 

Mother Goose Primer 

Mother Goose Fairy Tales 

Riverside, first, second, third 

Stepping Stones to Literature, first, second 

Wide-awake Readers, second, third 

Young and Field, first, second, third 



58 



Magazines and Periodicals 
Harper's Magazine 
American Magazine 
Scribners Magazine 
Good Housekeeping 
National Geographic 
Popular Mechanics 
World's Work 
Review of Reviews 
Popular Science Monthly 
Rural New Yorker, presented 
Red Cross Courier, presented 
National Republic, presented 
Child Life 
St. Nicholas 
Boys' Life 
The American Boy 
Our Dumb Animals presented 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1922 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Oscar E. Belden, Chairman, Term expires 1924 

Adam J. Smith, Secretary, Term expires 1925 

Patrick W. Mullins, Term expires 1923 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Clinton J. Richards 
38 North Elm Street, Northampton Telephone 1202-R. 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 
A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield schools) 
C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet, and West Hatfield 



schools) . 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Arthur R. Breor 



Between 5 and 7 
Between 7 and 14 
Between 14 and 16 



SCHOOL CENSUS 






April 1, 1922 






Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


79 


78 


157 


237 


213 


450 


49 


44 


93 


365 


335 


700 


61 







62 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy 



First Winter Term — 7 weeks 
Second Winter Term — 8 weeks 
Spring Term — 8 weeks 
Fall Term — 15 weeks 
First Winter Term 



Opens January 2, 1923 
Closes February 16, 1923 

Opens February 26, 1923 
Closes April 18, 1923 

Opens April 30, 1923 
Closes June 21, 1923 

Opens September 10, 1923 
Closes December 21, 1923 

Opens January 2, 1924 



No school on legal holidays and Good Friday. 

Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week and 
reopen the following Monday. 

When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following 
Monday is observed as a holiday. Legal holidays in Massa- 
chusetts include January First, February Twenty-second, 
April Nineteenth, May Thirtieth, July Fourth, the First Mon- 
day in September, October Twelfth, Thanksgiving Day, and 
Christmas Day. 



Report of School Committee 



Our schools have continued to improve during the past 
year; and Ave firmly believe that they were never better or- 
ganized, or working more smoothly and efficiently than at the 
present time. 

Extensive repairs and improvements have been made this 
year in the Smith Academy building, by the Trustees, who 
have also contributed liberally to the support of the school. A 
fine chemical laboratory has been fitted up and three com- 
fortable and convenient rooms have been provided for the use 
of the Agricultural and Household Arts departments. We 
have now a flourishing State approved Household Arts de- 
partment in the Academy taking the whole time of one teach- 
er and one half the time of another. The State will pay one- 
half of the entire expense of this department, but unfortu- 
nately the first reimbursement will not be available until 1924. 
bl- 
owing to the increase in the number of pupils in the 

Center School we were obliged to fit up a room in the base- 
ment, making nine rooms in operation there now. All school 
buildings in town are filled to capacity, and the time is near 
when we shall need more room. This condition can be partly 
relieved by using in some way the old school building on 
School Street; and we recommend that the town vote to re- 
turn this building to the school department. 

In September we lost from our board, by removal from 
town, the services of our chairman, the Rev. Thomas B. Cun- 
ningham, an efficient and tireless worker for the good of the 
school and town. We also regret to announce the resignation 
of our school nurse, Mrs. Edwin Moody, whose work has been 
very satisfactory. Her successor has not yet been chosen, 

63 



64 



A joint report for the Hadley-Hatfield School Union will 
he issued at the end of the present school year. This will give 
the report of the school year as a whole, while former reports 
have given only fractional parts. In addition to reports by 
the Superintendent of Schools and heads of the departments, 
it will contain a set of school rules and regulations to be 
adopted by the Joint Committee at their next annual meeting. 
A copy of this report will be given to each family in town. 

In conclusion we desire to express to our Superintendent 

In conclusion we desire to express to our Superintendent, 
our appreciation of their cooperation at all times and loyalty 
to their work. 

OSCAR E. BELDEN, 
ADAM J. SMITH, 
PATRICK W. MULLINS, 



Financial Statement 



For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1922 


RECEIPTS 




From State : 




General School Fund, $ 5,753.36 


Massachusetts School Fund, 


3,225.70 


Superintendent of Schools for 1921 


805.56 


Superintendent of Schools for 1922 


926.02 


Americanization account, 


97.75 


Agricultural Instructor (3 months) 


300.00 


High school grant, 


400.00 




4? 1 1 ^OS qq 




tp XX^OKJO.OiJ 


Smith- Hughes Fund, 


24.25 


Dog tax, 


146.28 


Stove and desks sold, 


100.00 


Joseph Pelc, Americanization work, 


141.00 


Northampton tuition, 


330.00 


Academy Trustees, 


1,375.00 


Town appropriation, 


30,000.00 




$ 43,624.92 



EXPENDITURES 

Salaries : 

School Committee, $ 235.00 

Superintendent of Schools and At- 
tendance Officer, 1,511.00 
Supervisors, 1,031.25 
Teachers— High School, 10,007.46 
Teachers— Elementary Schools, 18,395.28 
School Nurse, 315.00 

$ 31,494.99 

65 



66 

Books and supplies, 3,032.21 

Janitors and cleaning, 2,911.96 

Fuel, 2,489.50 

Repairs, 2,229.48 

Outlay, 670.20 

Miscellaneous, 713.33 

$ 43,541.67 

Unexpended, $ 83.25 





Smith 
Academy 

Hatfield 
Center 

Hill Primary 

West Grammar 
West Primary 
North Grammar 
North Primary 
Bradstreet Gram. 
Bradstreet Prim. 
Supr. of Music 
Supr. Draw. & Pen 
School Nurse 


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X 









Harold C. Wilcox 
D. Webster Belcher 
Mrs. Cora King Graves 
Mary E. Ryan 
Albert W. Smith 
Ellen E. Selkirk 
Frances H. Burt 
Irvin D. Reade 
Mrs. Mary B. Powers 
Margaret A. Ryan 
Sarah V. Kiley 
Mrs. Grace W. Bardwell 
Elizabeth P. Wickles 
Rachel J. Palmer 
Alexandra J. Smith 
Lena H. Proulx 
Mrs. Marion P. Brennan 
M. Elizabeth Boyle 
Eleanor R. Whalen 
Harold D. Chittim 
Mrs. Helen C. Deinlein 
Rhena M. Horton 
Cecile E. LaFleur 
Catherine B. Brace 
Nellie E. Salvas 
Maude E. Boyle • 
Bernice Bradley 
Mary E. Yarrows 


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Easthampton 
Walpole, N. H. 
East Longmeadow 
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Stockbridge 
Chadwicks, N. Y. 
Hatfield 

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West Hatfield 

Mansfield 

Northampton 

South Lee 

Bradstreet 

Hatfield 

Concord 

Northampton 


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ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1923 



Metcalf Printing Company 

Northampton, Mass. 

1924 



Finance Committee 



Your Finance Committee recommend the following 
Appropriations : — 

Eleventh payment and interest Center Schoolhouse, $2,900.00 
Article 5 — Highways : — 

Ordinary repairs highways and bridges, and 

patching and oiling and repairs stone 

roads, sewers and sidewalks, 12.000.00 

Article 6 — Necessary town expenses: 

Bonds— Town Officers, 100.00 

Memorial Hall— care of, 200.00 

Tree Warden and Gypsy Moth work, 500.00 

Inspection of animals, 250.00 

Fire Department, 1,000.00 

Insurance, 500.00 

Contingencies, 1,500.00 

Poor— care of, 2,000.00 

Interest, 3 ; 000.00 

Salaries— Town Officers, 2 ; 300.00 

Schools— Maintenance, 36,000.00 

Article 18— School Physicians, 100.00 

Article 10— Care of Cemeteries, 100.00 

Article 7— Memorial Day, 125.00 

Article 16— Public Library, 850.00 

Article 20— Smith Industrial School, 300.00 

Article 19 — Hampshire Trustees for County Aid, 150.00 

Article 26— Cement Walk, (Maple Street), 1,000.00 

Article 23— Street Lights, 4,339.00 



Article 24— Stone Roads— Chap. 90 ; Gen. Laws, 6,000.00 
Article 27 — Police protection, $1500 salary, 

$500 equipment, 2,000.00 



$77,214.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
WM. L. BELDEN, 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Warrant 

For the Town Meeting, February 4, 1924 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Hampshire, ss. 

To L. H. Kingsley, one of the Constables of the town of 
Hatfield, in said County, Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
town of Hatfield, qualified to vote in elections and town af- 
fairs, to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, 
the 4th day of February, next, at ten o 'clock in the forenoon, 
then and there to act on the following named articles, to wit : 

Article 1 — to choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2 — To choose all necessary town officers for 
the ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; one Asses- 
sor for three years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee 
for three years; one Water Commissioner for three years; one 
Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years; one Trustee 
Public Library for three years; Auditor; Tree Warden; 
Elector, — under the Will of Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; 
Director of Hampshire Trustees for County Aid to Agricul- 
ture; Six Constables; and to vote on the question — "Yes" or 
"No" — Shall licenses be granted for the sale of certain non- 
intoxicating beverages in this town ? ■ 
All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 
and be kept open at least four hours, and for such longer time 
as the majority of the voters present shall direct, but in no 
case shall they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock in 
the evening. 

Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various town of- 
ficers and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 



Article 5 — To take action in relation to maintenance 
and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year, and 
raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising money 
and appropriating same to defray the necessary expenses of 
the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8 — To take action in relation to support of the 
poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appropriate money 
for the same. 

Article 9 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will vote to accept and 
maintain the Sewer that empties into the pond South of 
residence of Wm. L. Belden. 

Article 12 — To see if the town will vote to improve its 
water system by replacing the old iy 2 -meh pipe with four 
inch — from Craft's corner North to the Whately line. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will vote to tile the 
gutter north side of road from M. J. Brennan's barn Westerly 
to top of hill, and raise and appropriate money for same. 

Article 14 — To see if the town will vote to repair the 
damage caused by broken tile at Gore 's brook on School Street 
and raise money for same. 

Article 15 — To see" if the town will petition the County 
Commissioners for a relocation of the boundaries and width 
of Elm Street, from west end of Kingsley's Bridge, west to 
the Northampton line. 

Article 16 — To see if the town will raise and appropria- 
ate money for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money in anticipation of the revenue of the current financial 
year. 

6 



Article 18 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the employment of one or more School 
Physicians, in accordance with the provisions of Chap. 502, 
Acts of 1906. 

Article 19 — To see if the town will appropriate $150 for 
the support of the Hampshire Trustees for County Aid to 
Agriculture and elect a director of that organization who will 
be the official town representative for said Trustees as per 
Chap. 273 of the Acts of 1918. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield scholars 
attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 21 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for supplies and maintenance of the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for Tree Warden, Gypsy, and Brown Tail 
Moth work. 

Article 23 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum of money for Street Lights. 

Article 24 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $6,000 — together with any sums allotted 
by the State and County, to be expended in constructing a 
stone road North of Pine Bridge, or act anything thereon. 
Under Chapter 90, General Laws. 

Article 25 — To see if the town will vote to accept cer- 
tain by-laws for regulating the construction and situation of 
buildings erected in the future. 

Article 26 — To see if the town will vote to extend its 
system of cement walks on any part of "around square" so- 
called, and raise and appropriate money for same. 

Article 27 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum of money for police protection for the ensu- 
ing year, or act anything thereon. 



Article 28 — To see if the town will raise and appropri- 
ate money for extending its Sewer system about 500 feet on 
east end of King Street. 

Article 29 — To see if the town will vote to add three 
additional lights to its Street Lighting System — two at 
Thompson lot and one at Slattery's, North Hatfield. 

Article 30 — To see if the town will vote to furnish water 
to the last house on Thompson Lot erected this summer. 



Selectmen's Report 

To the Citizens of Hatfield : — 

In accordance with the requirements of the Statutes of 
Massachusetts, the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1923, is respectfully submitted: 

UNPAID ORDERS— LAST YEAR 

The Barrett Company, $1,320.00 

Holyoke St. Ry. Co., 1,005.00 

L. H. Kingsley, 893.88 



$3,218.88 



TOWN OFFICERS 

C. E. Warner, auditor, $ 10.00 

Marion C. Billings, ballot clerk, 5.00 

John R, McG-rath, ballot clerk, 5.00 

Thos. J. Ryan, ballot clerk, 5.00 

Joseph E. Godin, ballot clerk, 5.00 

Mary R. McGlynn, ballot clerk, 5.00 

E. A. Breor, 1922 and 1923 salary, 300.00 

J. F. O'Dea est., salary, 75.00 

G. R. Billings, salary, • 75.00 

E. L. Graves, collector, 50.00 

John R. McGrath, assessor, 285.00 

L. H. Kingsley, assessor, 351.75 

Dewey J. Ryan, assessor, 135.00 

T. W. Ryan, registrar of voters, 10.00 

R. W. Webber, registrar of voters, 10.00 

L. H. Kingsley, registrar of voters, 10.00 

L. A. Billings, registrar of voters, 10.00 

Arthur Godin, sealer's salary, 150.00 

L. H. Kingsley, town clerk and treasurer, 800.00 

$2,297.50 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

C. A. Byrne, $100.00 

A. J. Bonneville, 100.00 





$200.00 


DIPHTHERIA CASES 




C. A. Byrne, 


$119.00 


POOR EXPENDITURES 




Shea & Fortsch, supplies, 


$108.60 


M J. Ryan, supplies, 


18.30 


Overland Garage, ambulance, 


10.00 


Cooley Dickinson Hospital, 


575.25 


C. A. Byrne, medical attendance, 


83.00 


J. S. Bar dwell, milk, 


48.50 


A. R. Breor, 


30.00 


T. F. Ahearn ; burial, 


60.00 


Fred O. Howard, supplies, 


99.94 


Kimball & Cary, coal, 


16.00 


Webster Box Co., coal, 


19.28 


City of Northampton, 


434.87 


Wm. H. Dickinson, rent, 


70.00 



$1,573.74 

VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY 

F. H. Bardwell, treasurer, $100.00 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 

Harold C. Wilcox, as principal, $2,478.26 

D. Webster Belcher, teacher, 2 ; 257.07 

Cory King Graves, teacher, 1,273.00 

Albert W. Smith, teacher, 855.00 

Ellen E. Selkirk, teacher, 1,269.18 

Francis H. Burt, teacher, 1,178.00 

Mary E. Ryan, teacher, 1.417.00 

Irvin D. Read, teacher, 1,161.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, teacher, 1,000.00 

Margaret A. Mullany, teacher, 140.00 

10 



Mary B. Powers, teacher, 1,200.00 

Sarah W. Kiley, teacher, 1,020.00 

Grace W. Bardwell, teacher, 1,000.00 

Lena H. Proulx, teacher, 625.00 

Elizabeth P. Wickles, teacher, 950.00 

Rachel J. Palmer, teacher, 930.00 

Alexandra I. Smith, teacher, 570.00 

Marion P. Brennan, teacher, 454.25 

M. Elizabeth Boyle, teacher, 945.00 

Eleanor R. Whalen, teacher, 890.62 

Harold D. Chittim, teacher, 759.00 

Helen H. Deinlein, teacher, 600.00 

Rhma M. Horton, teacher, 570.00 

Cecile E. LaFleur, teacher, 513.00 

Catherine B. Brace, teacher, 950.00 

Nellie E. Salvas, teacher, 570.00 

Mande E. Boyle, teacher, 750.00 

Mildred Boyle, teacher, 402.00 

Bernice Bradley, teacher, 693.00 

Mrs. Edwin Moody, teacher, 75.00 

Anna H. Deinlein, teacher, 10.00 

Margaret L. Ryan, teacher, 5.00 

Margaret P. Ryan, teacher, 5.00 

Predonna Leitch, teacher, 5.00 

Gladys Belden. teacher, 5.00 

Margaret Connelly, teacher, 20.00 

Gertrude Phillips, teacher, 825.00 

Marion C. Billings, teacher, 30.00 

Alice Ryan, teacher, 10.00 

Michael D'Amelio, teacher, 570.00 

Clarence J. Larkin, teacher, 684.00 

Jacquelin C. Farnsworth, teacher, 342.00 

Lena P. Fitzgerald, teacher, 400.00 

Harriet E. Jordan, teacher, 400.00 

Beatrice Rossmeisl, teacher, 342.00 

Ann V. Heffeman, teacher, 304.00 

Mary D. Donelson, teacher, 400.00 

11 



Nellie E. Honney, teacher, 380.00 

C. J. Richards, superintendent, 1,083.80 

Grin A. Morton, superintendent, 580.24 

Frank A. Brehm, janitor, 1,742.02 

George D. Kingsley, janitor, 352.00 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor, 265.00 

Mrs. John K. Holt, janitor, 263.50 

John Salvas, janitor, 267.75 

A. R. Breor, truants, 230.00 

E. L. Graves, truants, 75.00 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies, 578.35 

Little Brown & Co., supplies, 24.35 

Houghton Mifflin & Co., supplies, 12.79 

Ginn & Co., supplies, 172.11 

Rand McNally Co., supplies, 85.96 

Allyn & Bacon, supplies, 47.79 

Coburn & Graves, supplies, 4.20 

College En. Pub. Co., supplies, 4.70 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile, 66.58 

Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., 10.00 

Gilbert E. Morton, wood, 35.00 

E. E. Babb & Co, supplies, 117.89 

The Prussr Co, supplies, 18.85 

The Maemillan Co, 25.17 

Foster-Farrar Co, 45.30 

W. F. Brainard, 30.03 

Silver Burdette & Co, 49.24 

Consumer's Service Station, 2.25 

Regent Pub. Co., 6.50 

Howard & Brown, 32.48 

J. A. Sullivan & Co, 2.47 

Gscar Belden & Sons, 20.25 

C. B. Dodge Co, 53.50 

The John C. Winston Co, 109.12 

Wm. R. Cutter, 4.00 

Daniel G'Neill, 22.50 

Iroquois Pub. Co, 11.86 

12 



J. W. Heffernan, 38.80 

Shea & Fortsch, 5.49 

F. M. Ambrose & Co., 11.48 

John E. Fisher, 5.94 

Clarence Hawks, 5.85 

Consolidated Dry Goods Co., 39.00 

James H. Quinn, 21.60 

Newson & Co., 34.89 

P. Blackiston Son & Co., 16.35 

Carrie C. Cutter, 16.85 

North Hatfield Grain Co., 333.44 

Silver Burdett & Co., 12.20 

Boston Cooking School Mag. Co., 3.27 

Hans B. Julow, 3.10 

M. J. Ryan, 58.94 
Teachers' Retirement Board, *" 1,316.13 

H. D. Smith, coal, 2,056.01 

O. E. Belden, 60.00 

Wm. P. Boyle, labor & repairs, 691.93 

W. L. Graves, labor & repairs, 28.50 

Merrick Lumber Co., 74.11 

Amherst Gas Co., 229.13 

H. W. Wolfram, coal, 1,614.31 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co, 42.60 

Chas. Eberlein, 40.30 

Jacob Englehardt, 68.40 

F. G. Howard, supplies, 337.30 

Fred T. Bardwell, 22.00 

P. W. Mullins, 25.00 

W. N. Potter Sons Co. ; 187.16 

Webster Box Co, 263.86 

Kimball & Cary Co, 121.31 

F. O. Scott & Sons, wood, 48.00 

J. B. Kennedy, 143.97 

A. N. Palmer & Co, supplies, 5.61 

W. M. Welch Mfg. Co, 14.50 

Scott Forcum & Co, 7.56 

13 



A. F. Foote, 4.00 

Broadhurst & Pomeroy, 1.75 

Bernice N. Cutter, 22.00 

The Texas Co., 7.65 

Wright & Potter Ptg. Co., 2.05 

Guarantee Brush Co., 4.50 

J. B. Lippincott Co., 12.28 

Metealf Ptg. Co., 128.50 

Masterleaf Record Book Co., 4.55 

J. E. Lambie & Co., 3.98 

Milton Bradley Co., 18.48 

D. C. Heath & Co., 24.04 

Benj. H. Sanborn & Co., 11.60 

Hinds, Hayden & Eldridge, 44.29 

American Book Co., 26.95 

H. N. Giles, 6.00 

Gazette Printing Co., 33.50 

Laidlow Bros., 11.58 

Educational Music Bureau, 18.00 

University P. Co., 15.90 

C. H. Congdon, 10.10 

Current Events, 24.00 



$47,125.53 



ORDINARY REPAIRS, HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES, 
PATCHING AND OILING STONE ROADS. 

Fred T. Bardwell, $828.00 

J. S. Bardwell, 1,512.70 

F. S. Parsons, truck, 474.00 

Hatfield Garage, 225.38 

Merrick Lumber Co., 35.76 

Robert L. Belden, tractor, 35.00 

Chas. Eberlein, 21.31 

F. G. Howard, 53.39 

B. & M. Ry. Co., 90.24 

M. H. Dwight, 28.00 

14 



M. C. Strong, 28.00 

Benj. Bernstein, 6.50 

H. D. Smith, coal, 25.00 

Levitre Bros., 4.00 

John J. Breor, 501.00 

Lewis Murry, 490.50 

Jacob Geis, 281.21 

Anthony Novak, 290.00 

Chester Semkowski, 289.50 

W. N. Potter Sons, cement, 25.35 

Scott Harris, 60.00 

W. H. Riley & Co., 75.85 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R, Co., 32.22 

A. H. Breor, 2.00 
Foster-Farrar Co., 14.85 
John S. Lane & Sons, 120.19 
The Barrett Co., 1,038.19 
Good Roads Mach. Co., 185.50 
F. A. Shumway, plank, 326.00 
D. P. Sheehan, 25.00 
John MusciUo, 50.00 
C. H. Crafts, plank, 322.61 
Henry Morrell, 13.50 
Jos. F. Chandler, 24.00 
F. G. Vollinger, 7.00 
Registry of Motor Vehicles, 20.00 

B. Slozkoski, 4.00 
M. J. Ryan, 16.76 

$7,582.51 

Labor on driveways, bills due, $285.00 

OLD BILLS 

Wm. H. Dickinson, $43.00 

B. Fralick, 16.00 

L. H. Kingsley, 146.50 

15 



Holyoke St. Ry. Co., stone, 


1,075.72 


N. E. Road & Mchy. Co., 


426.50 




$1,707.72 


MEMORIAL DAY 




J. W. Heffernan, flags, 


$46.00 


Band, 


71.60 


S. W. Kingsley, 


12.00 


Webster Box Co., 


10.00 




$139.60 


CONTINGENCIES 




H. D. Smith, coal, 


$51.54 


H. L. Pellam, 


54.05 


P. E. Sanderson, 


30.00 


Metcalf Ptg. Co., 


268.75 


Amherst Gas Co., 


72.95 


H. S. Gere & Sons, 


48.80 


P. R. Mullany, postage, 


30.38 


E. A. Breor, 


49.00 


Corns. Public Safety, 


2.70 


J. J. Betsold, 


. 18.00 


F. G. Howard, 


22.00 


David J. Shea, 


7.00 


J. S. Bardwell, 


177.00 


W. & E. L. Gurley, 


15.46 


Mary Bukoski, 


8.00 


C. H. Chase, 


9.60 


J. W. Heffernan, 


6.40 


Herbert D. Perry, 


50.00 


Hobbs & Warren, 


11.63 


C. T. Bagnall, 


13.53 


Consolidated Dry Goods Co., 


57.24 


Johnson's Bookstore, 


2.81 


W. L. Graves, repairs, 


12.30 


H. N. Giles, 


2.25 


Daily Hampshire Gazette, adv., 


36.20 



16 



C. A. Byrne, 
E. W. Strong, 
L. H. Kingsley, 


10.00 
12.00 
67.00 


INSURANCE 
H. L. Howard, 


$1,146.59 

. $888.25 


MEMORIAL HALL 

Kimball & Cary, coal, 

North Hatfield Grain Co., coa ; l 

H. D. Smith, coal, 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 


$888.25 

$27.50 
54.76 
87.04 
75.00 



$244.30 

SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

To the Treasurer $287.51 



POLICE 



A. R. Breor, 

S. M. Bourdon, 
Wm. J. Shea, 
Alfred E. Breor. 
J. S. Bardwell, 
H. L. Pellam, 
Joseph Goclowski 
S. W. Kingsley, 
Jas. L. McGrath, 



$287.00 

14.00 

30.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

40.00 

12.00 

2.50 



$400.50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Smith Academy & Malinowski, Fires, 



$77.25 



17 



R. J. Graves, 

F. G. Howard, 

Hatfield Garage 

Orcutt Wagon Worke, 

U. S. Rubber Co., 

Wm. J. Shea, 

John Marlow, 

H. L. Pellam, 

M. H. Dwight, 

Peter C. Gallant, 

Alfred E. Breor, 

Arthur J. Breor, 

C. H. Crafts, 

A. H. Strong, 

M. C. Strong, 

A. R. Breor, 

John Raff a, 

R. Douryard, 

Allan K. Smith, 

Jotn Ondras, 

M B. Graves, 

J. L. Day, 

John J. Bet sold, 

H. W. Marsh, 

C. H. Crafts, 

Wm. E. Boyle, 

M. J. Ryan, 



18.00 

5.84 

10.00 

28.00 

375.00 

16.50 

50.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

4.00 

6.00 

7.50 

7.50 

150.00 

2.50 

2.50 

6.50 

2.50 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

2.64 



$892.23 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY TRUSTEES $150.00 
BONDS 



Boyle & MsGlynn, 



$40.00 



STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Company, 



$4338.96 



18 



INSPECTION 




E. S. Warner, 


$505.00 


F. T. Bardwell, 


134.80 




$639.80 


GYPSY MOTH & TREE WARDEN 


• 


J. S. Bardwell, 


$45.35 


John J. Breor, 


32.00 


Lewis Murry, 


32.00 


Fitzhewry-Gwptill Co., 


7.99 


David Billings, 


19.50 


M. Crawford, 


6.00 


F. T. Bardwell, 


8.00 


F. H. Benoit, 


50.00 




$200.84 


PUBLIC LIBRARY 




Margaret P. Ryan, 


$54.60 


Ellen A. Waite, 


243.30 


Womans Union, 


18.90 


Chas. W. Clark Co., 


8.80 


Gaylord Bros., 


21.20 


Library Bureau, 


13.90 


Dem. Ptg. Co., 


5.36 


Library Book House, 


12.03 


Standard Book Co., 


4.92 


Sherwoods 


235.85 


Amherst Gas Co., 


14.70 


Bridgeman & Lyman, 


42.45 


Hochschild Kohn & Co., 


9.60 


Hampshire Bookshop, 


15.10 


C. C. Cutter 


36.75 


V S. Keller, 


19.20 


Johnsons Bookstore 


8.02 


H. R. Huntting Co v 


24.00 



19 



Union Library Assn., 9.72 

Gazette Ptg. Co., 12.50 

Laura S. Belden, 6.00 

Geo. H. Danforth, 6.00 

Am. Book Co., 9.08 

Albert Whitman & Co., 9.38 

Ginn & Co., 10.85 



$852.21 

DRAINING & STONE ROAD WORK, UNDERPASS 
W HATFIELD 

W. C. Tannat, $725.29 

Antoni Novak, 78.00 

Stanley Jelis, 24.00 

Chester Semkowski, 242.00 

Jacob Geis, 217.00 

J. S. Bardwell, 556.00 

John J. Breor, 216.00 

Lewis Murry . 196.00 

Stanley Rogaleski, 68.00 

Henry Morrell, 421.88 

F. T. Bardwell, 368.00 

M. C. Strong, 236.00 

Alfred J. Breor, 135.00 

Waclaw Janucek, 42.00 

Shaw, Hickey & Cook, 120.00 

Cave Auto Rep. Shop, 5.40 

Joseph Ma-geski, 45.17 

Jacob Mageskr 64.00 

C. A. Maynard Co., 9.50 

John Wilks, 9.17 

Alex Kozash, 84.00 

Eddie Kozash 44.00 

Thos. Waskiewicz, 2.00 

John Kozash, 64.00 

Wm. Englehardt, 60.00 

20 



Alex Donnis, 


12.00 


E. S. Puffer, 


572.78 


E. W. Strong, 


23.75 


Hatfield Garage, 


147.00 


Joseph Blida 


28.00 


Shumway & Riley, 


638.65 


J. L. Day, 


4.00 


Sebastian Blida, 


8.78 




$5,467.37 


CEMENT WALK & DRAIN, 


SCHOOL STREET 


Peter Aloise, 


$1325.32 


John J. Breor, 


26.00 


Lewis Murry, 


26.00 



$1377.32 
RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 



Poor Expenditures, 


$1,573.74 


School Physicians 


200.00 


Unpaid Orders, Last Year, 


3,218.88 


Diphtheria Cases, 


119.00 


Town Officers ; 


2,297.50 


School Expenditures, 


47,125.53 


Village Improvement Society, 


100.00 


Ordinary Repairs, Highways, Bridges 




Patching & Oiling Stone Roads, 


7,582.51 


Old Bills, 


1,707.72 


Memorial Day, 


139.60 


Contingencies, 


1,146.59 


Insurance, 


888.25 


Memorial Hall, 


244.30 


Smith Industrial < School, 


287.51 


Police, 


400.50 


Fire Department, 


892.23 


Hampshire County Trustees, 


150.00 



21 



Bonds, 


40.00 


Street Lights, 


4,338.96 


Inspection, 


639.80 


Gypsy Moth & Tree Warden, 


200.84 


Public Library, 


852.21 


Draining & Stone Road Work, Undrepass 




West Hatfield, 


5,467.37 


Cement Walk & Drain, School Street; 


1,377.32 



$80,993 ,05 

Respectfully Submitted, 

EDWARD A. BREOR, 
G. RAYMOND BILLINGS, 
EDSON W. STRONG, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 
January 16, 1924. 

I have this day examined the books of the Selectmen and 
find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor, l 



22 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD FOR 1924 



Bardwell, Fred T. 
Billings, George R. 
Betsold, John J. 
Belden, Robert L. 
Crafts, Caryll M. 
Connelly, William L. 
Crawford, Malcolm 
Dickinson, William H. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Deinlein, John G. 
D wight, Myron H. 
Field, Samuel H. 
Graves, Edwin L. 
Godin, William R. 
Holley, Dennis E. 
Keller, Vernet H. 
Kent, Alvah B. 
McGrath, Robert J. 2d 
Proulx, M. Larkin 
Pelc, Joseph J. 
Ryan, Edward A. 
Ryan, Matthew J. 
Slattery, Charles F. 
Strong, Edson W. 
Smith, Herbert D. 
Smith, Adam J. 
Stowell, Charles I. 
Strong, Arthur H. 
Strong, Merrill C. 
Strong, Eugene S. 
Wight, Leland H. 
Weber, Rudolph W. 



Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Photographer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Mechanic 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Collector 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Supt. 

Chauffeur 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Miller 

Farmer 

Watchman 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 



23 



Treasurer's Report 

L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in account with the Town of 

Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To balance in treasury, $3,347.54 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, collector, (1920) 2,367.64 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, collector, (1921) 6,477.82 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, collector, (1922) 34,677.40 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, collector, (1923) 2,695.00 

Cash received from L. H. Kingsley, collector, (1923) 46,054.05 

Treasurer Water Commissioners, 2,900.00 

District Court fines, 504.60 

Pool, slaughter, junk and fruit licenses, 40.00 

Sealer's receipts, 41.06 

Rent of Town Hall, 354.50 

H. L. Howard, insurance loss, Town Hall, 10.00 

W. H. Hadley, load gravel, 2.00 

Samuel Osley, sale of cemetery plot, .50 

Digging graves, J. Coburn, 10.00 

Pat Gleason, damage to Riverside Bridge, 50.00 

J. S. Bardwell, 3 burials, 25.00 

P. W. Mullins, sale of plank, 6.00 

John Merrick, labor, 4.50 

Hatfield Water Works, labor,. 17.25 

Mass. Agl. College, sale of pipe, 4.80 

County Treasurer, refunding dog fund, 152.48 

Interest on deposits, 188.49 

City of Northampton, tuition, 302.00 

State — Vocational Education, 1,555.87 

Corporation Tax, 1,244.20 

Income Tax, 3,382.78 

Civilian War Poll Tax, 75.00 

Smith-Hughes Fund, 92.26 

Dept. of Education, 162.83 

City of Boston, 34.72 

24 



Schools, Supt. small towns, 918.76 

Income Tax, general school fund, 6,136.25 

National Bank Tax, 494.53 

Irvin D. Reade ; sale of sup., 3.13 

C. J. Richards, sale of sup., 4.45 

C. B. Dolge Co., refund of ct, 21.00 

Longman, Grun & Co. ; refund of ct., 9.44 

Harry Astmann, sale of seats, 100.00 

Smith Academy, tuition, 600.00 

Hampshire County Treasurer, Depot underpass, 1,750.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., depot underpass, 1,000.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., depot underpass, 1,750.00 
Cash from temporary loans : 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 13 40 000.00 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 14 15,000.00 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 15 20,000.00 

$194,567.85 

Cr. 

By cash paid Selectmen's orders, $80,993.05 

Interest on water bonds, 2,000.00 

District Court fees, 178.29 

Director of Accounts, 6.00 

Interest on notes, 3,181.25 

County Tax, 5,545.18 

State— State Tax, 6,120.00 

Repairs, highways, 543.51 

Soldiers' exemption, 11.02 

Civilian war poll tax, 1,959.00 

Treasurer Sinking Fund, 918.00 

Balance in Treasury, 5,117.55 

By cash paid outstanding notes : 

Northampton Nat, Bank. Note No. 8 40,000.00 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 12 10,000.00 

Northampton Nat Bank, Note No. 14 15,000.00 

Northampton Nat Bank, Note No. 7 5,000.00 

25 



Northampton Nat. Bank, Note No. 15 15,000.00 

10th note and interest, new schoolhouse, 2,995.00 



$194,567.85 



IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1920 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $2,367.64 

Abatements, 262.35 

$2,630.99 



Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, $2,190.43 

Interest collected, 331.66 

Addition to warrant. 108.90 



$2,630.99 



(1921 Taxes) 
Dr. 

To cash received, $6,477.82 

Uncollected taxes, 1,597.46 



,075.28 



Cr. 
By uncollected taxes, $7^477.43 

Interect collected, 597.85 ' 

" $8,075.28 

(1922 Taxes) 
Dr. 
To cash received, $34,677.40 

Uncollected, 7,663.17 

$42,340.57 

Cr. 
By uncollected taxes, $41,058.72 

Interest collected.. 1,281.85 

— $42,340.57 

26 



(1923 Poll Taxes) 
Dr. 
To cash received, . $2,695.00 

Uncollected, 565.00 

$3,260.00 

Cr. 
By Assessors' warrant, $3,260.00 

IN ACCOUNT WITH L. H. KINGSLEY, COLLECTOR 

(1923 Real & Personal Tax) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $46,054.05 

Uncollected taxes, 32,413.74 

■ $78,467.79 



Cr. 

By Assessors' warrant, $78,404.26 

Interest collected, 63.53 



$78,467.79 



I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collectors, 
and find that they have been credited by the Treasurer with 
the amounts of $2,367.64 of the taxes of 1920 ; $6,477.82 of 
the year 1921; $34,677.40 of the year 1922; $2,695.00 of the 
poll tax, year 1923, and $46,054.05 of the taxes of 1923. 
January 16, 1924. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 
Auditor. 



SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

To Temporary Note No. 13 ; due May '24, $40,000.00 

Temporary Note No. 15, bal due of 5,000.00 

Bills due on depot underpass, 2,800.00 

$47,800.00 

27 



Uncollected taxes (1921), 




$1,597.46 


Uncollected taxes (1922), 




7,663.17 


Uncollected taxes (1923), 


polls, 


565.00 


Uncollected taxes (1923), 




32,297.80 


Aloisi Bond, 




1,000.00 


Bills due town. 




321.50 


Balance in treasury, 




5,117.55 




$48,562.48 


Balance in favor of the tc 


>wn, 


762.48 



Kespectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 
Treasurer. 



I have examined the books and accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Town of Hatfield, for the year ending December 31, 
1923, and find them correct. I find Selectmen's orders on file 
to the amount of Eighty thousand, nine hundred ninety-three 
dollars and five cents ($80,993.05), with evidence of their 
payment by him ; also cancelled notes and receipts for County 
and State taxes, and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the treasury of Five thousand, one 
hundred seventeen dollars and fifty-five cents, $5,117.55). 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 
January 1, 1924. 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 

Income Expense Balance 



Fund, 


1923 


1923 


1923 


Hannah W. Smith. 


$12.00 


$10.00 


$36.38 


Augusta Wells, 


15.40 


10.00 


344.12 


Oliver Warner, 


2.28 


2.00 


50.90 


John H. Sanderson, 


4.68 


4.00 


104.28 


Luinan M. Moore, 


9.93 


8.00 


220.23 



28 



Abby Dickinson, 


4.28 


3.50 


95.39 


Lucy L. Morton, 


11.61 


4.00 


263.40 


Charles Smith, 


4.84 


4.00 


107.70 


Lemuel B. Field, 


4.82 


4.00 


107.20 


Charlotte G. Wilkie ; 


100.53 


0.00 


2,309.98 


Rufus H. Cowles, 


4.89 


4.00 


108.59 


Charles E. Hubbard, 


5.07 


4.00 


112.82 


Alpheus Cowles, 


4.73 


4.00 


105.32 


James Porter, 


4.35 


4.00 


102.78 


Daniel W. Allis, 


7.23 


5.00 


161.57 


J. H. Howard, 


4.61 


4.00 


102.43 


Fannie M. Burke, 


4.42 


4.00 


103.70 


Charles S. Shattuck, 


4.42 


4.00 


103.58 


Seth W. Kingsley, 


4.38 


4.00 


102.76 


E. S. Warner, 


9.17 


7.00 


204.26 


Reuben Belden, 


4.29 


4.00 


100.58 


Theodore Porter, 


4.29 


4.00 


100.58 


Charles L. Graves, 


4.62 


4.00 


100.62 


Roswell Hubbard, 


1.88 


1.88 


100.00 


Cooley D. Dickinson, 


1.88 


1.88 


125.00 


Elizah Bardwell, 


0.00 


0.00 


300.00 


Joseph D. Billings, 


0.00 


0.00 


100.00 


Memorial Town Hall, 


0.00 


0.00 


3.111.20 


Edward C. Billings, 


25.00 


5.00 


540.00 



REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

We have the following amounts deposited to the credit 
of the Sinking Fund : 

Amherst Savings Bank, $1,332.86 

Easthampton Savings Bank, 1,965.45 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 1,527.15 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 2,010.78 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,858.74 

Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,288.93 

29 



Springfield Institution for Savings, 1 993.16 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 2,034.15 

Union Trust Co., Springfield, 3,257.88 

Mechanic Savings Bank, Holyoke, 1,930.00 
Northampton National Bank, Savings Department, 1,090.05 
First National Bank, Northampton, Savings Dept., 1 058.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. E. R. Co., bonds, 2,000.00 

Boston & Maine R. R. Co., bonds, 3,000.00 

Boston & Maine R. R. Co., coupons, 900.00 

Springfield Street Railway Co., bonds, 1,000.00 

U. S. Liberty bonds, 2,000.00 

U. S. Victory bonds, 1,000.00 

Hatfield Water bonds, 7,000.00 



$38,247.15 



M. J. RYAN, 
ERCENT E. GODIN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 



I have this day examined the vouchers and securities of 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 
Auditor. 
January 10, 1924. 



30 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1923 are as follows : — 



BIRTHS BY MONTHS 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



No. 


Male 


Female 


7 


3 


4 


4 


4 





6 


3 


3 


8 


6 


2 


10 


4 


6 


8 


5 


3 


4 


3 


1 


4 


3 


1 


12 


6 


6 


4 


1 


3 


6 


5 


1 


4 


1 


3 



77 44 33 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 

Born in United States, 13 17 

Born in Poland, 49 45 

Born in Austria- Hungary, 2 2 

Born in Czecho-Slovakia, 11 12 

Born in Canada, 1 

Born in Ireland, 1 

Born in Italy, 1 

77 77 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 

90 98 84 95 83 



31 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

January, 1 

February, 1 

March, 

April, 3 

May, 

June, 4 

July, 1 

August, 4 

September, 4 

October, 1 

November, 3 

December, 

22 

First marriage of both parties, 21 

Second of groom, first of bride, 1 

Second of groom, second of bride, 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 47 and 22 years of age 
respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 42 and 17 years of age 
respectively. 

BIRTHPLACES OF PERSONS MARRIED 



Born in United States, 
Born in Poland, 
Born in Germany, 



22 22 

MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



Groom 


Bride 


15 


16 


6 


5 


1 


1 



1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


14 


26 


17 


22 


22 



32 



d: 


EATHS 


> BY MONTHS 




« 






No. 


Male 


Female 


January, 




3 


3 





February, 




4 


1 


3 


March, 




3 


1 


2 


April, 




7 


5 


2 


May, 




3 


1 


2 


June, 




2 





2 


July, 




1 


1 





August, 




4 


3 


1 


September, 




5 


2 


3 


October, 




2 


1 


1 


November, 




1 





1 


December, 




1 


1 









36 


19 


17 






No. 


Male 


Female 


Under 1 year of age, 


12 


7 


5 


Between 1 and 10 


years. 


2 


1 


1 


Between 10 and 20 


years, 











Between 20 and 30 


years ; 


1 





1 


Between 30 and 40 


years, 


2 


1 


1 


Between 40 and 50 


years, 


1 


1 





Between 50 and 60 


years, 


4 


2 


2 


Between 60 and 70 


years, 


5 


2 


3 


Between 70 and 80 


years, 


6 


2 


4 


Between 80 and 90 


years, 


3 


1 


2 



36 17 

Age of oldest person deceased, (male) 89 years. 

NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



19 



Andre Kosteb 
Czeslaw Michalowski 
Joseph Zywna 
Catherine Zywna 
Samuel J. Petcen 



Hattie W. Lamb 
John Nartowicz 
Mary E. Sweatland 
Dennis W. Fitzgibbons 
Katherine B. Mullins 



33 



Bolislaw Rogalowski 
Joseph Kosior 
Stella Kuchyt 
William F. Bardwell 
Mary V. Selwa 
Wanda Kulisza 
Robert G. Gallant 
Mary W. Sheehan 
Antonina Selwa 
John Darius 
Wladyslawa Backiel 
Martin Dembrowski 
Carrie M. Robbins 



Joseph S. Newman 
Mary A. B. Saffer 
Mary M. Vollinger 
Felix Marcoux 
Augusta W. Beals 
Jacob Carl 
Charles Casten 
Mary E. Baggs 
Julia E. Hubbard 
George W. Hubbard 
Melissa Cooley 
Jared Wheeler 
Jonathan Coburn 



DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending 

November 30, 1923, with the receipts and settlements of the 

accounts with the Treasurer, is as follows: — 

73 male dogs at $2.00 each, $146.00 

3 female dogs at $5.00 each, 15.00 



Less fees, 76 dogs at 20 cents each, 

Paid County Treasurer, 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 
Town Clerk. 



$161.00 
15.20 

$145.80 



34 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed personal estate, 


$418,934.00 


Value of assessed real estate, 


2,105.241.00 


Total value of assessed estate, 


$2,524,175.00 


Value of assessed buildings, 


$1,136,289.00 


Value of assessed land, 


968,952.00 




$2,105,241.00 


Number of polls assessed. 


652 


Residents assessed on property, 


487 


Non-resident sassessed on property, 


70 


Number of persons assessed on property, 


557 


For poll tax only, 


274 


Rate of tax per $1,000, 


$29.00 


Number horses assessed, 


365 


Number of cows, 


280 


Number of neat cattle, 


22 


Number of fowls, 


185 


Number of dwelling houses, 


448 


Acres of land, 


9,195 


State tax, 


$6,120.00 


State highway tax, 


$543.51 


County tax, 


$5,545.18 


Town tax, 


$61,455.52 


Overlayings, 


2,796.84 




$76,461.05 


Addition to warrant, 


$ 43.79 


Estimated bank and corporation tax, 


1,000.00 


State Income tax, 


9,054.48 



Value of property exempt from taxation under 
Chap. 490, Acts of 1909 : 

35 



Church property, $46,200.00 

"Omitted assessments" 5,213.21 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 
JOHN R. McGRATH, 
DEWEY J. RYAN, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



36 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following' is respectfully submitted as the Twenty- 
Ninth Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioners : 
We have received the past year as follows: 

Balance on deposit from last year's account ; $3,595.15 

One Victory Bond, 1,000.00 

One Liberty Bond, 1,000.00 

Deposit inAmherst Savings Bank, 1,607.45 

Deposit in Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,057.27 

Deposit in Northampton National Bank, 2,137.70 

Cash from collection of water rents, 5,726.22 

Interest on cash and bonds, first Nat. Bank. 221.73 

Interest on deposit, Northampton Nat. Bank, 84.99 

Interest on deposit Amherst Savings Bank, 73.11 

Interest on deposit, Northampton Inst, for savings, 48.10 



$16551.72 



We have paid the past year as follows : 
Town of Hatfield, $2,900.00 

Salaries of water commissioners, 100.00 

W. H. Riley & Co., supplies, 65.50 

Norwood Engineering Co., (12 service boxes), 54.00 

Northampton Water Dept, labor and supplies.. 163.98 

W. C. Tannatt, Jr., lowering water pipe, 220.90 

F. M. Crittenden, printing water bills, 13.00 
Town of Hatfield, laying water pipe from Main to 

School, 17.25 
W. L. Graves, labor and supplies, 11.73 
Shaw, Hickey & Cook, conference in regard to res- 
ervoir property, 15.00 
E. W. Strong, collecting water rates, labor and cash 

paid, 356.53 



Balance in Treasury, $3,920.89 

37 



Cash on deposit, First National Bank, Northampton, $5,584.78 
One Liberty Bond, 1,000.00 
Deposit Amherst Savings Bank, 1,680.56 
Deposit Northampton National Bank, 2,222.69 
Deposit, Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,105.37 
Deposit, First National Bank. Northampton, Sav- 
ings Department, 1,037.43 



$12630.83 



Total, $16,551.72 

Respectfully submitted, 
JOHN W. KILEY, 
ROSWELL G. BILLINGS, 
L. A. DEINLEIN, 

Water Commissioners. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Water Commissioners of the Town of Hatfield and find them 
correct, with orders on file for all payments made, and a 
balance in the treasury of $12,630.83. 

C. EDWARD WARNER, 

Auditor. 

January 17, 1924. 



38 



Report of Library Trustees 



The report of the librarian covering the work of the li- 
brary for the past year is herewith submitted. 

MARIAN C. BILLINGS 
MARGARET A. MULLANY 
VERNET H. KELLER 

Library Trustees. 



39 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library: 

I take pleasure in reporting* an active and successful year 
in the library. 

Last year ? s circulation of books and magazines we thought 
large, but this year we have exceeded it by 1365 the entire 
circulation being 14,553 ; 7397 in the juvenile department 
and 7156 in the adult. We have received the loan of the 
usual number of books in the Polish language from the State 
Department of Education, and have sent out books as usual 
to Bradstreet, North Hatfield and West Hatfield. 

The selection of books for children is one of the most 
important duties of a country librarian. To this a great deal 
of time and care has been given. 

Of 503 books added to the library this year, 228 were for 
the juvenile department. 

Deposits have been made in the four upper rooms of the 
Center School, 138 books being placed there for circulation 
among the pupils. 

Last spring 42 state certificates were given to pupils who 
had read and written a report on five books taken from the 
lists sent out by the Department of Education. This work 
is being continued this year. 

I quote these words from a Supervisor of Education, 
' ' Library work with children aims chiefly and ideally to make 
reading a joy and not a task, and to establish a love of good 
books as a permanent satisfaction in life." 

I wish to acknowledge here the loyalty of the library 
assistants and the encouraging support of the Board of 
Trustees. 

We regret the resignation of Miss Ryan who for several 
years has been an efficient and faithful worker. 



40 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Balance from Fines of 

Fines 1923 

From Sale of old paper 



1922 



.11 

19.40 
1.85 



Supplies 


$ 7.35 


Assistant 


.60 


Vent of Stove 


.25 


Express and Postage 


4.93 


Books and Magazines 


8.05 


Balance on Hand 


.18 



21,36 



$ 21.36 
ELLEN A. WAITE, Librarian 

BOOKS ENTERED DURING 1923 
Fiction 

Annonymous In the Mountains 

Atherton Black Oxen 

Babcock The Soul of Ann Rutledge 

Babcock The Soul of Abe Lincoln 

Bailey The Glory of Youth 

Bailey The Dim Lantern 

Bartley Up and Coming 
Bergengren Gentlemen All and Merry Companions 

Bennett Riceyman Steps 

Bindloss The Bush Rancher 

Bindloss The Wilderness Patrol 

Black Jo Ellen 

Blanchard The Island Cure 

Bower Jean of Lazy A 

Bower The Lookout Man 

Bower Her Prarie Knight 

Bower The Flying U's Last Stand 

Bower The Long Shadow 

Bower The Quirt 

Brand Alcatraz 

Broun The Bov Grew Older 



41 



Brown 

Brady 

Buchan 

Buck 

Burroughs 

Burnham 

Burt 

Burt 

Burt 

Catcher 

Catcher 

Chapman 

Comfort 

Connolly 

Comstock 

Comstock 

Connor 

Conrad 

Cooper 

Cullum 

Curwood 

Curwood 

Curwood 

Curwood 

Curwood 

Curwood 

DeJeans 

Dell 

Dell 

Dell 

Dell 

Diver 

Dixon 

Dodd 

Douglas 

Dumas 

"Elizabeth 



Old Crow 

The Man Who Won 

Huntingtower 

The Call of the Cumberland 

Jungle Tales of Tarzan 

In Apple Blossom Time 

The Branding Iron 

Q 

The Red Lady 

One of Ours 

A Lost Lady 

Mystery Ranch 

The Public Square 

The U Boat Hunters 

Glenn of the Mountains 

The Shield of Silence 

The Gaspards of Pine Croft 

The Rover 

Sheila of Big Wreck Cove 

Story of Foss River. Ranch 

The Hunted Woman 

Baree Son of Kazan 

The Alaskan 

Isobel 

The Wolf Hunter 

God's Country and the Woman 

The Romance of a Million Dollars 

The Hundredth Chance 

Keeper of the Door 

The Lamp in the Desert 

Tetherstones 

• Lonely Furrows 

The Clansman 

The Girl Next Door 

Ann and Her Mother 

The Count of Monte Cristo 

The Enchanted April 



42 



Erskine 


The River Trail 


Ertz 


Madam Claire 


Evarts 


Tumgleweeds 


Fairbank 


The Courtlands of Washington Square 


Farnol 


Sir John Deering 


Ferber 


Gigols 


Fletcher 


The Paradise Mystery 


Fletcher 


The Lost Mr. Linthwaite 


Fletcher 


The Chestermarke Instinct 


Fletcher 


The Orange Yellow Diamond 


Footner 


Ramshackle House 


Fox 


Little Shepherd of Kingdom Gome 


Friel 


Tiger River 


Gale Zona 


Faint Perfume 


Bibbs 


The Splendid Outcast 


Gilman 


Lorraine 


Gilman 


The Surprising Antonia 


Goodwin 


The Sign of the Serpent 


Green 


The Step on the Stairs 


Gregory 


Judith of Blue Lake Ranch 


Gregory 


Wolf Breed 


Grey, Zane 


Wanderer of the Wastelands 


Grey, Zane 


Light of the Western Stars 


Grey, Zane 


The Lone Star Ranger 


Grey, Zane 


The Desert of Wheat 


Grey, Zane 


Desert Gold 


Grey, Zane 


The Border Legion 


Grey, Zane 


The U P Trail 


Grey, Zane 


The Man of the Forest 


Grey, Zane 


Riders of the Purple Sage 


Harker 


The Really Romantic Age 


Harris 


The House of Helen 


Hendryx 


North 


Hergesheimer 


The Bright Shawl 


Hough 


North of 36 


Hurst 


Lummox 


Irwin 


Lew Tyler's Wives 



43 



Jewell 

Johnston 

Johnston 

Jones 

Jordan 

Johnston 

Kendall 

Kilbourne 

King 

Kyne 

Laing 

Lee 

Lincoln. Joseph 

Lincoln, Natalie 

Locke 

Lockhart 

London, Jack 

London, Jack 

London, Jack 

Livingston 

Lucas 

Lutz 

Lutz 

Lutz 

Lutz 

Lutz 

Lynde 

McCutcheon, G. B. 

McCutcheon, James 

Major 

Manners 

Marshall, E. 

Marshall, A. 

Maxwell 

Miln 

Mitchell 

Nicholson 



The North Decides 

1492 

To Have and To Hold 

The Wedgwood Medallion 

The Next Corner 

The Apartment Next Door 

Benton of the Royal Mounted 

A Corner in William 

The Happy Isle 

Never the Twain Shall Meet 

Wintergreen 

The Mysterious Office 

Doctor Nye 

The Cat's Paw 

The Lengthened Shadow 

The Man from Bitter Root 

Under a Thousand Eyes 

A Daughter of the Snow 

The Valley of the Moon 

Under a Thousand Eyes 

Genevra's Money 

Exit Betty 

Miranda 

Phoebe Deane 

The Man of the Desert 

Tomorrow About This Time 

Mr. Arnold 

Westwind Drift 

An Heir at Large 

When Knighthood was in Flower 

Peg'o My Heart 

The Isle of Retribution 

The School Master of Hessville 

The Day's Journey 

Mr. and Mrs. Sen 

Corduroy 

Broken Barriers 



44 



Niven 

Norris 

'Brien 

Ogden 

Oppenheim 

Oppenheim 

Oyen 

Peddler 

Peddler 

Porter, Eleanor 

Porter, Eleanor 

Porter, Eleanor 

Porter, Jene Stratton 

Prouty 

Poole 

Quick 

Ragsdale 

Raine 

Raine 

Raine 

Raine 

Raine 

Raine 

Reeve 

Reeve 

Reynolds 

Reynolds 

Reynolds 

Richmond 

Rinehart 

Rinehart 

Rinehart 

Rinehart 

Robinson 

Ruck. Berta 

Ruck, Berta 

Ruck, Berta 



The Wolfer 

Butterfly 

Trodden Gold 

Trail's End 

Michael's Evil Deeds 

The Seven Connundrums 

Tarrant of Tin Spout 

The Splendid Folly 

The Vision of Desire 

The Tie That Binds 

The Story of Marco 

Across the Years 

The White Flag 

Stella Dallas 

Millions 

The Hawkeye 

Next Besters 

Man Size 

Gunsight Pass 

Ridgvvay of Montana 

A Texas Ranger 

Iron Heart 

Tangled Trails 

The Soul Scar 

The Film Mystery 

The Judgment of Charis 

The Daughter Pays 

The Lost Discovery 

Rufus 

When a Man Marries 

The Circular Staircase 

Sight Unseen 

The Man in Lower Ten 

Man Proposes 

The Disturbing Charm 

The Girl at his Billet 

The Years for Rachel 



45 



Ruck Bert a 

Sabatini 

Sabatini 

Sabatini 

Scarborough 

Smith 

Sterrett 

Stribling 

Stringer 

Tarkington 

Tarkington 

Thayer 

Tilden 

Tompkins 

Tracy 

Tracy 

Tracy 

Train 

Train 

Trowbridge 

Tuttle 

Webster 

Wells 

Weston 

Weston 

Weston 

White 

Whitehill 

Widdemer 

Williams 

Williamson 

Williamson 

Willoughby 

Willsie 

Willsie 

AVilson 

Wilson 



The Wooing of Rosamond Fayre 

The Snare 

The Sea Hawk 

Scaramoushe 

In the Land of Cotton 

Beyond the Sunset 

Nancy Goes to Town 

Tombombo 

The Wire Tappers 

The Flirt 

The Fascinating Stranger 

The Sinster Mark 

Mr. Podd 

A Line A Ray 

Wings of the Morning 

The Pelham Affair 

Strange Case of Mortimer Fenley 

His Children's Children 

Tutt and Mr. Tutt 

His Grace gives Notice 

Feet of Clay 

Uncle James Shoes 

Raspberry Jam 

The Queen of the World 

You Never Saw Such a Girl 

Oh, Mary be Careful 

The Claim Jumpers 

Mary Cinderella Brown 

Graven Images 

Family 

The Brightener 

The Night Before the Wedding 

Where the Sun Swings North 

Judith of the Godless Valley 

The Exile of the Lariat 

Oh, Doctor 

The Able McLaughlins 



46 



Wodehouse 

Wright 

Young 



Mostly Sally 
The Mine with the Iron Door 
Little Old New York 
Miscellaneous 



Far Away and Long Ago 






W. H. Hudson 


From McKinley to Harding 






Kohlsaat 


From Printer to President 


The Story of Warren Harding 


President Cooiidge 






Whiting 


A Man from Maine 






Edward Bok 


Barnum 






Werner 


Memories of a Hostess 


Letters of Mrs 


James T. Field 


The Tragedy of Lord Kitchner 




Esher 


My Boyhood 






John Burroughs 


James Fenimore Cooper 






Phillips 


A Cycle of Adam's Letters 




Chas. 


Francis Adams 


Adventures of Buffalo Bill 






Cody 


Wodehouse 






Jeeves 


John Paul Jones 






Fraser 


Lincoln's Last Day 






Starr 


He Knew Lincoln 






Tarbell 


One Hundred Noted Men and Women of the 


Screen 


Film Folk 






Wagner 


The Real Billy Sunday 






presented 


Amelia V. Tilestone 






presented 


Trading with Mexico 






Thompson 


Massachusetts Beautiful 






Nutting 


Vagabonding Down the Andes 




Franck 


Through the Brazilian Wilderness 




Roosevelt 


Reconstruction and Constitution 




Burgess 


America First 






Evans 



American Red Cross in the Great War 

The Gorilla Trail • Bradley 

The Fall of the Romanoffs 

Canada, the Spell Binder Whiting 

The Golden Hynde Alfred Noyes 

Norse Mythology Wagner 

The Quare Women . Furmen 



47 



Overton 



Verrill 

Verrill 

Greene 

presented 

presented 

Clark Seelye 

Bret Harte 

Goldsmith 



Real Story of the Pirate 

Trail of the White Indian 

The Lone Winter 

American Nights Entertainment 

Index to Plays for Children 

Early History of Smith College 

The Luck of Roaring Camp 

The Vicar of Wakefield 

The Deserted Village with Gray's Elegy 

Poems of American Patriotism 

Experiences of a Cub Reporter 

Love Conquers All 

A Laugh a Day Keeps the Doctor 

The Gibson Upright 

Stories from Dante 

The Heart of Music 

Opera Stories from Wagner 

Young People's Story of Music 

Good Housekeeping Menus 

A Collection of Cakes 

A Thousand Ways to Please the Family 

The Basketry Book 

Watched by Wild Animals 

Waiting in the Wilderness 

Our Bird Comrades 

Boy's Book of Physics 

The Practice of Auto-Suggestion 

Inter Church World Movement 

For Love's Sake Zimmerman 

Stories to tell Children 

The Volume Library 

Juvenile Department 
Abbott Happy House 

Altsheler The Young Trailer 

Altsheler The Rock of Chickamanga 

Altsheler The Guns of Shiloh 

Altsheler The Quest of the Four 



arr. by Brander Matthews 

Vanderbilt 

Benchley 

Away Irving Cobb 

Tarkington and Wilson 

Cummington 

Chapin 

Akin 

Whit comb 

presented 

presented 



Blanchard 

Mills 

Mills 

Keyser 

Clarke 

Coue 

presented 

presented 

Cowles 

For Reference 



48 



Altsheler 

Altsheler 

Ames 

Arabian Nights 

Bain 

Banks 

Barbour 

Barbour 

Barbour 

Barbour 

Bell 

Blanchard 

Brooks 

Brooks 

Brooks 

Brooks 

Brooks 

Burnham 

Carter 

Chaffee 

Chaffee 

Collins 

Collins 

Crump 

Curtis 

Dickins 

Dowd 

DuChaillu 

Duggan 

Elderice 

Elderdice 

Ellis 

Evarts 

Fitzhugh 

Gould 

Gray 

Gray 



The Scouts of Stonewall 

The Tree of Appomattox 

Pete, Cow Puncher 

Russian Fairy Tales 

Boy's Prescott 

The Crimson Sweater 

The Half-Back 

Quarter-Back Bates 

Over Two Seas 

Smith's Week 

Dear Little Girl at School 

Dorothy Dainty at Foam Ridge 

Dorothy Dainty at Glen Island 

Dorothy Dainty at the Store House 

Dorothy Dainty's Treasure Chest 

Dorothy Dainty's Red Letter Days 

Jewel's Story Book 

Bob Hanson, Scout 

Unexplored 

Trail and Tree Top 

Jack Heaton, Oil Prospector 

The Amateur Chemist 

Boy's Book of Firemen 

Yankee Girl at Bull Run 

A Christmas Carol 

Polly and the Princess 

Stories of the Garilla Country 

Little Cuba Libre 

T. Haviland Hicks, Freshman 

T. Haviland Hicks, Junior 

True Stories About Indians 

Fur Sign 

Pee Wee Harris on the Trail 

Felicia's Visits 

Rusty Miller 

The Other Miller Girl 



49 



Gray 

Gray 

Grey and Wetmore 

Grinnell 

Hale 

Hawkes 

Hawkes 

Hawkes 

Hawkes 

Hawkes 

Hawkes 

Hawkes 

Hawkes 

Hill 

Hornibrook 

Johnson 

Johnston 

Knipe 

Leonard 

Lerrigo 

Long 

MacArthur 

McSpadden 

MacVenn 

Martin 

Masters 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Otis 

Otis 

Paine 

Perry 

Picorine 

Pyle 

Eemick 

Remick 

Richards 



Elsie Marley 

The January Girl 

Last of the Great Scouts 

Jack the Young Trapper 

The Man Without a Country 

Wanted, a Mother 

Pep 

Shovel Horns 

King of the Thundering Herd 

King of the Flying Sledge 

The Way of the Wild 

Dapples of the Circus 

The Trail to the Woods 

Refugee Rock 

Penrose Lorry, Campfire Girls 

The Sky Movies 

Georgina of the Rainbows 

A Maid of 76 

Every-day Susan 

Boy Scout Treasure Hunters 

Wayeeses, the White Wolf 

Daisy 

Boy's Book of Famous Soldiers 

Good Manners Books one and two 

Emmy Lou — Her Book 

Mitch Miller 

Arm of Green Gables 

Emily of New Moon 

Toby Tyler 

Mr. Stubb's Brother 

Cadet of Black Star Line 

The Full-Back 

Story of America 

Tales of Wonder and Magic 

Jane Stewart, Comrade 

Glenlock Girls 

Golden Windows 



50 



Roy 

Sabin 

Sangster 

Seaman 

Seaman 

Seaman 

Seaman 

Sehultz 

Singmaster 

Skinner 

Sparhawk 

Sparhawk 

Sparhawk 

Smith, N. A. 

Smith, M. P. W. 

Stevenson 

Starr 

Taggart 

Taggart 

Taggart 

Tomlinson 

Wallace 

Warde 

Warren 

Wells, Carolyn, 

Wells, Margaret 

Wells, Reuben F. 

Whitcomb 

Winslow 

Winslow 

Widdemer 

Wiggin 

Adams 

Aldine Primer 
Allen 



Polly and Eleanor 

Into Mexico with Gen. Scott 

Little Knights and Ladies 

The Crimson Patch 

The Dragon's Secret 

Melissa Across the Fence 

Tranquillity House 

On the War Path 

Under Many Flags 

Christmas Stories and Plays 

Dorothy Brooks' School Days 

Dorothy Brooks Vacation 

Dorothy Brooks Across the Sea 

The Christmas Child 

Boys of the Border 

Treasure Island 

Strange Lands Near Home 

American Indians 

The Golden Goose 

Daughters of the Little Gray House 

The Queer Little Man 

Scouting on the Border 

The Gaunt Grey Wolf 

Betty Wales, B A 

King Arthur and His Knights 

Patty's Success 

The Present from the Past 

With Caesar's Legions 

Journeys in Italy and Spain 

The United States 

Europe 

Winona on Her Own 

Timothy's Quest 

Pioneer Life for Children 

Aesop 's Fables in Words of One Syllable 

Stories of Wakeland and Dreamland 
51 



Anderson 


Fairy Tales 


Andrews 


Ten Boys 


Bacon 


Hymns Every Child Should Know 


Baker 


Child's Second Book of Poetry 


Bailey 


For the Children's Hour Books one and three 


Baldwin • 


Fairy Readers, Books one and two 


Baldwin 


Gulliver's Travels for Children 


Benton 


A Little Cook Book 




Big Book of Fairy Tales 


Blaisdell 


Twilight Town 


Blaisdell 


Polly and Dolly 


Blaisdell 


Rhymes and Tales 


Blaisdell 


Tommy Tinker's Book 


Blaisdell 


Cherrytree Children 


Blaisdell 


Pretty Polly Flinders 


Blaisdell 


Mother Goose Children 


B radish 


Stories of Country Life 


Bunyan 


Pilgrim's Progress for Children 


Burgess 


Mrs. Peter Rabbit 


Burgess 


Browser, the Hound 


Burgess 


Adventures of Prickly Porky 


Burgess 


Adventures of Paddy, the Beaver 


Burgess 


Adventures of Danny Meadow Mouse 


Burgess 


Adventures of Jerry Muskrat 


Burgess 


Adventures of 01' Mistah Buzzard 


Burgess 


Adventures of Mr. Mocker 


Burgess 


Adventures of Old Man Coyote 


Burgess 


Tommy's Change of Heart 


Burgess 


Tommy's Wishes Come True 


Burgess 


Mother West Wind's "When" Stories 


Carpenter 


Around the World with the Children 


Carroll 


Alice in Wonderland 


Carter 


About Animals 


Carter 


Stories of Brave Dogs 


Coe 


Third Reader 


Cobb 


Clematis 


Cobb 


Arlo 



52 



Pinocchio 

Pinocchio dramatized by Emily Gray 

The Children Who Followed the Piper 

Little Lame Prince 

Robinson Crusoe 

Robinson Crusoe for Little Children 

Playtime Stories 

Fishing and Hunting 

Indian Primer 

Uncle Wiggily Stories 

Jollie and Jillie 

Toodle and Noodle 

Lorraine and the People of Summer 

Snow White 

The Golden Bird 

Raggedy Ann Stories 

Man in the Moon Stories 

The Little Juggler 

Little Gardens for Boys and Girls 

Little Stories About Little Animals 

Some Little Cooks 

The Mary Jane Series 

Book of Cats and Dogs 

Stories for Children 

Story of Dr. Dolittle 

Little Stories for Little People 

Kathleen in Irland 



Collodi 

Collodi 

Colum, Padraic 

Craik 

Defoe 

Defoe 

Dunlap 

Dutton 

Fox 

Garis 

Garis 

Garis 

Gordon 

Grimm 

Grimm 

Gruelle 

Gruelle 

Higgins 

Higgins 

Holton 

Hoyt 

Judson 

Johonnot 

Lane 

Little Black Sambo 

Lofting 

MacCallum 

McDonald 

The Mermaid's Message 

Mi rick Home Life Around the World 

Mother Goose, illustrated by Munroe Orr 

Mulock The Fairy Book 

"Ouida" Moufflou 

Patterson Pussy Meow 

Perkins The Swiss Twins 

Perkins The Eskimo Twins 

Perrault's Fairv Tales 



53 



Porter Trudy and Timothy, Foresters 

Potter Peter Rabbit 

Potter Ginger and Pickles 

Pyle Lazy Matilda 

Pyrnelle Diddie, Dumps and Tot 

Rippey The Goody Naughty Book 

Rippey The Sunny, Sulky Book 

Robin's Christmas Eve 

Serl Workaday Doings 

Sewell Black Beauty 

Silvester Happy Hour Stories 

Simms Child Literature 

Skinner Happy Tales for Story Time 

Smith Jolly Polly 

Snell Little Boy France 

Something to Make 
Something to Read 
Something to Do 

Spyre Mazli 

Smythe Old Time Stories 

Stevenson Child's Garden of Verses 

Thompson East o the Sun, West 'f the Moon 

Usher Story of the Pilgrims for Children 

Verhveff All About Johnny Jones 

Waitt Further Adventures of Molly Waddy and Tony 

When Mother let Us Carpenter 
When Mother let Us Act 
When Mother let Us Sew 
When Mother let Us Make Gifts 

Wilbur The Bear Family at Home 

Williams The Little Red Hen 

William's Readers, one two. three 
Wyss Swiss Family Robinson in Words of One Syllable 

Magazines and Periodicals 
American Magazine 
Good Housekeeping 
Harper's Magazine 

54 



Scribner's Magazine 

National Magazine 

Popular Mechanics 

Review of Reviews 

World's Work 

Science and Invention 

Child Life 

St Nicholas 

Boys' Life 

The American Boy 

Red Cross Courier, presented 

National Republic, presented 

Our Dumb Animals, presented 



55 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1923 



I 



School Organization 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Oscar E. Belden, Chairman ; Term expires 1924 

Adam J. Smith, Secretary, Term expires 1925 

Patrick W. Mullins, Term expires 1926 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Orin A. Morton 

17 Hubbard Avenue, Northampton Telephone 1803-J 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 
A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield schools) 
C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet, and West Hatfield 
schools) 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 





E. L. 


Graves 








SCHOOL CENSUS 








April 


1, 1923 










Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


5 and 7, 




100 


88 


188 


7 and 14, 




241 


229 


470 


14 and 16, 




47 


34 


81 



388 351 739 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy 
First Winter Term — 7 weeks Opens January 2, 1924 

Closes February 15, 1924 
Second Winter Term — 8 weeks Opens February 25, 1924 

Closes April 18, 1924 
Spring Term — 8 weeks Opens April 28, 1924 

Closes June 20, 1924 
Fall Term — 15 weeks Opens September 8, 1924 

Closes December 19, 1924 
First Winter Term Opens December 29, 1924 

59 



No school on legal holidays and Good Friday. 

Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week and 
reopen the following Monday. 

• When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following- 
Monday is observed as a holiday. Legal holidays in Massa- 
chusetts include January first. February twenty-second, 
April nineteenth, May thirtieth, July Fourth, the first Mon- 
day in September, October twelfth, Thanksgiving day and 
Christmas day. 



60 



Report of the School Committee 



In our School report for the year 1923, we wish to call 
your attention the large increase in the cost of fuel over 1922. 
We commenced the year with very little coal on hand and 
were compelled to purchase in small quantities through the 
winter at exhorbitant prices, also paying delivery charges 
which were high on account of the almost impassable roads. 

During the summer and fall we have been able to fill 
all buildings to their holding capacity and thus have a large 
amount on hand at the present time. 

We have made repairs, redecorated rooms and overhauled 
heating plants wherever necessary to keep buildings in good 
servicable conditions for future use. 

All buildings are in good condition now, excepting the 
one at North Hatfield. It is almost impossible to heat this 
building in cold weather and school has to be closed on ex- 
ceedingly cold days. We consider it unwise to expend any 
large sums on the heating plant of a building in such poor 
condition as this one. We recommend that steps be taken 
toward the construction of a new school building in North 
Hatfield in the near future. 

In August we lost, by resignation, the services of our 
efficient superintendent. Mr. C. J. Kichards, who had been 
with us for several years, and had Avon the respect and hi^h 
esteem of all who knew him. 

At a joint meeting with Hadley, Mr. 0. A. Morton was 
elected to the superintendence* of the union and is success- 
fully carrying on the work. His report will be issued at the 
close of the school year. 

61 



We call to your attention the steady increase in the num- 
ber of pupils each year in our schools. Our housing and 
seating capacity are already taxed to the limit. If this in- 
crease continues, some provision will have to be made in the 
fall for more room. 

In closing, we thank our superintendent and teachers 
for their loyalty and co-operation in their work. 

OSCAR E. BELDEN, 
ADAM J. SMITH, 
PATRICK W. MULLINS. 



62 



Financial Statement 



For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1923 
RECEIPTS 

From State : 



General School Fund, 


$6136.25 




Superintendent of Schools, 1923, 


918.76 




Americanization, 


162.83 




Vocational Education, 


1,555.87 




Smith-Hughes Fund, 


92.26 


$8,865.97 






Dog Tax, 




152.48 


Old desks and other supplies sold. 




107.58 


Northampton tuition, 




302.00 


Boston City Wards, tuition, 




34.72 


Academy Trustees, 




600.00 


Refunds, 




30.44 


Town Appropriation, 




36.000.00 


Overdraft, 




1,032.34 




$47,125.53 


EXPENDITURES 






School Committee, 


$75.00 




Superintendent of Schools, and At- 






tendance Officer, 


1,805.00 




Supervisors, 


1,520.00 




Teachers — High School, 


11,625.43 




Teachers — Elementary Schools, 


18,977.90 




Teachers — Americanization, 


349.00 




School Nurse, 


900.00 




Books and Supplies, 


2,36916 




Janitors and cleaning, 


2,905.52 




Fuel, 


4,662.49 




Repairs, 


1,09610 




Transportation — Elementary, 


60.00 




Miscellaneous, 


779.93 


$47,125.53 



63 






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TOWN OFFICERS 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



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METCALF 

PRINTING & PUBLISHING 

COMPANY 

NJorthampton. Mass.. 



Finance Committee 



Articles in the Warrant 

For The Town Meeting, February 2, 1925 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Hatfield, in said County. Greeting: 

In the name of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town of Hatfield qualified to vote in the elections and town 
affairs, to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, 
the 2nd day of February, next at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 
then and there to act on the following articles, to wit; 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year ;- — Town Clerk ; three Selectmen ; one Assessor 
for one year ; one Assessor for three years ; Town Treasurer, 
one member of School Committee for three years ; one Water 
Commissioner for three years ; one sinking Fund Commis- 
sioner for three years ; Auditor ; Tax Collector ; Director of 
Hampshire Trustees for County Aid to Agriculture ; Tree 
Warden ; Elector under the Will of Oliver Smith ; Trustee of 
Public Library for three years ; Six Constables ; and to vote 
on the question "YES" or "NO"— Shall license be granted 
for sale of certain non-intoxicating beverages in this town? 

All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 

3 



and kept open for at least four hours, and for such longer 
time as the majority of the voters present shall direct, but 
in no case shall they be kept open after the hour of eight 
o'clock in the evening. 

Article 3. To hear the reports of the various town offi- 
cers and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5. To take action in relation to the payment of 
12th note and interest, on Center School, amount recom- 
mended $2,765.00 

Article 6. To take action in relation to maintenance, 
ordinary repairs on highways, bridges, sewers and sidewalks 
The Finance Committee recommend $10,000.00 

Article 7. To take action in relation to raising and ap- 
propriating money to pay bonds of town officers. 
The Finance Committee recommend 100.00 

Article 8. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money to defray expense of Memorial Hall for ensuing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend 200.00 

Article 9. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Tree Warden, Gypsy, and Brown Tail Moth work. 
The Finance Committee recommend 750.00 

Article 10. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Inspection of Animals. 
The Finance Committee recommend 300.00 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for supplies and maintenance of the Fire Department. 
The Finance Committee recommend 800.00 

Article 12. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for insurance. 
The Finance Committee recommend 1,500.00 



Article 13. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for contingencies. 
The Finance Committee recommend 1,500.00 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the care of the poor for the ensuing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend 2 000.00 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of interest. 
The Finance Committee recommend 3,000.00 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of salaries of town officers. 
The Finance Committee recommend 2 300.00 

Aritcle 17. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the maintenance of the schools fon ensuing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend 37,500.00 

Article 18. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the employment of one or more School Physicians, 
under Chap. 502 Acts 1906. 
The Finance Committee recommend 100.00 

Article 19. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the care of cemeteries. 
The Finance Committee recommend 100.00 

x\ritcle 20. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Memorial Day. 
The Finance Committee recommend 125.00 

Article 21. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend 850.00 

Article 22. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of tuition, Hatfield students attending 
the Smith Industrial School. 
The Finance Committee recommend 300.00 



Article 23. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the support of the Hampshire Trustees for County 
Aid to Agriculture per Chap. 273 of the Acts 1918. 

The Finance Committee recommend 150.00 

Article 24. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for extension of cement walk on Maple St. 
The Finance Committee recommends $1,000.00 

Article 25. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for a cement walk on Main Street, North from Thos, 
O'Dea's place. Finance Committee recommend $500.00 

Article 26. To see if the town w T ill raise and appropriate 
money for Street Lights. 
The Finance Committee recommend 4,500.00 

Artile 27. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
• the sum of $2,000.00— together with $3,000.00 from the State 
and $1,000.00 from the County, to be expended in completing 
stone road to Bradstreet or act thereon under Chapter 90 
Gen Laws, The above article is recommended by the Finance 
Committee. 

Article 28. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Police Protection for the ensuing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend 2,250.00 

Article 29. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for purchase of Play Ground for Bradstreet School. 
The Finance Committee recommend 700.00 



Total of the amounts recommended $75,290.00 

J. C. RYAN 
HUGH McLEOD 
W. L. BELDING 

Finance Committee. 



Article 30. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to the improvement of the Fire Department. 

Article 31. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to the disposition of the refund of the Soldiers' Bonus 
Fund from the State Treasurer, and funds on hand from 
Honor Roll Fund. On hand from Honor Roll, $22.65. Re- 
fund Bonus Tax, $1,339.41. 

Article 32. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money fo a lot and new three-room school house at North 
Hatfield and appoint a building committee. 

Article 33. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money to repair the present school building, and to enlarge 
the lot at North Hatfield. 

Article 34. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
the cum of four hundred dollars to purchase a power spray- 
ing outfit and the materials necessary for the use of the agri- 
cultural department of Smith Academy to be used for edu- 
cational and community purposes. 

Article 35. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money in anticipation of the revenue of the current fiscal 
year. 

Article 36. To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 



Selectmen's Report 



INSPECTION OF ANIMALS 




E. S. Warner, 




$293.00 


F. T. Bardwell, 




148.40 




$441.40 


Appropriation, 


$250.00 
TOWN HALL 




Amherst Gas Co., 




$15.34 


H. Pelham, 




9.00 


F. G. Howard, 




2.40 


Max Kugler, 




8.00 


W. L. Graves, 




9.90 


Merrick Lumber Co., 




13.11 



$57.75 
Receipts, $141.00 

INTEREST 

Northampton National Bank on notes, $2,549.56 

Commonwealth of Mass., Water Bonds, 1,720.00 

M. J. Ryan, 298.00 



$4,567.56 



Appropriation, 
Other Receipts, 


$3,000.00 
2,204.15 




SCHO' 
C. A. Byrne, 
A. J. Bonneville, 


OL PHYSICIANS 

$100.00 
8 


$50.00 
50.00 


Appropriation, 


$100.00 



CARE OF CEMETERIES 



P. H. Bardwell, 


$100.00 


Appropriation, $100.00 




MEMORIAL DAY 




Band, 


$70.00 


S. W. Kingsley, 


10.00 


J. W. Heffernan, 


54.00 



$134.00 
Appropriation, $125.00 

SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Smith Industrial School, $686.25 

Appropriation, $300.00 

AID TO AGRICULTURE HAMPSHIRE CO. 

Treasurer Hampshire Aid to Agriculture, $150.00 

Appropriation, $150.00 



POOR ACCOUNT 




J. S. Bardwell, 


$ 79.40 


F. G. Howard, 


361.04 


A. L. Strong, 


24.00 


Shea & Fortch, 


174.22 


H! Pellam, 


10.00 


P. Ahearn & Co., 


38.00 


Hamp. Co. Sanitarium, 


486.00 


J. Pelc, 


49.73 


Dept. Public Welfare, 


74.00 


City of Northampton, 


183.00 


C. A. Byrne, 


72.00 


W. H. Dickinson, 


120.00 


H. D. Smith, 


16.22 


Cooley Dickinson Hospital, 


101.75 


Mass. Hospital School, 


189.99 



$1,979.35 



Appropriation, $2,000.00 

Receipts, 285.25 



$2,285.25 
TOWN OFFICERS 



C. E. Warner, 




$ 12.00 


G. R. Billings, 




75.00 


C. S. Strong, 




5.00 


M. H. Dwight, 




263.00 


E. W. Strong, 




75.00 


J. R. McGrath, 




349.00 


J. E. Godin, 




25.00 


Marion Billings, 




20.00 


L. H. Kingsley, 




528.85 


V. H. Keller, 




542.21 


Mary McGlynn, 




10.00 


Dewy Ryan, 




5.00 


T. W. Ryan, 




10.00 


L. H. Billings, 




10.00 


R, W. Webber, 




10.00 


A. J. Godin, 




150.00 




$2,090.06 


Appropriation, 


$2,300.00 




Receipts, 


45.55 






$2,345.55 




CONTINGENT 




Shaw, Cook & Hickey, 




$ 93.00 


O'Brien & O'Brien, 




50.00 


P. R. Mullaney, 




22.08 


J. S. Bardwell, 




10.25 


J. L. Warner, 




5.00 


E. A. Breor, 




34.50 


Amherst Gas Co., 




19.50 



10 



II 


Pellam, 


II 


L. Howard, 


G. 


H. McGill, 


Prof. H. E. Wells, 


Metcalf Ptg. Co., 


J. 


J. Betsold, 


Buffalo Steam Roller Co., 


A. 


J. Godin, 


F. 


G. Howard, 


Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co 


Wales Adding Machine Co., 


No. Hatfield Grain Co., 


A. 


L. Strong Est., 


Commonwealth of Mass., 


M 


H. Dwight, 


J. 


Small, 


A. 


Breor 2nd., 


J. 


Raffa, 


M 


Rizaritz, 


Leo Newman, 


E. 


Slurales, 


F. 


Skeezrelas, 


R. 


J. McGrath, 


J. 


R. McGrath, 


F. 


T. Bardwell, 


R. 


H. Smith, 


M 


Dulaski, 


a. 


T. Bagnall, 


j. 


W. Heffernan, 


c. 


H. Chase, 


H. 


S. Gere & Son, 


John King, 


C. 


A. Bryne, 


Est. L. H. Kingsley, 


A. 


S. Bartlett, 


Consolidated Dry Goods Co., 


G. 


Henry Calrk, 



94.00 

29.63 

55.00 

10.00 

277.50 

39.00 

43.87 

3.25 

.80 

1.50 

5.61 

27.39 

26.00 

12.00 

57.40 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

• 2.75 

1.25 

23.00 

1.78 

10.00 

7.34 

3.60 

14.80 

7.60 

3.50 

3.00 

125.00 

.90 

4.02 

6.00 



11 



E. E. Davis, 309.55 

Hobbs & "Warren, 28.20 

C. H. Crafts, 7.50 

Commercial College, 1.00 

V. H. Keller, 7.21 

Mabel B. Howard, 1.20 

W. & L. E. Gurley, 3.25 

S. Krukoski, 9.00 



$1,533.19 



Appropriation, $1,500.00 

ORDINARY HIGHWAY 
Snow Account: 

Hatfield Garage, $ 776.41 

J. LeVitie, 24.00 

J. L. Boyle, 6.00 

F. Betsold, 3.00 

A. Doppman, 3.00 

S. Bnisko, 1.00 

J. Vollinger, 3.00 

A. Bieleski, 4.00 

J. L. Day, 4.00 

$824.41 

Hatfield Garage, 432.46 

J. S. Bardwell, 311.00 

M. W. Boyle, 25.00 

M. B. Ryan, 822.00 

John M. Wentzel, 593.27 

James Butler, 155.00 

John Small, 34.00 

P. A. Shumway, 488.88 

F. T. Bardwell 96.00 

LeVetrie Bros., 8.25 

Pittsfield Auto Radiator Works, 10.85 

H. L. Stoddard, 224.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, 72.17 

12 



Joseph Mitcheki, 6.75 

Toney Marchineski, 505.00 

Anton ey Novak, 436.00 

J. T. Powers, 622.00 

J. Kosakoski, 2.00 

F. G. Vollinger, 20.00 

H. D. Smith, 9.05 

Scott Harris, 8.00 

Eugena Jubenville, 8.00 

P. T. Boyle, 12.00 

W. R. Cutter, 36.00 

Paul Zimma, 262.00 

F. Petrikowski, 2.00 

Hamp. Co., Comm., 3.00 

Carlson & Barger, 7.80 

F. G. Howard, 51.48 

Foster-Farrar, 7.94 

J. S. Lane & Son, 872.56 

North Hatfield Grain Co., 5.40 

W. H. Riley, 36.94 

J. A. Sullivan & Co., 55.79 

Whitcomb Cash Grocery, 18.68 

J. L. Boyle, 252.00 

Wm. Fox, 14.00 

Alex Sliwoski, 14.00 

Alex Kasel, 14.00 

Frank Rogaleski, 6.00 

Alfred Howard, 11.00 

N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R., 65.30 

Merrick Lumber Co., 29.28 

J. Fusek, 4.00 

E. W. Dickinson, 61.20 

J. Geis, 78.00 

C. SemkorsM. 71.00 

L. Newman, 48.00 

A. B. Woffram, painting bridges, 418.50 

M. Dulaski. 45.00 



13 



J. Tobacco, 


4.00 


Barrett Co., 


2,149.63 


J. Pashik, 


35.00 


Fritz Backen, 


5.25 


Chilson 's, 


1.25 


Northampton Welding Co., 


1.00 


Rubber Store, 


.75 


John Mullins, 


10.00 


Frank S. Parsons, 


57.87 


A. R. Breor, 


22.80 


Buffalo Roller Co., 


4.75 


B. E. Davis, 


22.50 


C. A. Maynard, 


18.00 


Northampton Radiator oC, 


8.75 


Registry Motor Vehicles, 


2.00 


Northampton Battery Co., 


2.50 


S. W. Kingsley, 


16.10 


James L. Day, 


3.70 


A. L. Strong Est., 


10.05 


W. H. Dickinson, 


11.70 


Charles Eberlien, 


93.55 


M. J. Ryan, 


45.25 


Webster Box Co., 


.68 


M. C. Bailey, 


12.93 


C. H. Crafts, 


12.56 


Berlin Construction Co., 


1,283.07 


" 


$12,112.60 


Appropriation, $12,000.00 




Receipts, 852.28 




$12,852.28 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 




A. R. Breor, 


$1,386.75 


Chase Motor Co., 


452.35 


Foster-Farrar, 


11.00 



14 



Hatfield Garage, 


241.51 


Proulx & Fitzgerald, 


13.25 


George Newman, 


24.00 


H. E. Wells, 


30.00 


H. Pelham, 


9.00 


William Shea, 


12.00 


R. J. McGrath, 


34.10 


0. E. Belden & Son, 


5.00 


Over-Land Garage, 


10.00 


F. J. Reardon, 


7.40 


H. Foote, 


1.72 


Chilson's Auto Top Shop, 


23.70 


Registrar Motor Vehicles, 


10.00 


S. M. Burdon, 


2.00 


L. W. Kingsley, 


10.00 


George Gilbert, Lockup Fees, 


21.00 


G. Whitcomb, 


4.57 


Boyle & McGlynn, 


30.00 




$2,339.35 


Appropriation, $2,000.00 




Receipts, court fines, 1,711.95 





$3,711.95 



PROSPECT AND SCHOOL STREET SIDEWALKS 

J. T. Powers, $58.00 

J. L. Boyle, 40.00 

P. Zimmna, 42.00 

M. B. Ryan, 33.00 

John Wentzel, 22.00 

H. L. Stoddard, 18.00 

Toney, 22.00 

Toney Novak, 22.00 

H. Kingsley, 20.00 

H. Pelham, 6.00 

15 



G. Deinlein, 4.00 

M. Dulaski, 191.00 

H. D. Smith, 232.00 

Hatfield Garage, 4.76 

A. H. Beers, 7.50 

Franklin County Lumber Co., 10.68 

John Bitner, 8.45 



..$741.39 



Appropriation, $1,000.00 

MEMORIAL HALL 

W. P. Boyle, $5.20 

F. G. Howard, 5.82 

North Hatfield Grain Co., 90.86 

H. D. Smith, 142.13 

Hebert Brothers, 27.00 

M. H. Dwight, 14.43 



$285.44 

Appropriation, $200.00 

TREE WARDEN AND GYPSY MOTH 

J. S. Bardwell, $124.00 

John Breor, 100.00 

F. H. Benoit, 877.25 

C. Srinkoski, 12.00 

M. B. Ryan, 22.50 

Gordon Billings, 54.00 

Walter Day, 54.00 

John M. Wentzel, 8.00 

J. L. McGrath, 4.00 

Gleason Brothers, 26.00 

Foster-Farrar Co., 6.75 

R. G. Billings, 20.00 

M. Crawford, 52.00 



16 



Charles Eberlien, 6.20 

John King, 2.25 



$1,368.95 
Appropriation, $500.00 

STREET LIGHTS 



Amherst Gas Co., 




$4,363.67 


Appropriation, 


$4,339.00 
INSURANCE 




H. L. Howard, 




$215.40 


Boyle & McGlynn, 




12.00 


Mable Howard, 




106.40 




$333.80 


Appropriation, 


$500.00 




BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 




Boyle & McGlynn, 




$184.00 


Appropriation, 


$100.00 
OLD BILLS 




A. J. Smith, 




$60.00 


W. C. Tannatt, Jr., 




1,624.97 


M. C. Moulton, 




510.53 


E. S. Peefer, 




58.56 


G. R. Billings, 




21.17 


E. L. Graves, 




550.00 


Howes Brick Co., 




30.00 


A. R. Breor, 




173.30 


Walter Baker Co., 




2.10 


W. R. Cutter, 




12.00 


H. S. Gere & Sons, 




64.93 


F. G. Howard, 




136.66 



17 



H. L. Howard, 




68.60 


Northampton Brick Co., 




36.00 


Northampton Iron Works, 




126.30 


M. J. Brennan, 




8.25 


Reo Garage, 




77.87 


Shaw, Hickey & Cook, 




950.10 


J. S. Bardwell, 




20.00 


E. W. Strong, 




27.25 


J. S. Lane & Sons, 




12.52 

• 




$4,571.11 


Appropriation, 


none 




LIBRARY 




E. A. Waite, 




$171.45 


V. S. Weller, 




51.00 


Amherst Gas Co., 




39.26 


Huritburg Co., 




88.45 


D. C. Heath Co., 




37.55 


Sherwoods, 




254.70 


Gaylord Brothers, 




4.90 


Johnson's Book Store, 




8.38 


Bridgman & Lyman, 




21.91 


V. H. Keller. 




77.00 


Standard Book Co., 




2.95 


Jack McLeod, 




. 2.40 


E. Howard. 




25.80 


F. G. Howard, 




.93 


C. C. Cutter, 




39.90 


Reagil Co., 




7.30 


M. C. Billings, 




5.70 


Mrs. Danforth, 




6.00 


Mrs. L. S. Billings, 




4.00 


Alice Kacuski, 




2.00 


A. R. Wormath, 




8.42 


Library Book, 




18.42 



18 



$878.42 



Appropriation, 


$850.00 




Other Receipts, 


10.00 






$860.00 




CULVERT GORES BROOK 




M. B. Ryan, 




$22.50 


J. Wentzel, 




18.00 


T. Novak, 




8.00 


T. Marcinaswoki, 




18.00 


Metal Culvert, 




19.20 




$85.70 


Appropriation, 


$100.00 




KING STREET SEWER 




M. B. Ryan, 




$48.00 


J. Wentzel, 




32.00 


L. Newman, 




32.00 


C. Scwkoski, 




28.00 


J. Geis, 




32.00 


T. Novak, 




28.00 


P. Zimma. 




32.00 


T. Marconowski, 




28.00 


D. Ryan, 




3.00 


A. H. Beers, 




5.00 


Northampton Iron Works, 


21.70 


W. H. Riley & Co., 




151.36 


Shumway & Riley, 




80.22 




$521.28 


Appropriation, 


$500.00 
NOTES PAID 




Note No. 17, 




$10,000.00 


Note No. 18, 




10,000.00 




$20,000.00 


Money Borrowed, 


$20,000.00 
19 





BRADSTREET STONE ROAD 

M. B. Ryan, $540.00 

J. T. Powers, 486.00 

J. L. Boyle, 334.00 

J. Wentzel, 309.00 

T. Marcronowski, 267.00 

T. Novak, 307.00 

P. Zimma, 320.00 

J. Geis, 304.00 

C. Sunkoski, 279.00 

J. Butraek, . 127.00 

B. Nazio, 131.00 
J. Vanick, 131.00 
J. Chalka, 115.00 
J. Wilkes, 67.00 
P. T. Bridges, 399.75 

C. Peabody, 414.00 
L. D. Roches, 777.00 
H. W. Wolfram, 376.50 
Town of Hatfield, 706.00 
Hatfield Garage, 79.55 
H. L. Stoddard, 78.00 
H. D. Smith, 267.59 
H. Morrell. 428.00 
J. Fusek. 55.00 
S. Onasta, 8.00 
M. Duda, 4.00 
Leo Numan, 124.00 
J. Chanor, 16.00 
Gleason Brothers, 21.00 
A. Donnis. 59.50 
North Hatfield Grain Co., 11.05 
Hebert Brothers, 45.31 
W. C. Tannatt. 39.75 
N. E. Metal Co.. '. 103.74 
E. N. Dickinson, 294.75 



20 



J. S. Lane & Sons, 




4,665.09 


Mass. Broken Stone Co., 




466.92 


M. C. Bailey & Co., 




178.96 


LaFleur Brothers, 




56.10 


Barrett Company, 




2,645.60 




$16,038.16 


Appropriation, 


$6,000.00 




State, 


6,000.00 




County, 


4,000.00 





$16,000.00 

FOREST FIRES 

F. T. Bardwell, warden, $324.75 

Appropriation, none 

BARNES KELLEY DAMAGE SUIT 

Shaw, Hickey & Cook, $1,580.55 

Appropriation, none 

11TH PAYMENT & INTEREST ON CENTER SCHOOL 

Note No. 24 and interest, $2,450.00 

Note No. 25, interest, 405.00 



$2,855.00 



Appropriation, $2,900.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

A. R. Breor, $150.00 

R. J. Graves, 5.00 

G. T. Betsold, 20.00 

F. T. Bardwell, 33.50 

G. Billings, 10.00 
R. D. Graves, 15.00 

21 



H. Pellam, 3.00 

J. Vachula, 20.50 

J. Steele, 5.00 

Hatfield Garage, 61.50 

M. H. Dwight, 3.00 

C. H. Crafts, 40.00 
Thomas Walsh, 4.50 
Band, muster, 115.00 
J. Raffa, prize, 3.00 

F. Yarrows, prize, 2.50 
Polish Society, prize, 15.00 
Woman's Endeavor^ prize, 5.00 
Real Folks, prize, 10.00 
Delphian, prize, 10.00 
Henry Labbee, 15.00 
William Shea, 32.00 
Proulx & Fitzgerald, 2.25 
Herald Job Print, 24.50 

G. Cruickshank, 2.20 

F. G. Howard, 1.00 
U. S. Rubber Co, 375.00 
H. Purseglove, 28.00 
J. Chandler, 10.00 
M. J. Ryan, 3.65 

G. H. Newman, 5.00 

$1,030.10 
Appropriation, $1,000.00 

SCHOOLS 

H. J. Talmage $ 807.50 

F. H. Hale, 570.00 

H. C. Wilcox, 1,470.00 

R. W. Proctor, 920.00 

D. W. Belcher, 1,354.28 
Cora Graves, 743.15 
Mae Toole, 513.50 

22 



Mary E. Ryan, 1,465.00 

M. D. Amelio, 855.00 

Ellen E. Selkirk, 823.00 

Louise R. Frisbee, 456.00 

Frances R. Burt, 766.00 

C. E. Larkin, 1,684.35 

Mary E. Powers, 1,235.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, 1,000.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, 985.00 

Grace W. Bardwell, 1,000.00 

Elizabeth P. Wickes, 570.00 

Sarah C. Quinn, 342.00 

Rachel J. Palmer, 570.00 

Rowena F. Damon, 342.00 

Jacquelin C. Farnsworth, 538.00 

Helen F. O'Leary, 342.00 

M. Elizabeth Boyle, 950.00 

Mildred Boyle, 851.88 

Lena P. Fitzgerald, 967.50 

Eleanor R, Whalen, 977.50 

Harriet E. Jordan, 825.00 

Beatrice Rossmeist, 513.00 

Margaret B. Schmitter, 342.00 

Ann V. Heffernan, ■ 456.00 

Catherine B. Brace, 988.00 

Mary D. Donelson, 1,000.00 

Rhena M. Mills, 361.00 

Firdonia Leitch, 883.50 

Maud E. Boyle, 790.00 

Bernice Bradley, 738.00 

Margaret P. Ryan, 142.50 

Mrs. G Belden, 40.00 

Mrs. N. E. Honney, 5.00 

Mrs. D. Mulaney, 50.00 

Marion C. Billings, 160.00 

Mrs. E. L. Graves, 10.00 

Nora M. Clifford, 87.50 

23 



Mrs. N. C. Palmer, 


20.00 


Gertrude Phillips, 


900.00 


0. A. Morton, 


1,400.00 


E. L. Graves, 


282.00 


A. R. Breor, 


18.00 


Frank Brehen, 


1,828.56 


Telephone, 


41.70 


Electricity, 


268.01 


School Committee, 


201.00 


Auto Class, 


142.00 


Repairs, 


1,022.01 


G. D. Kingsley, 


361,75 


Mrs. J. K. Holt, 


264.30 


Margaret M. Nolan, 


342.00 


Teachers' Retirement Fund, 


1,292.60 


Mrs. Jos. Liebel, 


261.50 


John Salvas, 


222.25 


Mrs. M. L. Ryan, 


5.00 


L. Tircartin, 


66.00 


Hilda Cor man, 


342.00 


Expense, 


1,125.74 


Supplies, 


3,543.27 


H. D. Smith, coal, 


2,133.83 


N. Hatfield Grain Co., coal, 


942.18 


H. W. Wolfram, coal, 


42.30 


. 


$47 ; 558.16 


Appropriation, $36,000.00 




Other Receipts, 13,300.88 





$49,300.88 



SCHOOLS, SPECIAL 



Bradstreet Building : 
W. P. Boyle, 
J. J. Hogan Co., 



$873.00 
408.20 



24 



A. J. Godin, 116.25 

Slatington Slate Co., 48.44 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, 400.07 

W. H. Riley & Co., 305.32 



)ol Street Building : 




W. P. Boyle, 


$2,036.12 


J. J. Hogan Co., 


354.25 


W. L. Graves, 


714.94 


W. H. Riley & Co., 


32.20 


J. B. Kennedy, 


2,831.00 


Slatington Slate Co., 


156.02 


Kenny Bro. & Walkins, 


664.18 



2,151.28 



6,788.71 
Bradstreet, School Street and No. Hatfield Buildings : 

Carl S. Putnam, $288.00 

RECAPITULATION 

Bradstreet, $2,151.28 

School Street, 6,788.71 

Bradstreet, School Street and No. 

Hatfield, 288.00 

$ 9,227.90 



Appropriation, $8,000.00 

RECAPITULATION OF ACCOUNTS 

Culvert at Gores Brook, $ 85.70 

King Street Sewer, 521.28 

Inspection of Animals, 441.40 

Town Hall, 57.75 

Notes Paid, No. 17 and 18, 20,000.00 

Interest, 4,567.56 

25 



School Physicians, 


100.00 


Care Cemeteries, 


100.00 


Memorial Day, 


134.00 


Smith Industrial School, 


686.25 


Hampshire County Aid to Agriculture, 


150.00 


Old Bills, 


4,571.11 


Library, 


878.42 


Memorial Hall, 


285.44 


Tree Warden & Gypsy Moth, 


1,368.95 


Street Lights, 


4,363.67 


Insurance, 


333.80 


Bonds Town Officers, 


184.00 


Highway Ordinary Repairs, 


12,112.00 


Contingent Account, 


1,533.19 


Bradstreet Stone Road, 


16,038.16 


Forest Fires, 


324.75 


Barnes, Kelly Damage Suit, 


1,580.55 


list Payment and Interest Center School Note, 


2,855.00 


Police Department, 


2,339.35 


Prospect and School Street Sidewalks, 


741.39 


Fire Department, 


1,030.10 


Poor Account, 


1,979.35 


Salaries of Town Officers, 


2,090.66 


School Repairs Special, 


9,227.99 


Schools, 


47,558.16 


Total payments, 


$138,239.98 


Total appropriations and receipts, 


134,365.06 



Deficit for the year, $3,874.92 

The above overdraft is due to the large amount of old 
bills inherited from the former administration, and to un- 
forseen bills such as the Barnes-Kelly, damage case, so far 

26 



as we know practically all of the 1924 bills against the town 
are paid, and we start the year 1925 with a clean slate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
ROBERT J. McGRATH, 2nd, 
ROSWELL G. BILLINGS, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 

January 19, 1925. 

I have this day examined the accounts of the Selectmen 
and find them correct. 

CHARLES W. WADE, Auditor. 



27 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD, 1925. 

Wm. L. Belden 
Clifford L. Belden 
Michael Brennan 
Frank J. Betsold 
Paul E. Balise 
John H. Day 
E. N. Dickinson 
L. A. Deinlein 
Joseph Deinlein 
Joseph Dippolt 
Raymond Donellson 
Charles Flynn 
R. J. Fitzgerald 
H. E. Graves 
Joseph Goller 
Ercent Godin 
Fred G. Howard 
Frederick Jubenville 
Harry Marsh 
James Mullens 
John R. McGrath 
Thomas Mullaney 
Fred A. Pease 
Thomas Nolan 
Chas Pfieffer 
John T. Powers 
Daniel Riley 
D. P. Sheehan 
Ralph Strong 
Michael Saycllowski 
Joseph E. Wight 
George 0. Whitcomb 
Henry Wolfram 



!S 



Treasurer's Report 



Late, L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, of the Town of Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To balance in Treasury Jan. 1, 1924, 

Rent Town Hall, 

Cash from E. L. Graves, Col. Taxes, 1921, 

Cash from E. L. Graves, Col. Taxes, 1922, 

Cash from E. L. Graves, Col. Tax sale, 

Cash L. H. Kingsley, Col., 1923 Taxes, 

State Corporation Tax, 

Hampshire County Refund Dog Tax, 

Treasurer Smith Academy, 

State Treasurer, Corp. Tax, 

State Treasurer, Vocational Education, 

State Treasurer, Income Tax, 

State Treasurer, Income Tax, 

Police Dept, District Court Fines, 

Registrar Motor Vehicles, 

License Fees, 

L. A. Deinlein, Treas. Water Board, 

Aloisi Bond, 

$31,363.38 



$5,117.55 


55.50 


$1,018.87 


5,139.83 


8.40 


12,384.50 


48.82 


114.61 


500.00 


118.65 


3,089.99 


107.91 


331.50 


793.25 


18.00 


16.00 


1,500.00 


1,000.00 



Cr. 

By Cash Paid on Selectmen's orders, $30,060.71 
By Cash Paid District Court fines, 64.70 

By balance turned over to V. H. Keller, 1,237.97 

$31,363.38 

29 



V. H. Keller, Temporary Town Treasurer, in account with 
the Town of Hatfield. 



Dr. 



To balance received from L. H. Kingsley, $1,237.97 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, 

Collector, 1922 Tax, 1,307.45 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, 

Collector, 1923 Poll Tax, 295.00 

Cash received from E. L. Graves, 

Collector Exp. 1922 sale, - 16.55 

Cash received from L. H. Kingsley, 

Collector 1923 Property Tax, 376.79 

Cash received from M. H. Dwight, 

Collector 1924 Poll Tax, 1,302.00 

Cash received from M. H. Dwight, 

Collector 1924 Property Tax, 
Cash received from M. H. Dwight, 

Collector, 1923 Property Tax, 
Cash received from License fees, 
Cash received from Rent Town Hall (H. Pellam), 
L. H. Deinlein, Treas. Water Commissioners, 

Interest on Water Bonds, 
L. H. Deinlein for repairs on water main, 
Treasurer of Commonwealth, Corp. Tax., 
Treasurer of Commonwealth, Dept. Education. 
Treasurer of Commonwealth Income Tax, Schools, 
Treasurer of Commonwealth Income Tax 

General fund. 
Treasurer of Commonwealth Nat Bank Tax, 
Treasurer' of Commonwealth War Bonus refund. 
City of Northampton, School Fund, children 

in Hatfield Schools, 
School Dept., Refund from Metcalf Ptg. Co.. 
Interest from Northampton Nat. Bank. 
Notes Payable, 

30 



49,670.82 


7,635.84 


60.00 


85.50 


1.400.00 


22.00 


2,467.43 


1,431.66 


, 7,65.00 


3,657.53 


612.40 


1.339.41 


435.12 


84.50 


204.15 


50.000.00 



Arthur J. Godin, Sealer's receipts for 1924, 45.55 

Webster Box Co., Highway Dept., 250.00 

H. W. Briggs, Cemetery lot at North Hatfield, .50 

Women's Endeavor & Book Club, Library acct. 10.00 
Treas. of Commonwealth, Allowance Bradstreet 

Stone Road, 6,000.00 
Treas. Hampshire County, Allowance Bradstreet 

Stone Road, 4,000.00 

Police Dept., Court Fines, . 918.00 
Overseers of Poor, Refunds from Hospital 

patients, 285.75 
Highway Dept., Rent of truck on Stone road 

construction, 706.00 

Highway Dept., Town of Whately, 6.00 
Highway Dept., N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. Co., 

Repairing Fence, N. Hatfield, 77.28 

Highway Dept., Bridge damage (Tizinni), 40.00 

Highway Dept., Digging ditch, 23.00 

$143,649.20 
Cr. 

By Cash Paid Selectmen's orders. $120,875.05 
State Tax, 5,100.00 

State Treas., Penalty, 8.00 

State Treas., Int. on Water Bonds, 860.00 

State Treas., Soldiers' Exemption Tax, 9.57 

State Treas., State Highway,' 708.00 

E. L. Graves, Tax sale exp.. 16.55 

Cash on hand, 15,072.03 

Peter Aloisi Bond, 1,000.00 

$143,649.20 

All accounts except those charged up by the State 
Treasurer are paid on Selectmen's orders, all orders are 
paid by check only. 

V. H. KELLER, 

Temporary Treasurer. 



31 



I have examined the books. and accounts of the Treas- 
urer of the Town of Hatfield for the year ending Dec. 31st. 
1924, and find them correct. I find Selectmen's orders on 
file to the amount of One hundred thirty eight thousand 
and two hundred thirty three and nine cents ($138,233.09) 
with evidence of their payment by him, also canceled notes 
and receipts for County and State Taxes, and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the treasury of Sixteen thousand 
seventy two dollars and three cents ($16,072.03). 

CHARLES W. WADE, 

Auditor. 



E. L. GRAVES in account with TOWN OF HATFIELD 
1923 POLL TAXES 

Dr. 

$565.00 



To Uncollected Taxes, 

Cr. 
By Cash Paid Town Treasurer, 
By receipts found. 
By Uncollected Taxes, 


$295.00 

90.00 

180.00 



$565.00 



1922 REAL AND PERSONAL TAX 

Dr. 

To Uncollected Taxes, $7,663.96 

Interest collected, 506.98 



Cr. 
By Cash Paid Town Treasurer, $6,463.83 

By Uncollected .Taxes, 1,707.11 



32 



,170.94 



$8,170.94 



1923 REAL AND PERSONAL TAX 
Dr. 



To Assessors' Warrant, 


$20,285.87 




To Interest Collected, 


388.32 


$20,674.19 


Cr. 




By Cash Paid Town Treasurer, 


$7,635.84 




By Receipts Found, 


231.45 




By Uncollected, 


12,806.90 


$20,674.1! 






Dr. 






1924 POLL 


TAX 




To Assessors, 




$1,340.00 


Cr. 






By Cash Paid Town Treasurer, 


$1,302.00 




By Uncollected, 


38.00 


$1,340.00 



1924 REAL AND PERSONAL TAX 

Dr. 

To Assessors' Warrant, $88,652.34 

To Interest Collected, 35.03 



Cr. 
By Cash Paid Town Treasurer, $49,670.82 

By Uncollected, 39,016.55 



$88,687.37 



$88,687.37 



!»■ -- 



I have this day examined the accounts of Tax Collector 
M. H. Dwight and find them correct. 

CHARLES W. WADE, Auditor. 
Jan. 19, 1925. 



SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 
Dr. 

To outstanding notes : 

Renewal of note No. 13 dated May 14, 1923, 

renewed by Note No. 16, Dated May 14th, 

1924, due May 14th 1925, rate 4%% $40,000.00 

Temporary note No. 19, dated Aug. 11th, 

1924 due Feb. 11th 1925, rate 4%% 10,000.00 

Temporary note No. 20, dated Sept, 27th 

1924, due Mar. 27th, 1925, rate 3*4% . 20,000.00 



$70,000.00 



Cr. 

By Uncollected Poll taxes, 1923, $180.00 

By Uncollected Poll Taxes, 1924 38.00 

By Uncollected Real & Prop., 1922, 1,707.11 

By Uncollected Real & Prop., 1923, 12,806.90 

By Uncollected Real & Prop., 1924, 39,016.55 

By Cash on hand, 15,072.03 



$68,820.59 



Balance against the town. 



$1,179.41 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 





Income 


Expense 


Balance 


Fund, 


1924 


1924 


1924 


Hannah W. Smith, 


$12.00 


$10.00 


$38.38 


Augusta Wells, 


15.64 


10.00 


349.76 


Oliver Warner, 


2.30 


2.00 


51.20 


John H. Sanderson, 


4.73 


4.00 


105.01 


Luman M. Moore, 


10.01 


8.00 


222.24 


P. M. Wells, 


2.34 




127.34 


Benjamin Waite, 


1.67 




76.65 


Abbv Dickinson, 


4.32 


3.50 


96.21 



34 



Lucy L. Morton, 


11.97 


4.00 


271.37 


Charles Smith, 


4.89 


4.00 


108.59 


Lemuel B. Field, 


4.86 


4.00 


108.06 


Charlotte G. Wilkie, 


49.34 




1,130.32 


Rufus H. Cowles, 


4.93 


4.00 


109.52 


Charles E. Hubbard, 


5.11 


4.00 


113.93 


Alpheus Cowles, 


4.77 


4.00 


105.99 


James Porter, 


4.66 


4.00 


103.44 


Daniel W. Allis, 


7.33 


5.00 


163.90 


J. H. Howard, 


4.64 


4.00 


103.07 


Fannie M. Burke, 


4.71 


4.00 


104.41 


Charles S. Shattuck, 


4.68 


4.00 


104.26 


Seth W. Kingsley, 


4.66 


4.00 


103.42 


E. S. Warner, 


9.27 


7.00 


206.53 


Reuben Belden, 


4.55 




105.13 


Theodore Porter, 


4.55 


4.00 


101.13 


Charles L. Graves, 


4.55 


4.00 


101.17 


Roswell Hubbard, 


4.55 


4.00 


100.55 


Cooley D. Dickinson, 


5.67 




130.67 


Elizah Bardwell, 


17.18 


4.00 


313.18 


Joseph D. Billings, 


4.15 


4.00 


100.15 


Memorial Town Hall, 


257.67Deposit 10.00 


3,378.87 


Edward C. Billings, 


25.00 


10.00 


555.00 


Augusta Beals, 


1.88 




101.88 



REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

We have the following amounts deposited to the credit of 
the Sinking Fund. 

Amherst Savings Bank $1,393.47 

Easthampton Savings Bank 2,080.37 

Haydenville Savings Bank 1,083.09 

Nonotuck Savings Bank 2,545.50 

Florence Savings Bank 2,572.82 

Northampton Institution for Savings 1,836.29 

Springfield Institution for Savings 2,573.68 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank 2,616.62 

35 



Union Trust Co., Springfield 3,389.49 

Mechanic Savings Bank, Holyoke 2,007.97 

Northampton National Bank, Savings Dept. 1,134.29 

First National Bank, Savings Dept. 1,097.31 

Hampshire County Trust Co., Savings Dept. 1,198.00 

N. Y, N. H. & H. R. R. Co., Bonds 2,000.00 

B. & M. R. R. Co., Bonds 3,000.00 

B. & M. R. R. Co., coupons 1 020.00 

U. S. Liberty Bonds 2,000.00 

Hatfield Water Bonds 7,000.00 



$40,548.90 
M. J. RYAN 
ERCENT E. GODIN 
JOHN J. BETSOLD 

Sinking Fund Committee 



Ihave this day examined the vouchers and securities of the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct 

CHARLES E. WARNER 
Auditor 
January 10, 1925. 



36 



Police Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : — 

The report of Police Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1924 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Total number of arrests during the year 1924, 143 



Males, 


136 






Females, 


7 






Offences for which arrests were made 








Drunkenness, 






21 


Speeding, 






39 


Disturbing the peace, 






9 


Violation of Liquor law, 






9 


Assault and Battery, 






8 


Breaking and Entering, 






5 


Gaming, 






22 


Vagrancy, 






3 


Unlicensed dogs, 






5 


Non-Support, 






1 


Driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquor, 


6 


Labor Violation, 






1 


Larceny, 






6 


Bastardy, 






1 


Driving so as to endanger lives and safety 


of public, 


4 


Stubbornness, 






1 


Junk Dealers not having license, 






2 
143 


Total fines District Court, 




$4,417.95 



Of this amount $1,212.00 was for violation of automobile 

37 



iaws ? and $1,450.00 wasr appealed to Superior Court. $40.00 
to the County, leaving a balance of $1,715.95 returned to 
the town. 

Term March 1st until Jan. 1st. total mileage on car was 
15.000 miles. 

Permit me to take this occasion to express my appre- 
ciation of your own very real support. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ARTHUR R. Breor. 
Police Officer. 



38 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1924 are as follows : — 





BIRTHS BY MONTHS 








No. 


Male 


Female 


January 

February 

March 


6 

8 

12 


4 
4 
5 


2 
4 

7 


April 

May 

June 


4 
5 
9 


2 

2 
3 


2 
3 
6 


July 

August 

September 

October 


8 
3 

10 
10 


6 
1 
6 
5 


2 
2 
4 
5 


November 


7 


6 


1 


December 


6 





3 



44 



44 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 

Born in United States 
Born in Poland 
Born in Austria 
Born in Czeeho-Slovakia 
Born in Canada 
Born in Jrlaiid 
Born in Germany 
Born in Lithuania 



34 


32 


46 


43 


2 


2 


5 


5 


1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


2 


2 



88 



88 



39 



BIRTHS FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1919 1920 1921 1922 1924 

98 S4 95 83 88 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

January 1 

February 2 

March 3 

April 1 

May 5 

June 3 

July 

August 1 

September 4 

October 2 

November 2 

December 



22 

First marriage of both parties, 21 

Second of bride, first of groom 1 

Second groom, second of bride 2 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 48 and 18 years of age 

respectively. 
The oldest and youngest brides were 46 and 17 years of age 

respectively. 

BIRTHPLACES OF PERSONS MARRIED 



Born in United States 
Born in Poland 
Born in Germany 
Born in Austria 
Born in Canada 



Groom 


Bride 


15 


16 


7 


4 


1 


2 . 


1 


1 





1 



24 24 



40 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



1919 


1920 1921 1922 


1924 




26 


17 22 


22 


24 






DEATHS BY MONTHS 








No. 




Male 


Female 

















1 




1 







1 







1 




4 




2 


2 




2 




2 







1 







1 




4 




2 


2 




4 




3 


1 




5 




1 


4 




2 




2 







6 




6 







5 




4 


1 



36 



23 



12 



No. 



Male 



Female 



Under 1 year of age 


7 


5 


2 


Between 1 and 10 years 


3 


2 


1 


Between 10 and 20 years 











Between 20 and 30 years 


2 


1 


1 


Between 30 and 40 


4 


2 


2 


Between 40 and 50 years 


3 


2 


1 


Between 50 and 60 years 


4 


3 


1 


Between 60 and 70 years 


4 


4 





Between 70 and 80 years 


5 


3 


2 


Between 80 and 90 years 


2 


1 


1 


Between 90 and 100 years 


1 





1 



35 



22 



19 



41 



Age of oldest person deceased, (female) 92 years. 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



Eugene S. Wheeler 
Etta M. Howard 
Henry Korza 
Elizabeth H. Billings 
Margaret J. Coffee 
Wleyra Koriskowska 
Lewis H. Kingsley 
Louis A. Parent 
Stella T. Kochan 
Nellie Kostek 
Thomas Kostek 

Vollinger 
Emily S. Godin 
Harry L. Howard 
Mary D. Barnes 
Catherine D. Breor 
George Lempert 
Edward Slicz 



Marietta M. Graves 
Mary A. Godin 
Rita Godin 
Richard Fitzgerald 
Dennis Reagan 
John Kikoski 
George H. Danforth 
Daniel Zimba 
George Zimba 
Thomas J. Ryan 
Egbert S. Warner 
Robert Proulx 
Joseph Fascza 
Patrick J. Whalen 
Thomas W. Casson 
Eva G. Brehm 
Willard Belden 



DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending Nov- 
ember 30, 1924, with settlements anr receipts for the accounts 
from the County Treasurer as follows: — 
j 30 Male dogs at $2.00 each $260.00 

11 Female dogs at $5.00 each 55.00, 



20 cents each 


$315.00 

28.20 


$286.80 
espectfully submitted, 

V. H. Keller, Town Clerk 

42 



Assessors" Report 



Value of assessed Personal Estate 


$719,447.00 


Value of assessed Real Estate 


2,140,283.00 


Total Value of assessed Estate 


$2,859,730.00 


Value of assessed buildings 


$1,171,264.00 


Value of assessed land 


969,019.00 




$2,140,283.00 


Number of polls assessed 


670 


Residents assessed on property 


534 


Non-Residents assessed on property 


68 


Number of persons assessed on property 


602 


For poll tax only 


257 


Rate of tax per $1,000. 


$31.00 


Number of horses assessed 


367 


Number of Cows assessed 


273 


Number of Neat Cattle assessed 


22 


Number of Fowls assessed 


270 


Number of dwelling houses 


454 


Acres of land 


9,195 


State tax 


$5,100.00 


State highway tax 


708.00 


County tax 


7,208.84 


Town tax 


74,868.47 


Overlayings 


2,107.03 




$89,992.34 



43 



Addition to warrant 


46.81 


Estimated receipts 


$10,945.53 


Value of Property exempt from taxation under 




Chap. 59 General Laws 




Church Property 


$53,700.00 


Town property 


261,200.00 


Respectfully submitted, 





JOHN R. McGRATH 
MYRON H. D WIGHT 

Assessors of Hatfield 



44 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the Thirtieth 
Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows: 

Balance on Deposit e from last year's account $5,584.78 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

Deposit Amherst Savings Bank 1,680.56 

Deposit Northampton National Bank 2,222.69 

Deposit Northampton Institution for Savings 1,105.37 

Deposit First National Bank, Savings Dept. 1,037.43 

Cash from Collection of Water Rates 5,825.54 

Interest on deposit, First National Bank 167.64 

Interest on deposit, Liberty Bond 42.50 

Interest on deposit, Amherst Savings Bank 76.45 
Interest on deposit, Northampton Inst, for Savings 50.29 
Interest on deposit, First National Bank, Savings Dept. 42.10 

Interest on deposit, Northampton National Bank 87.76 



$18,923.11 



We have paid out thepast year as follows : 

Town of Hatfield $2,922.00 

Salaries of Water Commissioners 104.00 
United States Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry for 

water pipe 913.48 

Northampton Water Dept., Labor and Supplies 261.63 

W. H. Riley & Co., Supplies 252.92 

Boston. & Maine R. R, Co., Freight on water pipe 94.55 

Webster Box Co., hauling water pipe 17.50 
Northampton Machine & Welding Co., Welding 

Stand Pipe 8.50 

46 



Wm. W. Wolfram, Laying water pipe 

(No. Hatfield) 606.74 
Norwood Engineering Co., Services, Boxes and 

Hydrants 186.50 

W. L. Graves, Labor and supplies 160.00 

W. P. Boyle, Painting 114 Hydrants 74.45 

H. S. Gere & Sons, Ads, Bids for laying water pipe 4.26 
E. W. Strong, Collecting Water Rates, Labor 

and Cask Paid 390.90 



Total 



$5,997.43 
$12,925.68 



Balance in the treasury. 

Cash on Deposit First National Bank $5,623.03 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

Deposit Northampton National Bank 2,310.45 

Deposit First National Bank, Savings Dept 1,079.53 

Deposit Northampton Inst, for Savings 1,155.66 

Deposit Amherst Savings Bank 1,757.01 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. KILEY, Clerk 

ROSWELL G. BILLINGS 
L. A. DEINLEIN 

Water Commissioners. ' 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Water Commissioners of the town of Hatfield and I find them 
correct with orders on file for all payments made and a bal- 
ance in the treasury of $12,925.68. 



CHARLES W. WADE 
Auditor 



January 19, 1925. 



46 



Report of Library Trustees 



We wish to express our appreciation of the faithful and 
efficient work of the librarian. Miss Waite and of Miss Carrie 
C. Cutter, at West Hatfield, Mrs. Danforth of No. Hatfield, 
and Mrs. Laura L. Belden of Bradstreet, who is succeeded 
by Mrs. Alice Kacinski. 

The report of the librarian covering the work of the li- 
brary for the past year is herewith submitted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARIAN C. BILLINGS 
MARGARET A. MULLANY 
VERNET H. KELLER 

Library Trustees 



47 



Report of Librarian 

To the Trustees of the Public Library: 

During the year,, 1924, 428 books have been added to the 
library. 392 bp purchase and 36 were gifts. Of these books 
200 were for the juvenile department, 137 of them for young 
children. 

Mrs. Anna M. B. Usher sent us thirty books from the li- 
brary of her grandfather, Samuel D. Partridge, who was 
born in Hatfield, October 15, 1806. 

The circulation of books and magazines has been 5,749 in 
the juvenile department, 7,109 in the adult, making a total 
circulation of 12,858. 

The Woman's Endeavor and Book Club offered a prize to 
the boys and girls of the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grades for the 
best review of some book selected from the A. L. A. list. 
These prizes consisting of books were won by : 

Stacia Michajluk 8th Grade 

William Celtaka 8th Grade 

Julia Gutfinski 7th Grade 

Peter Kogalewski 7th Grade 

Josephine Filipek 6th- Grade 

Harold Watson 6th Grade 

Gertrude Boyle 5th Grade 

Frank Jablonski 5th Grade 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Balance from Fines of 1923 $ .18 

Fines, 1924 12.60 

From sale of old paper 1.10 



$ 13.88 



48 



Supplies 


$7.54 


Postage and Express 


5.63 


Balance on hand 


.71 




$ 13.88 




ELLEN A. WAITE 




Librarian 


BOOKS ENTERED DURING 1924 




Fiction 


Ayres, Ruby 


Richard Chatterton 


Ayres, Ruby 


Winds of the World 


Bailey, H. C. 


The Highwayman 


Bailey, Temple 


Peacock Feathers 


Barnett, Ada 


The Joyous Adventure 


Bindloss, Harold 


Green Timber 


Bindloss, Harold 


Carson of Red River 


Bower, B. M. 


The Lonesome Trail 


Bower, B. M. 


Starr of the Desert 


Buck, Charles N. 


The Roof Tree 


Buchan, John 


The Three Hostages 


Burt, St rather s 


The Interpreter's House 


Camp, Wadsworth 


The Hidden Road 


Canfield, Dorothy 


The Home-maker 


Carey, Rosa 


Not Like Other Girls 


Comstock, Harriet 


At the Cross-roads 


Comstock, Sarah 


Daughter of Helen Kent 


Cooper, James A. 


Capt. Abe, Store. Keeper 


Crawford, Marion 


The White Sister 


Cullum, Ridgwell 


The Man in the Twilight 


Curwood, J. 0. 


A Gentleman of Courage 


Curwood, J. 0. 


Courage of Madge O'Doone 


Curwood, J. 0. 


The River's End 


Curwood, J. 0. 


Steele of the Royal Mounted 


Conrad, Joseph 


Lord Jim 


De Jeans, Elizabeth 


The Double House 



49 



Deland, Margaret 
Dell, Ethel M. 
Dell, Ethel M. 
DeU, Ethel M. 
Dell, Ethel M. 
Dodge, Lewis 
Douglas, 0. 
Dumas. Alexander 
Durkin, Douglas 
Ertz, Susan 
Evans, Larry 
Ferber, Edna 
Pitch, Albert P. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Galsworthy, John 
Gibbs, Philip 
Garston, Crosbie 
Gregory, Jackson 
Gregory, Jagckson 
Gregory, Jackson 
Gregory, Jackson 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane- 
Grimshaw, Beatrice 
Hall, Herschel 
Hankins, A. P. 
Hart, William S. 
Henry, 0. 

Hergesheimer, Joseph 
Hough, Emerson 
Hough, Emerson 
Husband, Joseph 



New Friends in Old Chester 

The Unknown Quantity 

The Rock of Valpre 

The Obstacle Race 

Rosa Mundi 

Tawi-Tawi 

Pink Sugar 

Ten Years Later 

The Lobstick Trail 

Nina 

Then 111 Come Back to You 

So Big 

None So Blind 

The Safty Pin 

The White Monkey 

Heirs Apparent 

The Owl's House 

Desert Valley 

The Outlaw 

Six Feet Four 

Under Handicap 

The Call of the Canyon 

Riders of the Purple Sage 

The Spirit of the Border 

Tappan's Burro 

The Thundering Herd 

Wild Fire 

The U. P. Trail 

The Sands of Oro 

Steel Preferred 

The She Boss 

A Lighter of Flames 

Prize Stories of 1923 

Balisand 

Heart's Desire 

The Covered Wagon 

High Hurdles 



50 



Jordan, Kate 
Kelland, Clarence B. 
Kelland, Clarence B. 
Kelland, Clarence B. 
Knibbs, H. H. 
Kyne, Peter B. 
Kyne, Peter B. 
Kyne, Peter B. 
Lincoln, Joseph 
Locke, Wm. J. 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Mc Carter, Margaret 
McCauley, Rose 
Me dure, Marjorie 
McCutcheon, George B. 
McFee, William 
McGrath, Harold 
McGrath, Harold 
Harshall, Edison 
Miller, Alice Duer 
Miller, Elizabeth 
Miller, Olive Thorne 
Mitchell, Ruth C. 
Morley, Christopher and 
Norris. Charles G. 
Norris, Kathleen 
Norris, Kathleen 
Oppenheim, E. Phillips 
Oppenheim, E. Phillips 
Oppenheim, E. Phillips 
Oppenheim, E. Phillips 
Oyen, Henry 
Packard, Frank L. 



Against the Wind 

The Highflyers 

Scattergood Baines 

The Steadfast Heart 

Wild Horses 

The Enchanted Hill 

Kindred of the Dust 

The Valley of the Giants 

Rugged Waters 

The Coming of Amos 

Re-creations 

The City of Fire 

Dawn of the Morning 

The Finding of Jasper Holt 

The Search 

Homeland 

Told by an Idiot 

High Fires 

Sherry 

Race 

The Green Stone 

The World Outside 

The Voice of the Pack 

The Priceless Pearl 

The Yoke 

Poppea of the Post Office 

A White Stone 

Don Marquis Pandora lifts the Lid 

Bread 

Rose of the World 

The Callahans and the Murphys 

Nobody's Man 

The Wrath to Come 

The Passionate Quest 

Jeanne of the Marshes 

Twisted Trails 

The Locked Box 



Packard, Frank L. 
Packard, Frank E. 
Paine, Ralph 
Patrick, Diana 
Parrish, Randall 
Parrish, Randall 
Payne, Elizabeth 
Pedler, Margaret 
Pedler, Margaret 
Pedler, Margaret 
Pedlar, Margaret 
Pendexter, Hugh 
Piper, Margaret 
Porter, Eleanor 
Porter, Gene Stratton 
Porter, Gene Stratton 
Porter, Gene Stratton 
Pryde, Anthony 
Putnam, Nina Wilcox 
Raine, Wm. McLeod 
Raine, Wm. McLeod 
Raine, Wm. McLeod 
Rathbone, Cornelia 
Reeve, Arthur 
Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie 
Ritchie, R. W. 
Robertson, Morgan 
Ruck, Bertha 
Ruck, Bertha 
Ruck, Bertha 
Ruck, Bertha 
Ruck, Bertha 
Sawyer, Ruth 
Sabin, 

Sedgwick, A. D. 
Smith, Gordon A. 
Smith, Harriet L. 



Greater Love Hath no Man 

Doves of the Night 

Four Bells 

The Island of Desire 

Molly McDonald 

The Devil's Own 

Fathoms Deep 

The Lamp of Fate 

The Barbarian Love] 1 

The Hermit of Far End 

The House of Dreams 

Pay Gravel 

Peter's Best Seller 

Mary Marie 

Girl of the Limberlost 

The Harvester 

Daughter of the Land 

An Ordeal of Honor 

Laughter Limited 

Oh, you Tex 

Bucky O'Connor 

Steve Yeager 

Darkened Windows 

Craig Kennedy Listens in 

His Second Venture 

The Dust of the Desert 

Masters of Men 

His Official Fiance 

Sir or Madam 

Miss Million's Maid 

The Leap Year Girl 

The Subconscious Courtship 

Gladiola Murphy 

City of the Sun 

The Little French Girl 

There goes the Groom 

Pollyanna of the Orange Blossoms 



52 



Speare, Dorothy 
Sterrett, Frances 
Stringer, Arthur 
Stevenson, Burton 
Swinnerton, Frank 
Tarkington, Booth 
Terhune, Albert P. 
Thayer, Lee 
Thayer, Lee 
Thompson, 
Train, Arthur 
Walpole, Hugh 
Webster, Henry K. 
Webster, Henry K. 
Wells, Carolyn 
Wells, Carolyn 
Watson, E. L. G. 
Wells, H. G. 
Wentworth, Patricia 
Wiggin, Kate Douglas 
Widdemer, Margaret 
Widdemer, Margaret 
White, Grace M. 
White, Grace M. 
Williams, Ben Ames 
Williams, Ben Ames 
Williams, Valentine 
Willsie, Honore 
Wilson, Harry Leon 
Wilson, Harry Leon 
Wilt, A. M. S. 
Woden, George 
Woden, George 
Wodehouse, P. G. 



Dancers in the Dark 

The Jam Girl 

Empty Hands 

The Storm Center 

Young Felix 

The Midlander 

Buff, a Collie 

The Unlatched Door 

That Affair at the Cedars 

The Last Time 

The Needle's Eye 

The Old Ladies 

The Thoroughbred 

Joseph Greer and his Daughter 

Anybody but Anne 

The Vanishing of Betty Varian 

Desert Horizon 

The Dreamer 

Adventures of Jane Smith 

Rose of the River 

Rose Garden Husband 

Charis sees it Through 

Tess of the Storm Country 

The Secret of th a Storm Country 

Audacity 

All the Brothers; were Valliant 

Island Gold 

The Devonshers 

Bunker Bean 

Professor how could you 

Head Winds 

Little Houses 

Our Peter 



Leave it to Psmith 
Miscellaneous 
My Garden of Memory Kate Douglas Wiggin 

Abroad with Mark Twain and Eugene Field 



53 



Forty Odd Years in a Literary 


Shop James L. Ford 


The Letters of Archie Butt 


Abbott 


Myself and a Few Mores 


S. A. Cloman 


Black Laughter 


Llewyn Powys 


Romantic Rise of a Great American (John Wanamaker) 




Russell Conwell 


The Story of Mankind 


Hendrik Van Loon 


Northern Neighbors 


W. T. Grenfell 


American Pictures and Painters 


i Bryant 


In Berkshire Fields 


Walter P. Eaton 


Glimpses of Japan and Formosa 


Franck 


My Impression of America 


Margot Asquith 


The Real South America Domville Fife 


Single Blessedness 


George Ade 


Overset 


Franklin P. Adams 


The First Million the Hardest 


Farquhar 


The Country of the Dwarfs 


DuChaillu 


Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 2 vols. 


Presented 


Taxation the Peoples' Business, 


Mellon Presented 


Personal Relation in Industry 


Rockefeller Presented 


The Tragedy of Hungary 


Birinyi Presented 


Juvenile Department 


Alcott, L. M. 


Little Women 


Altsheler, Joseph 


Eyes of the Woode 


Altsheler, Joseph 


The Free Rangers 


Altsheler, Joseph 


The Great Sioux Trail 


Altsheler, Joseph 


Hunters of the Hills 


Altsheler, Joseph 


The Lost Hunters 


Altsheler, Joseph 


Riflemen of the Ohio 


Altsheler, Joseph 


The Texan Scouts 


Barbour, Ralph 


Left Guard Gilbert 


Brooks, Amy 


Rosalie Dare 


Brown, Edna 


Robin Hollow 


Cable, Boyd 


Air Men O'War 


Campbell, Ruth 


All Alone House 


Canfield, Dorothy 


Understood Betsey 


Carroll, Lewis 


Alice in Wonderland 



Chaffer, Allen 
Chandler, Anna 
Cobb, B. and E. 
Cobb, B. and E. 
Deland, Ellen 
Deland, Ellen 
Dowd, Emma 
Downes, Alfred 
Du Chaillu, Paul 
Fitzhugh, Percy 
Forrester, I. L. 
Gates, Eleanor 
Ginther, P. 
Green, Fitzhugh 
Gre., Zane 
Hawkes, Clarence 
Hawkes, Clarence 
Heyliger, William Bartley 
Heyliger, Wililam Bartley 
Holland, Rupert 
Hume, Ethel 
Jacobs, Caroline 
Jacobs, Caroline 
Kelland, Clarence B. 
Kelland, Clarence B. 
Mathewson, Christy 
Mathewson, Christie 
Miller, Warren 
Otis, James 
Porter, Eleanor 
Pyle, Katharine 
Quirk, Leslie 
Rankin, Carroll 
Rankin, Carroll 
Ruskin, John 
Schultz, J. W. 
Scoville, Samuel 



Sitka, the Snow Baby 

Pan the Piper 

Anita 

k Clematis 

Josephine 

Alan Ransford 

When Polly was Eighteen 

Fire Fighters and their Pets 

Lost in the Jungle 

Tom Slade, Boy Scout 

The Polly Page Motor Club 

The Rich Little Poor Boy 

Hilda of Grey Cot 

Mystery of the Erik 

The Young Pitcher 

Silversheene 

A Gentleman from France 

Freshman Pitcher 

Don Strong of the Wolf Patrol 

Blackbeard's Island 

Judy of York Hill 

A Texas Bluebonnet 

Joan's California Summer 

Catty Atkins 

Mark Tidd in the Back Woods 

Catcher Craig 

Pitching in a Pinch 

Red Mesa 

Silent Pete 

Polly aim a 

In the Green Forest 

Baby Eaton, Quarter-back 

Dandelion Cottage 

The Adoption of Rosa Marie 

King of the Golden River 

Quest of the Fish Dog Skin 

The Blue Pearl 



Sharp, Evelyn 
Sidney, Margaret 
Smith, Mary P. W. 
Taggart, Marion * 

Tappan, Eva M. 
Thackeray, Wm. 
Twain, Mark 
Twain, Mark 
White, Steware Edward 
Wiggin Kate D. 
Bailey, Carolyn 
Bailey, Carolyn 
Banta, N. M. 
Banta, N. M. 
Blaisdell, 
Blaisdell, 
Blaisdell, 
Blaisdell, 

Blaisdell and Ball, 
Blaisdell and Ball, 
Brooks, Dorothy 
Brooks, Elbridge 
Brooks, Elbridge 
Burgess, Thornton 
Byington, E. 
Campbell, H. L. 
Chaffee, Allen 
Chappell, L. (ed. by) 
Chase, Annie 
Children's Cherry Series 
Cowles, Julia 
Cowles, Julia 
Craik, Georgian a 
Deihl Edna 
Denton, Clara 
Denton, Clara 
Fox, Prances 



Who was Jane 

Five Little Peppers 

Young Puritans of Old Hadley 

Daddy's Daughters 

Ella 

The Rose and the Ring 

Adventures of Tom Sawyer 

Huckleberry Finn 

The Magic Forest 

The Bird's Christmas Carol 

Little Man and Women Stories 

Reading Time Stories 

The J?airy Primer 

Four and Fourty Fairies 

Twilight Town 

Bunny Rabbit's Diary 

Cherry Tree Children 

Boy Blue and His Friends 

Hero Stories from Amer. History 

Short Stories from Amer. History 

Stories of the Red Children 

True Story of George Washington 

True Story of Abraham Lincoln 

Adventures of Bob White 

Doll-land Stories 

Little Jan the Dutch Boy 

Twinkley Eyes 

Robinson Crusoe 

Children of the W T igwam 

5 vols. 

Children of Mother Goose 

Child's own Fairy Book 

Bow-wow and Mew-mew 

Flower and Berry Babies 

Open Air Stories 

Busy Little Birds 

Little Bear's Adventure 



56 



Gray, Emily 

Hawkes, Ernest 

June, Caroline 

Klingensmith, A. 

Laboulaye 's 

Lansing, Marion 

Lang, Andrew 

Lang, Andrew 

Lang, Andrew 

Lang, Andrew 

Lang, Andrew 

Lucia, Rose 

Maguire, Emma 

Merriam, Ida 

Merriam, Ida 

Mordaunt, Elinor 

Mulock, Miss 

Muller, Mary 

Nida, W. L. 

Norton, Charles Eliot 

Oi-ton, Helen 

O'Shea, M. V. 

Porter. Bertha 

Pratt, Mira Amer 

Sawyer, Ruth 

Simmerman, H. T. 

Smith, Gertrude 

Smith, Gertrude 

Smith, Laura 

Smith, Laura 

Smith, Laura 

Smith, Laura 

Smith, Laura 

Smith. Laura 

Smith, Laura 

Smith, Laura 

Smith, Laura 



Pinocchio, a dramatic Reader 

Eskimo Land 

Rosy Face Twins 

Just Stories 

Fairy Book 

Quaint Old Stories 

Dick Whittington 

Princess on the Glass Hill 

Red True Story Book 

Blue Fairy Book 

Prince Darling 

Peter and Polly Books, 4 vols. 

Two Little Indians 

Washington's Boyhood 

Knowledge Primer Games 

Shoe and Stocking Stories 

Adventures of a Brownie 

Little People of the Snow 

Ab the Cave Man 

Heart of Oak Books, I, II 

Summer at Cloverfield Farm 

Six Nursery Classics 

Trudy and Timothy 

ica's Story for America's Children 

Tale of the Enchanted Bunnies 

Story of Two Kittens 

The Roggie and Reggie Stories 

Tale of Janey, Josey and Joe 

Bunny and Bear Book 

Brownie Mew 

Candy Shop Cottontails 

Cotton Tails in Toyland 

Fairy Babies 

Fifty Funny Animal Tales 

Little Bear 

Little Eskimo 

Merry Little Cottontails 



57 



Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Smith, Laura 
Spyri, Johanna 
Snell, R. J. 
Tappan, Eva 
Welsh, Charles 
Wright, Julia 

Bant a, 

Blaisdell 

Blodgett 

Browne, 

Cyr's 

Davis, 

Edson, Laing 

Field 

Free and Treadwell 

Gordon, 

Grover, 

Haliburton, 

Heath, 

Holbrook 

Jones 

Kendall 

Magee. 

Riverside, 

Wade and Sylvester 



Mother Goose Stories 

Roly Poly Book 

Runaway Bunnies 

Seventeen Little Bears 

Singing Twins 

Six Tiddly Winks 

Snubby Nose and Tippy Toes 

Tale of Bunny Cotton Tail 

Tale of Curly Tale 

Tiddly Winks 

Treasure Twins 

1 Heidi 

The Dinner that was always There 

Letters to Colonial Children 

A Book of Nursery Rhymes 

Seaside and Wayside 

Readers 

Brownie Primer 

Child Life Primer, Rhyme and Story, I 

Primer, First, Second 

First, Second 

First, Second 

Seabrownie, First, Second 

Introductory, First, Second 

Primer, First 

Primer, First, Second 

Primer. First, Second, Third 

Outdoor Primmer, Child Life Primer 

Primer, First, Second 

First, Second, Book I 

Hiawatha Primer 

First, Second 

Primer, First, Second 

• First, Second 

Primer, First, Second 

Primer, First. Second 



58 



Magazines 



American Magazine 
Good Housekeeping 
Harper's Magazine 
Scribner's Magazine 
National Geographic 
Popular Mechanics 
Review of Reviews 
World's Work 
Science and Invention 
Ladies' Home Journal 
Child Life 
St. Nicholas 
Boys' Life 
The American Bov 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1924 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Adam J. Smith, Chairman Trem expires 1925 

Patrick W. Mullins, Secretary Term expires 1926 

Harry W. Marsh Term expires 1927 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Orion A. Morton 
177 Prospect St., Northampton Telephone 2103-M 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D. (Center and North Hatfield schools) 
C. A. Byrne, M. D. (Hill, Bradstreet, West Hatfield schools) 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

Chief Arthur R. Breor 



Between 5 and 7 
Between 7 and 14 
Between 14 and 16 



Total for 1923 

63 



SCHOOL CENSUS 






April 1, 1924 






Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


85 


82 


167 


278 


244 


522 


46 


52 


98 


409 


378 


787 


388 


351 


739 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy 



First Term — 7 weeks 



Second Term — 8 weeks 



Spring Term — 8 weeks 



Fall Term — 15 weeks 



First Winter Term- 



Opens December 29, 1924 
Closes February 13, 1925 

Opens February 23, 1925 
Closes April 17, 1925 

Opens April 27, 1925 
Closes June 19, 1925 

Opens September 8, 1925 
Closes December, 18. 1925 

Opens January 4, 1926 



No school on legal holidays and Good Friday. 

Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week and 
reopen the following Monday. 

When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following Mon- 
day is observed as a holiday. Yegal holidays in Massachusetts 
include January first, February twenty-second, April nine- 
teenth, May thirtieth, July Fourth, the first Monday in Sep- 
tember, October twelfth Thanksgiving and Christmas. 



Report of School Committee 

When the census was taken last spring and the rearrange- 
ment of the children in grades for the opening of schools in 
September, it was found that grades 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were over- 
crowded. It was necessary to open another room at the Cen- 
ter for second and third grade children and to provide a 
room for the fourth, fifth and sixth grades at the Center. An 
extra room was needed at Bradstreet for the third grade 
from the primary room and the fourth grade from the gram- 
mar room. 

The small brick building on School Street was carefully 
examined. We were convinced that this building could be 
converted into an up-to-date two-room building for the 
first, second and third grades, using the first grade room in 
the main building for the overflow in the fourth, fifth and 
sixth grades. 

The two upper rooms in the School Street building were 
thoroughly remodeled, new furniture and slate blackboards 
purchased, a new heating and ventilating plant installed and 
the roof repaired. 

At Bradstreet the hall on the second floor was divided in- 
to two rooms — one for school purposes and the other as a 
hall. A partition was built, both rooms remodeled, new fur- 
niture and slate blackboards purchased, new ventilating sys- 
tem installed, roof thoroughly repaired and the two lower 
rooms put in first-class condition. 

At North Hatfield some new furniture was purchased and 
such repairs made as seemed necessary for the present year. 

All the work, except at North Hatfield, was done according 
to plans and specifications and under the supervision of Karl 
Scott Putnam, architect, Northampton. 

A special appropriation of $8,000 was made to cover the 
cost of this work. When work was under way, certain things 

65 



came to light that could not be fully determined in advance 
as the very poor condition of the slate roofs and other smaller 
items. We felt that it would be economical and much more 
satisfactory to make a thorough and complete job while the 
workmen were on the spot even if the appropriation were 
slightly exceeded. As it was difficult to tell accurately in ad- 
vance just what the excess on each unit would be, we complet- 
ed the work in each case satisfactorily at the least cost pos- 
sible which explains the overdraft. 

As the School Street building is a part of the Center group, 
it seemed best to have one janitor responsible for the whole 
system. For this reason the salary was increased $180, mak- 
ing the total salary for the twelve months $1,950 for the jan- 
itor, his helper during the winter months including the extra 
work for the evening school and all the cleaning of the 
buildings during the year. There are 27 rooms, 7 large cor- 
ridos, 4 large hot air furnaces and 3 steam boilers. This 
figures about $57 per unit of area. The outlaying buildings 
cost about $117 per unit of area plus the cost of cleaning 
during the summer months. 

As the sentiment at the special town meeting seemed to be 
to erect a new three-room building instead of remodeling the 
present one at North Hatfield, a plan for such a building has 
been drawn and a general estimate of the cost has been se- 
cured. The plan will be ready for inspection at the town 
meeting. 

While over half the corps of teachers went to new positions 
during the year, the new teachers who took their positions 
have entered upon their work with enthusiasm and general 
satisfaction. We were sorry to lose our good teachers. As 
this seemed necessary, we feel that the town has been fortu- 
nate in the selection of those who have taken their places. 

In closing, we wish to thank all the teachers and the super- 
intendent of the schools for their loyalty and hearty coopera- 
tion in all the work of the year. 

ADAM J. SMITH 
PATRICK W. MULLINS 
HARRY W. MARSH 

66 



Financial Statement 

December 31, 1924 





RECEIPTS 




Town Appropriation, 




$36,000.00 


All Other Sources, 




13,300.88 




•p^C7,OUV.OO 


EXPENDITURES 




School Committee, 




$201.00 


Superintendent of Schools and Attend- 




ance Officers, 




1,700.00 


Supervisors, 




1,528.00 


Teachers — High School, 




10,885.43 


Teachers — Elementary, 




18,927.73 


Teachers' Retirement Board, 


1,292.60 


School Nurse, 




900.00 


Janitors and Cleaning, 




3,004.36 


Fuel. 




3,118.31 


Repairs. 




1,022.01 


Books and Supplies, 




3,543.27 


Miscellaneous, 




1,435.45 

<fc/|7 ^q if; 




«ptr t ,000. -LU 



Balance unexpended, 

SPECIAL REPAIRS 
RECEIPTS 

Special Appropriation, 

EXPENDITURES 

Bradstreet Building, $2,151.28 

School Street Building, 6,788.71 

Architect, 288.00 



$1,742.72 



$8,000.00 



Overdraft, 



$9,227.99 
$1,227.99 



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